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New ideas needed > I have multiple legacy IDE HDs and I need to get Windows 7 (Enterprise 64 bit) to "see" them

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  • Windows 7
  • Legacy
  • Storage
  • Enterprise
Last response: in Storage
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May 2, 2014 3:46:39 AM

Hey guys,

Ok, before I go further, there are 100 posts on this topic through the internet with the same answers so I'd like a little "Tier 2" tech support action... no cut and pastes about the "drive letter" dog and pony show in disk manager ;) 

I have about seven old IDE HDs... like, OLD. KORG OS, Stand alone Brother word processor, Windows 3.1 etc..

I want in. Or as Peter Griffin says, "I'm gonna get me that honey!"

So I have them in an enclosure (USB/IDE) and they're seen in device manager as a disk drive, but disk manager is not assigning them a number, so recovery software has no shot to tinker with it.

I imagine the files on the front of the drive are useless to Win7, so it hasn't the foggiest idea what to do with it.

I have reached the peak of my intelligence level.

Any ideas?

Nik

More about : ideas needed multiple legacy ide hds windows enterprise bit

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a b $ Windows 7
a c 130 G Storage
May 2, 2014 4:18:01 AM

I haven't done a huge amount with partitions in Windows, but from my experience Linux is a lot better at getting unusual and old formats to work.

You may want to pick up an Ubuntu or Kubuntu ISO and burn it to a USB or DVD.
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May 2, 2014 6:46:19 AM

Someone Somewhere said:
I haven't done a huge amount with partitions in Windows, but from my experience Linux is a lot better at getting unusual and old formats to work.

You may want to pick up an Ubuntu or Kubuntu ISO and burn it to a USB or DVD.



Hmmm.. interesting. Can Win7 run this OS virtually? I've never even heard of this being done, but it's fascinating.
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a b $ Windows 7
a c 130 G Storage
May 2, 2014 7:03:34 AM

You can run various flavours of linux inside a VM, though I'm not sure if they'd have access to your external drives.

I'd just reboot into a liveUSB (you don't need to install anything; it boots off the drive) and then move them to your main partition.
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May 2, 2014 3:49:56 PM

Thanks for the feedback... I'll try that out.
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a b $ Windows 7
a c 363 G Storage
May 2, 2014 9:45:54 PM

You say you have "them" in an external enclosure for IDE drives that connects to your computer via USB. First, I'm not clear whether that means the enclosure now contains many IDE units, none of them usable, or whether you mean the enclosure can handle one HDD at a time.

More importantly, though, those HDD units appear really old. So old, I wonder whether the interface board in the enclosure can deal with them. In the "old days" HDD controllers had the ability to "auto-detect" HDD parameters. That meant that they could figure out the proper settings for Cylinders, Heads and Sectors, and often a couple additional parameters. If the auto-detect system failed, you could always manually set these parameters (or a "Type Number") in BIOS Setup's screen for the controller and get it to work. For that purpose, the HDD unit itself had a label showing the proper CHS settings. Modern controllers, on the other hand, work with a different method of communicating with modern drives based on LBA, or Logical Block Addressing, that leaves the translation of LBA into CHS co-ordinates to the processor boards on the HDD unit. So I'm wondering whether the control board inside the external enclosure is capable of doing the old-style auto-detect operation if that's what the old HDD units need.

You might try this. Temporarily mount one of those old drives as an internal drive, and boot into BIOS Setup. Look at what it says about that drive. If that makes little sense or it appears to have mis-configured that unit, look in BIOS for the screen where you can force a more thorough auto-detect process. If that still does not work, see if there is a place where you can specify Cylinders, Heads, and Sectors, and maybe a Landing Zone etc. Your computer's mobo HDD controller chip and BIOS may be capable of more than what your enclosure's smarts can do.
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