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What is Intel Hyperthreading and why does it make a quad core Intel better than an AMD octocore?

Okay, so let me start you off with what I know, and then what I Want to know. So i know that Intels are widely regarded as better than AMD (If you have the money), and that Intel uses Hyperthreading, and intel will also use separate Virtual Cores. Know what i don't know, is how these virtual cores will make Intel Better than AMD, especially when a Processor like the AMD fx-8350 is one of the best AMD Processor, and i don't understand why intel is better.
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More about intel hyperthreading make quad core intel amd octocore
  1. It's not that that makes the difference so much as the fact that for every clock on an Intel the cpu does more work than an AMD cpu.
  2. i7Baby said:
    It's not that that makes the difference so much as the fact that for every clock on an Intel the cpu does more work than an AMD cpu.


    Can you Elaborate onto this please?
  3. ^^ what he said, but on top of that, the virtual cores work like using two hands to feed your mouth. There is only one mouth (core), but if it's fast enough you can feed it twice as much as with just one hand.

    This is why intel is faster because it has a faster core (mouth), and because it has less of them, it needs to feed them faster (uses two hands) with more threads.
  4. Hyperthreading is a clever engineering trick Intel uses to allow one physical core to run two tasks at once (so each core appears as two to the OS). It's not as good as having two cores but can provide a boost over a single core in some circumstances.

    As to the general question, it's mainly about efficiency. Since Core 2 Duo Intel has steadily cranked out more performance per core per clock speed. That is, core for core a newer generation Intel core is faster than an older one at the same speed and faster than an AMD core of the same release year.
  5. SchizTech said:
    Hyperthreading is a clever engineering trick Intel uses to allow one physical core to run two tasks at once (so each core appears as two to the OS). It's not as good as having two cores but can provide a boost over a single core in some circumstances.

    As to the general question, it's mainly about efficiency. Since Core 2 Duo Intel has steadily cranked out more performance per core per clock speed. That is, core for core a newer generation Intel core is faster than an older one at the same speed and faster than an AMD core of the same release year.


    So would an FX-8350 Octo-Core with 4.0 Ghz clock be better than an i5 with 4.0 ghz because 8 Physical Cores is better than 4 Physical and 4 Virtual.
  6. Best answer
    Michaelscot9 said:
    SchizTech said:
    Hyperthreading is a clever engineering trick Intel uses to allow one physical core to run two tasks at once (so each core appears as two to the OS). It's not as good as having two cores but can provide a boost over a single core in some circumstances.

    As to the general question, it's mainly about efficiency. Since Core 2 Duo Intel has steadily cranked out more performance per core per clock speed. That is, core for core a newer generation Intel core is faster than an older one at the same speed and faster than an AMD core of the same release year.


    So would an FX-8350 Octo-Core with 4.0 Ghz clock be better than an i5 with 4.0 ghz because 8 Physical Cores is better than 4 Physical and 4 Virtual.


    and i5 does not have hyperthreading and therefore has 4 physical cores. The i3 has 2 physical and 2 virtual, the i7 has 4 physical and 4 virtual.

    Also they aren't actually virtual cores, they are just one core getting 2 feeds of information.
  7. The i5 does not have hyperthreading - it's just a quad core.

    Desktop i3 = hyperthreaded dual core (4 threads)
    Desktop i5 = quad core (4 threads)
    Desktop i7 = hyperthreaded quad core (8 threads)

    As to the specific question you could check benchmarks
  8. SchizTech said:
    The i5 does not have hyperthreading - it's just a quad core.

    Desktop i3 = hyperthreaded dual core (4 threads)
    Desktop i5 = quad core (4 threads)
    Desktop i7 = hyperthreaded quad core (8 threads)

    As to the specific question you could check benchmarks

    Okay, thanks guys that about answers it.
  9. The benchmarks are done without input from Intel. eg http://www.cpubenchmark.net/high_end_cpus.html

    You download the software and your pc is tested and the results are uploaded to the database. No tricks involved at all.
  10. The reason hyperthreading makes an Intel CPU better than an AMD, is because when you hyperthread a program, it runs multiple different threads of the program at the same time, having two processors working on the same program makes it run and load faster. while an AMD Fx- 8350 may be great with its Octo-core processing, an Intel quadcore with hyperthreading can use the virtual cores to process one program at twice the speed. A core with hyperthreading can offer up to a rough 30% improvement over a regular octo-core
  11. firen99 said:
    The reason hyperthreading makes an Intel CPU better than an AMD, is because when you hyperthread a program, it runs multiple different threads of the program at the same time, having two processors working on the same program makes it run and load faster. while an AMD Fx- 8350 may be great with its Octo-core processing, an Intel quadcore with hyperthreading can use the virtual cores to process one program at twice the speed. A core with hyperthreading can offer up to a rough 30% improvement over a regular octo-core


    You are incorrect, if what you were saying was true that would mean an i3 is better than an i5 because an i3 is two physical with hyperthreading whereas an i5 is 4 physical with no hyperthreading. Physical is always better than hyperthreading. Intels are better than AMDs because they have stronger single-core performance because of a higher transistor count and therefore they can perform more instructions in a single clock.
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