Can "Coolaboratory Liquid Metal Pad" be used without scratching things up? Is it easier to remove than liquid metal pro?

I don't really wanna go through scratching up my stuff or having a huge issue removing it later. So liquid metal pro is kinda out of the question.

So I dunno, I'm between Gelid GC Extreme and Coolaboratory Liquid Metal Pad.

If the pad allows me to do it without roughing up my CPU/GPU and is a bit easier to clear off, then I'll use it. But otherwise I guess I'll go with the GC Extreme.

FYI I'm using this as a reference for my choice - http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/thermal-paste-performance-benchmark,3616-19.html

Thanks in advance!
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More about coolaboratory liquid metal pad scratching things easier remove liquid metal pro
  1. if you actually READ the toms article you should have the common sense to not use either. there is almost no benefit vs a normal good quality thermal paste. A 2 or 3 degrees is nothing. if you even have to ask the question you shouldn't be considering either
  2. Not even GC Extreme? It didn't sound nearly as tough as the Liquid Metal stuff.

    I just really wanna get more out of this system. AS5 isn't really doing great anymore for me, but I think that's because my tube of it is 2 years old now. I just want the best replacement for it I can get.

    And I am the type to take some small risks here and there. I can see the liquid metal stuff being a pain, but the GC Extreme sounds like it might not be much harder than AS5, right? I mean I'm not a total novice.

    PS: I did read the article. I'm just a little cray.
  3. to be honest I didn't even know anyone still considered artic silver 5... its been being beat by modern non conductive compounds for almost a decade. but the thermal compound will only ever get you a degree or two. unless you are using something awful. its never going to let you "push your system". a better cooler might. but that depends more on the chip.
  4. Be very careful with those liquid metal TIMs, your choice of cooler is also extremely important as well as the material your case is made out of. If you have an aluminum heatsink you CANNOT use it, if you have an aluminum case you should not use it. A small amount of those liquid metal TIMs will rapidly compromise anything aluminum
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaMWxLCGY0U

    Overall, i don't think the risks involved in using heavy metals as TIM is worth it.
  5. hunter315 said:
    Be very careful with those liquid metal TIMs, your choice of cooler is also extremely important as well as the material your case is made out of. If you have an aluminum heatsink you CANNOT use it, if you have an aluminum case you should not use it. A small amount of those liquid metal TIMs will rapidly compromise anything aluminum
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaMWxLCGY0U

    Overall, i don't think the risks involved in using heavy metals as TIM is worth it.


    Well the heatsink is that orangeish color, so I'm guessing it's copper. I've got an i7 2920XM and NVIDIA 580M - those aren't made of anything that would be corroded are they? My casing is mostly plastic.

    I don't really understand the "cooler" stuff. I just use the fans/heatsinks that came with this laptop. In China this laptop is quite strange (from Origin PC with a Clevo chassis, both companies that don't exist in China) so there's no local alternatives and they'd probably be sh*tty ones even if there were. Last time this laptop broke I had to take it back to the US to do anything about it, lol. Most Chinese shops see my computer and just think it's huge for a laptop and totally new to them. I mean, they're used to taking apart crappy plastic Dells and stuff - we're talking about a country that most websites from won't work in any browsers post IE 8 (I have to use IE to browse many sites here...)

    How about the GC Extreme, how's that hold-up and apply?
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