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Why are my games flickering in full-screen mode?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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May 10, 2014 6:19:53 PM

Many of my games flicker or crash in full-screen mode. Some of the examples of the flickering include Crayon Physics, Super Hexagon, and a few others that aren't graphically demanding at all. It isn't tearing, the screen is flashing frames of black for some reason. Other games, such as Batman Arkham City don't do this. Crysis 2 also crashes on the first mission, when my rig should be capable of running it. I have deleted the nvidia folder, and reinstalled the drivers and this didn't help. It does this whether I am using 1 video card or SLI, and I have used a program called DriverPack Solution to update all of my drivers. Does this sound like a hardware problem or software? I am connected to my TV via an HDMI cable but both the TV and the cable work perfectly in most cases. I just am tired of crashing games and flashing screens. Any help is appreciated.

Update: I ended up getting the flashing games to work by going to the properties of the .exe files for the games and disabling dpi scaling. It was causing this TV in particular to freak out. Many thanks to those who helped!

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a b U Graphics card
May 10, 2014 6:23:26 PM

A quick thing you may want to try is using a different monitor or using the monitor on a different computer... just to eliminate the possibility that the monitor is the cause.
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May 10, 2014 6:43:16 PM

KevinAr18 said:
A quick thing you may want to try is using a different monitor or using the monitor on a different computer... just to eliminate the possibility that the monitor is the cause.


I just tried doing that and it didn't help unfortunately. Thanks for the idea though. Any other thoughts?
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a b U Graphics card
May 10, 2014 6:46:56 PM

It is possible that "DriverPack Solution" is the cause of the problem. It may not be a good idea to let some 3rd party program try and update the drivers for you.

1. Uninstall DriverPack
2. Completely remove all Nvidia and/or AMD drivers and software.
3. Go to AMD or Nvidia (depending on what card you have) and download the latest drivers for your video card and install them.
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May 10, 2014 6:51:10 PM

KevinAr18 said:
It is possible that "DriverPack Solution" is the cause of the problem. It may not be a good idea to let some 3rd party program try and update the drivers for you.

1. Uninstall DriverPack
2. Completely remove all Nvidia and/or AMD drivers and software.
3. Go to AMD or Nvidia (depending on what card you have) and download the latest drivers for your video card and install them.


I tried that too earlier, just forgot to mention it. I didn't have the program installed on my pc, it was on my external hard drive and I ran it from there. I had the problem before I ever used the program though. Not sure what is causing it. Thanks for trying though.
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a b U Graphics card
May 10, 2014 6:53:57 PM

Is it possible that your OS install itself has gotten messed up? (long shot, I know)

If you record video of the game, does it record the flicker too?
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May 10, 2014 7:04:42 PM

KevinAr18 said:
Is it possible that your OS install itself has gotten messed up? (long shot, I know)

If you record video of the game, does it record the flicker too?


That was a smart move, I wouldn't have thought of the video. Recording with fraps actually doesn't show the flashing screen in super hexagon (not demanding at all) but it is showing me having 15-20 fps and you can tell the frames are skipping pretty bad. Any ideas based on that? As for the OS install, I wouldn't know how to check.
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a b U Graphics card
May 10, 2014 7:11:04 PM

Crayon Physics and Super Hexagon appear like they may be games that rely on the CPU more than the video card.
It's possible you may have a CPU issue or some other system/software issue.

Maybe monitor the speed and temperature of the CPU to see if it is actually running a full speed and/or if it is overheating?
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May 10, 2014 7:26:29 PM

KevinAr18 said:
Crayon Physics and Super Hexagon appear like they may be games that rely on the CPU more than the video card.
It's possible you may have a CPU issue or some other system/software issue.

Maybe monitor the speed and temperature of the CPU to see if it is actually running a full speed and/or if it is overheating?
\

I put my CPU at stock clock and monitored it. Temps are good, clock is showing correct speed, but games are still not running right. I was getting a fairly large amount of blue screens after I upgraded to windows 8. Any way to tell if the OS is stable?

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a b U Graphics card
May 10, 2014 7:31:05 PM

If you are getting blue screens, then it may be reporting the details of what is going on.

* Right click on "Computer" and select "properties". Go to Advanced System Settings (which opens System Properties) > [Advanced] tab > under "Startup and Recovery" category, pick "Settings..."
* Make sure "Write an event to system log" is checked and "Kernal memory" dump is selected. The dump file location is probably listed as "%SystemRoot%\MEMORY.DMP ... which is the C:\Windows directory.
* If all of this is already turn on, then go looking for the C:\Windows\MEMORY.DMP file.
* If it was not setup this way already, then you may need to wait for the next blue screen to occur.

Once you have the crash dump, this page explains how to read it:
http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Analyze-a-BSOD-C...
The instructions have two pages. When you get to the second page, and click on the analyze link to get the detailed results, post it here if you want.
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a b U Graphics card
May 10, 2014 7:35:23 PM

BTW, another thing you can also check on is the Event Log.
Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Event Viewer > Windows Logs > System
especially the "critical", warnings, and errors.

However, since you have blue screens, the crash dump can sometimes tell you almost exactly what the source of the blue screen was (although sometimes it's too vague to figure out).
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May 10, 2014 7:36:11 PM

hi,

are you currently using Gpu in SLI configuration?

if so, a lot games has stability issues with it, especially older titles. but mostly can be fixed with having the latest driver update.

what gpu do you have?
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May 11, 2014 12:29:25 PM

KevinAr18 said:
BTW, another thing you can also check on is the Event Log.
Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Event Viewer > Windows Logs > System
especially the "critical", warnings, and errors.

However, since you have blue screens, the crash dump can sometimes tell you almost exactly what the source of the blue screen was (although sometimes it's too vague to figure out).


This error occured many times when I upgraded from Windows 7. Any ideas? By many times, it literally shows it thousands of times in a row.

The machine-default permission settings do not grant Local Activation permission for the COM Server application with CLSID
{C2F03A33-21F5-47FA-B4BB-156362A2F239}
and APPID
{316CDED5-E4AE-4B15-9113-7055D84DCC97}
to the user NT AUTHORITY\LOCAL SERVICE SID (S-1-5-19) from address LocalHost (Using LRPC) running in the application container Unavailable SID (Unavailable). This security permission can be modified using the Component Services administrative tool.

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a b U Graphics card
May 12, 2014 11:25:57 AM

If you are getting constant errors, it could potentially be software or the OS tying up your computer's time.

We could try fixing individual errors, but, really, the best option at this point, would be to perform a 100% clean install of Windows. Reformat the entire drive and install Windows new.

* If your system used a restore drive or CD, then use that method to reinstall everything. However, since you mentioned that you upgraded to Windows 8, you will probably just want to install Windows 8 directly and then enter whatever information it asks for to confirm you owned a previous version of Windows (assuming it lets you upgrade this way; I'm not sure if it does).

After installing Windows, you will want to go find all the latest drivers for your system.

If it is a pre-built system, consult the manufacturer's website.

If it is custom built.
1. motherboard - find the support page for your exact motherboard model and look for drivers for it. It will probably include a range of drivers such as SATA, sound, chipset, LAN, wireless, etc.... and maybe even a BIOS update.
2. Get the video card drivers directly from AMD, Nvidia, or Intel (not any other company/site)
3. Optionally, if you know the chipset your motherboard uses, it may be better to get the latest chipset drivers from Intel instead of from the motherboard manufacturer's website, but I don't know for sure.
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