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A Wi-Fi Extender Vs A Powerline?

Tags:
  • Powerline
  • WiFi
  • Wireless Network
Last response: in Wireless Networking
May 5, 2014 2:14:32 AM

hey,

i recently installed a TP-LINK TL-WR841N router at my home. The problem is, I have a two storied house and I only get the Wi-Fi signal on the second floor of my house where the modem is kept. I need Wi-Fi on the first floor also. Luckily, the first floor has a double height ceiling which allows the second floor to be connected to the first via an open balcony kind of space. Now, I was planning on installing a Netgear WN3000RP Universal Wi-Fi Range Extender on the second floor where the router is, dead in the center of the floor where the signal is super. But, I have been advided that Wi-Fi extenders aren't that good and I should consider installing a Powerline. But, I feel that the Powerline will prove to be much more costlier than a Wi-Fi extender. Can someone help me on what I should do? Is a Wi-Fi extender good enough to get a good Wi-Fi signal all across the house or should I consider a powerline or something else?

More about : extender powerline

May 5, 2014 3:12:55 AM

Wi-Fi extenders share the bandwidth with the router, in other words, the Wi-Fi speeds are slower because its sharing the data between the router and the extender, where as the power line will simply act as a single device not sharing the bandwidth and its only using what it needs, also you get stronger signals with powerlines.
But be careful make sure the powerline is connected to the same switch and power circuit as the router in the house.
Hope this helps!
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May 5, 2014 5:10:22 AM

hey, thanks a lot Hjgrove for your reply. I feel I will go with a Wi-Fi extender to avoid costs. I hope it works out well for me.
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May 5, 2014 5:21:11 AM

Its ok, It should easily fill up that blank spot in your house.
Hope all goes well!
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May 5, 2014 5:30:25 AM

The main issue with a repeater is that it in effect is talking at the same time as the route and end devices and they in effect jam each other. You can expect a 50% minimum drop in speed and at high traffic loads much higher.

Can you get a ethernet cable run to the open area and put a AP at that location. A AP is sorta also a repeater but it gets the main signal over a cable so it does not compete for bandwidth.

A note on extenders/repeaters. The really cheap ones don't work as well moderate priced ones. The best repeaters have 2 independent radios one to talk to the router and a second to talk to the end users. Since these are on different bands or at least channels they do not suffer the same degradation of speed but you still have 2 wireless conversations susceptible to all the normal interference issues.
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Best solution

May 5, 2014 5:43:12 AM

bill001g said:
The main issue with a repeater is that it in effect is talking at the same time as the route and end devices and they in effect jam each other. You can expect a 50% minimum drop in speed and at high traffic loads much higher.

Can you get a ethernet cable run to the open area and put a AP at that location. A AP is sorta also a repeater but it gets the main signal over a cable so it does not compete for bandwidth.

A note on extenders/repeaters. The really cheap ones don't work as well moderate priced ones. The best repeaters have 2 independent radios one to talk to the router and a second to talk to the end users. Since these are on different bands or at least channels they do not suffer the same degradation of speed but you still have 2 wireless conversations susceptible to all the normal interference issues.


The only reason the AP wouldn't be the best is because having a wire running though the house is a bit of a pain.
That would be the best option but its not ideal for everyone ;) 
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May 5, 2014 9:49:30 AM

Hjgrove said:


The only reason the AP wouldn't be the best is because having a wire running though the house is a bit of a pain.
That would be the best option but its not ideal for everyone ;) 


IMO, a short term pain is worth the long term pleasure of solid, no-fuss WiFi.
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May 5, 2014 11:39:50 AM

Pooneil said:
Hjgrove said:


The only reason the AP wouldn't be the best is because having a wire running though the house is a bit of a pain.
That would be the best option but its not ideal for everyone ;) 


IMO, a short term pain is worth the long term pleasure of solid, no-fuss WiFi.


Well, its not ideal for everyone. Just use power line instead, it will send the Ethernet signal via the powerline.
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May 13, 2014 11:17:02 PM

thanks a lot Hjgrove, bill001g & Pooneil. appretiate it!
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