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Switching from Laptop to Gaming pc, future build for 2500 or under

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May 10, 2014 12:45:15 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: e.g.: Future, this is more of a reference for future builds

Budget Range: 2500 or so

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming at high settings

Are you buying a monitor: Yes

Do you need to buy OS: Yes

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg if possible

Location: California, USA

Parts Preferences: Intel is fine

Overclocking: Maybe

SLI or Crossfire: No

Your Monitor Resolution: I use 1920x1080, bigger is fine

Additional Comments: Enough space to be able to upgrade, powerful enough to last a few years with only needed upgrades as they come. SSD ect

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: I needed a laptop so I could do the things I needed to do while keeping an eye on my autistic daughter, but she is now going to school so I have more time to myself. I'd like to have a pc that can play the latest games at fairly high settings, sound is unimportant to me. I don't want to overclock or have SLI/Crossfire.. just a solid build I can work towards.

The pc being big enough to accommodate upgrades after purchase is a must.

My current laptop is a MSI GE70
http://www.msi.com/product/nb/GE70_0NC.html

So better than this would be nice.
a b 4 Gaming
May 10, 2014 1:46:55 PM

I know 750W is overkill but the price difference between 750 and 650 is the same.
An i7 is also overkill for gaming but it is within your budget to get one. You will be perfectly fine with an i5 4670.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($299.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock H87 Performance ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($121.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($71.10 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($139.00 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($56.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB DirectCU II Video Card ($689.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair 750D ATX Full Tower Case ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
Power Supply: SeaSonic G-750 750W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-14 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Asus VN248H 23.8" Monitor ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1863.97
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-05-10 16:46 EDT-0400)
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a b 4 Gaming
May 10, 2014 1:59:46 PM

Here is a good build. All the parts will be from Newegg. The 290X will be enough for your needs and costs way less than the 780ti which was suggested earlier. Also, there is no need for you to get an i7 as it is not worth the extra $100 unless you are video editing. With the extra money saved, you could get 3 27" monitors and game with exprience

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($234.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Asus Z87-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R9 290X 4GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($549.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 550D ATX Mid Tower Case ($107.00 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($136.50 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-14 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($102.98 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VE247H 23.6" Monitor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1658.38
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-05-10 17:01 EDT-0400)
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May 11, 2014 8:21:10 AM

Those both are some awesome ideas, but some of them are currently unavailable, or have some bad reviews. Is there any more ideas?
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a b 4 Gaming
May 11, 2014 8:27:42 AM

Well those are the best as of right now. The parts that are unavailable, you can buy from tiger direct or some other provider. Bad reviews don't matter that much. Have you read some of them? They are usually complaining about shipping problems or how the package arrived. Very few of them, are about the product itself. And, since you live in California, you can go to Newegg headquarters and get your stuff from there, that is an option on the newegg website.
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May 11, 2014 8:43:29 AM

Yeah, I heard about that - It's in the City of Industry, kinda near Irvine I think? or Anaheim?

I just want to have a solid pc, I've built some in the way past, when gpu were tiny little green things.
Now I just want to stay current without too much trouble. Thanks for taking the time to answer me though!
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a b 4 Gaming
May 11, 2014 10:24:46 AM

Your welcome! Happy building!
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!