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Asus Maximus VII Ranger vs Hero

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  • Asus
  • Intel i7
  • Motherboards
Last response: in Motherboards
May 11, 2014 11:53:02 PM

I was wondering if anyone who really understands the specs jargon what do I miss out onif I get the Ranger?
Looking at futureproofing a i7-4770K

Thanks

More about : asus maximus vii ranger hero

a c 406 V Motherboard
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May 12, 2014 12:03:56 AM

I don't normally bother with ROG boards. Overpriced and there's nothing you'll get out of them that a good ~$130 board won't give you.

You may want to wait a month or two for Devil's Canyon to come out, if you're OCing.
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a b V Motherboard
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May 12, 2014 12:23:17 AM

The Hero is a little bit better. Has some extra SATA ports and a M PCIE port. Has extra overclocking software. Better audio. And a better power source for the microprocessor.

The ROG are optimum for overclocking. It is easier and should give you better results. I agree you want to wait til early June for the Devil's Canyon Haswell's. You should be able to get them up to 5GHz. And just look at the motherboards, ROG vs the others. You can see ROG has far better components, bigger regulators and heatsinks. You get what you pay for.
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May 12, 2014 12:25:14 AM

Thanks for info. I already have the CPU and will be going a black and red scheme. So will buy either the VI or VII hero.
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a c 406 V Motherboard
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May 12, 2014 12:50:36 AM

I still really don't see the point in ROG...

Get an MSI Z87-G45 Gaming if you want red/black, and I'd imagine that there's a Z97 version about to arrive.
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a b V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
May 12, 2014 1:00:32 AM

Someone Somewhere said:
I still really don't see the point in ROG...

Get an MSI Z87-G45 Gaming if you want red/black, and I'd imagine that there's a Z97 version about to arrive.


ROG has many improvements.

RAM Cache for HDD

larger, better regulators for the CPU resulting in smoother power allowing the CPU to go faster many times.

Really advanced software to automate overclocking as much as possible.

top quality components on the motherboard for longer life

More cooling thicker board, just look at the boards, especially in person, the ROG's just drip with quality.
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a c 406 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
May 12, 2014 1:02:05 AM

And I can show you Monster cables with gold-plated everything, extra shielding, and all sorts of other crap. Doesn't mean they perform better, or are worth the cost.
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a b V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
May 12, 2014 1:07:15 AM

Wait, wait, . . . you're right! I feel that stupidity simply exiting my brain.

;o
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a c 406 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
May 12, 2014 1:13:36 AM

Sarcasm?
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a b V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
June 9, 2014 4:24:02 PM

The only board in the rog lines that I think are relevant is the formula because of that armor. I know the sabertooths have it too but it looks so much nicer on the formula (and this is only because of looks, not function). Price/performance the z97-a is the best because it can overclock, sli, and its reasonably cheap.
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a b V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
June 9, 2014 6:04:15 PM

babernet_1 said:
The Hero is a little bit better. Has some extra SATA ports and a M PCIE port. Has extra overclocking software. Better audio. And a better power source for the microprocessor.

The ROG are optimum for overclocking. It is easier and should give you better results. I agree you want to wait til early June for the Devil's Canyon Haswell's. You should be able to get them up to 5GHz. And just look at the motherboards, ROG vs the others. You can see ROG has far better components, bigger regulators and heatsinks. You get what you pay for.


babernet_1 said:
Someone Somewhere said:
I still really don't see the point in ROG...

Get an MSI Z87-G45 Gaming if you want red/black, and I'd imagine that there's a Z97 version about to arrive.


ROG has many improvements.

RAM Cache for HDD

larger, better regulators for the CPU resulting in smoother power allowing the CPU to go faster many times.

Really advanced software to automate overclocking as much as possible.

top quality components on the motherboard for longer life

More cooling thicker board, just look at the boards, especially in person, the ROG's just drip with quality.


Bigger regulators doesn't mean better efficiency.

Lets compare VII HERO with a tad cheaper board like MSI z97 Gaming 7 (since the OP wants a red black scheme).

1- HERO has digitally controlled 8 true phase. Controller is from IR probably. I said probably since Asus decided to hide the manufacturer/specs and rename the controller for some weird reason.

Gaming 7 on the other hand has digitally controlled 6 true phases doubled to 12. Controller is from Intersil (6388). This is the first digital controller from good old Intersil (they been doing hybrid controllers before).

You might think that 8 true phase is better and more efficient than 6 phases doubled to 12. And you might be right on the paper. But actually other components of the VRM will decide that. Morever with quality components MSI's design here is more costly and harder to apply. (you'll understand if you know about vrms)

2- For the mosfets. HERO employs 8X Nexfet powerblocks from Texas Instruments. Which can do 40A@6.5w.

Gaming 7 employs 12x powerpaks from Nikos. They can do roughly 30 to 38-39A@6.5W. They seem tad less efficient than Nexfets, but there are actually 12 of them which means less load and better heat dissipation.

3- What about chokes (inductors)? Well you were mentioning those bigger regulators, right?

HERO has 8 of those 60amp alloy chokes.

Gaming 7 has 12 of super ferrite chokes which are rated at 60 amp as well.

So it's very clear that Gaming 7 has more power output potential. And also size not matters. :) 

4- Hero has 10k rated top quality solid polymer caps. Not sure about the manufacturer though but they are probably some custom made caps by one of the japanese guys. But 10K is kind of standard even in lower price ranges now. Gigabyte also using 10K Chemi-con caps even on their enty level z87/z97 solutions.

Gaming 7 has some of those tantalum filled, low profile highly conductive solid caps for cpu vrm area. They are probably manufactured by Panasonic. They are a lot more efficient than our solid caps and run cooler. Also rated at 160k hours @ 85C. Rest of the caps are also some custom made solid caps. Not sure about their ratings though since MSI didn't bother to give exact details here (according to their marketing it has 5x longer lifespan than normal caps which tells us it might be 10k)

So... All in all you can't tell HERO is better just looking at the board. Component-wise they are very close and Gaming 7 has some tiny bit more advantages.

Today a VRM is not the only selling point for a motherboard though. So in the end it's the extra features which convince us more.

Ah by the way about those onboard audio solutions.

Asus's SupremeFX is just a marketing gimmick and it's actually a renamed Realtek ALC1150 codec. Most of the z87 and z97 boards have the same codec. Of couse HERO employs some emi shielding, pcb seperation and high quality caps at that area but all the boards at that price range have these stuff as well. Moreover MSI and Gigabyte's gaming boards employ better audio caps which are from Nichicon. These are the exact same caps we used to see on studio grade audio solutions.

Well, hope I could clarify that confusion about "size matters" thingy.
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July 21, 2014 6:50:15 AM

Asus motherboards very overpriced here (Malaysia) except the Maximus VII Ranger.
Maximus VII Hero is RM919 while Maximus VII Ranger is RM699
To answer the OP, the difference between Hero and Ranger is:
- 2x Extra SATA ports for the Hero
- Better VRM (True 8 phase power design)
- Red and Black PCB (which are subjective anyway)

Don't think the price paying for Hero is worth it.
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January 2, 2015 4:00:42 PM

feelingtheblanks said:
babernet_1 said:
The Hero is a little bit better. Has some extra SATA ports and a M PCIE port. Has extra overclocking software. Better audio. And a better power source for the microprocessor.

The ROG are optimum for overclocking. It is easier and should give you better results. I agree you want to wait til early June for the Devil's Canyon Haswell's. You should be able to get them up to 5GHz. And just look at the motherboards, ROG vs the others. You can see ROG has far better components, bigger regulators and heatsinks. You get what you pay for.


babernet_1 said:
Someone Somewhere said:
I still really don't see the point in ROG...

Get an MSI Z87-G45 Gaming if you want red/black, and I'd imagine that there's a Z97 version about to arrive.


ROG has many improvements.

RAM Cache for HDD

larger, better regulators for the CPU resulting in smoother power allowing the CPU to go faster many times.

Really advanced software to automate overclocking as much as possible.

top quality components on the motherboard for longer life

More cooling thicker board, just look at the boards, especially in person, the ROG's just drip with quality.


Bigger regulators doesn't mean better efficiency.

Lets compare VII HERO with a tad cheaper board like MSI z97 Gaming 7 (since the OP wants a red black scheme).

1- HERO has digitally controlled 8 true phase. Controller is from IR probably. I said probably since Asus decided to hide the manufacturer/specs and rename the controller for some weird reason.

Gaming 7 on the other hand has digitally controlled 6 true phases doubled to 12. Controller is from Intersil (6388). This is the first digital controller from good old Intersil (they been doing hybrid controllers before).

You might think that 8 true phase is better and more efficient than 6 phases doubled to 12. And you might be right on the paper. But actually other components of the VRM will decide that. Morever with quality components MSI's design here is more costly and harder to apply. (you'll understand if you know about vrms)

2- For the mosfets. HERO employs 8X Nexfet powerblocks from Texas Instruments. Which can do 40A@6.5w.

Gaming 7 employs 12x powerpaks from Nikos. They can do roughly 30 to 38-39A@6.5W. They seem tad less efficient than Nexfets, but there are actually 12 of them which means less load and better heat dissipation.

3- What about chokes (inductors)? Well you were mentioning those bigger regulators, right?

HERO has 8 of those 60amp alloy chokes.

Gaming 7 has 12 of super ferrite chokes which are rated at 60 amp as well.

So it's very clear that Gaming 7 has more power output potential. And also size not matters. :) 

4- Hero has 10k rated top quality solid polymer caps. Not sure about the manufacturer though but they are probably some custom made caps by one of the japanese guys. But 10K is kind of standard even in lower price ranges now. Gigabyte also using 10K Chemi-con caps even on their enty level z87/z97 solutions.

Gaming 7 has some of those tantalum filled, low profile highly conductive solid caps for cpu vrm area. They are probably manufactured by Panasonic. They are a lot more efficient than our solid caps and run cooler. Also rated at 160k hours @ 85C. Rest of the caps are also some custom made solid caps. Not sure about their ratings though since MSI didn't bother to give exact details here (according to their marketing it has 5x longer lifespan than normal caps which tells us it might be 10k)

So... All in all you can't tell HERO is better just looking at the board. Component-wise they are very close and Gaming 7 has some tiny bit more advantages.

Today a VRM is not the only selling point for a motherboard though. So in the end it's the extra features which convince us more.

Ah by the way about those onboard audio solutions.

Asus's SupremeFX is just a marketing gimmick and it's actually a renamed Realtek ALC1150 codec. Most of the z87 and z97 boards have the same codec. Of couse HERO employs some emi shielding, pcb seperation and high quality caps at that area but all the boards at that price range have these stuff as well. Moreover MSI and Gigabyte's gaming boards employ better audio caps which are from Nichicon. These are the exact same caps we used to see on studio grade audio solutions.

Well, hope I could clarify that confusion about "size matters" thingy.





Incredible review, nice information too, very important to know about the power delivery.

What about the Asrock Z97 Fatal1ty Professional? Im in doubt to buy one of this boards, the hero or fatal1ty... But i cant find reviews about that... Only know the asrock has 12 phase power, but dont realy know about others components that u mentioned...

Can u help me to decide?

Thanks a lot!!!
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February 13, 2015 10:35:21 PM

feelingtheblanks said:
babernet_1 said:
The Hero is a little bit better. Has some extra SATA ports and a M PCIE port. Has extra overclocking software. Better audio. And a better power source for the microprocessor.

The ROG are optimum for overclocking. It is easier and should give you better results. I agree you want to wait til early June for the Devil's Canyon Haswell's. You should be able to get them up to 5GHz. And just look at the motherboards, ROG vs the others. You can see ROG has far better components, bigger regulators and heatsinks. You get what you pay for.


babernet_1 said:
Someone Somewhere said:
I still really don't see the point in ROG...

Get an MSI Z87-G45 Gaming if you want red/black, and I'd imagine that there's a Z97 version about to arrive.


ROG has many improvements.

RAM Cache for HDD

larger, better regulators for the CPU resulting in smoother power allowing the CPU to go faster many times.

Really advanced software to automate overclocking as much as possible.

top quality components on the motherboard for longer life

More cooling thicker board, just look at the boards, especially in person, the ROG's just drip with quality.


Bigger regulators doesn't mean better efficiency.

Lets compare VII HERO with a tad cheaper board like MSI z97 Gaming 7 (since the OP wants a red black scheme).

1- HERO has digitally controlled 8 true phase. Controller is from IR probably. I said probably since Asus decided to hide the manufacturer/specs and rename the controller for some weird reason.

Gaming 7 on the other hand has digitally controlled 6 true phases doubled to 12. Controller is from Intersil (6388). This is the first digital controller from good old Intersil (they been doing hybrid controllers before).

You might think that 8 true phase is better and more efficient than 6 phases doubled to 12. And you might be right on the paper. But actually other components of the VRM will decide that. Morever with quality components MSI's design here is more costly and harder to apply. (you'll understand if you know about vrms)

2- For the mosfets. HERO employs 8X Nexfet powerblocks from Texas Instruments. Which can do 40A@6.5w.

Gaming 7 employs 12x powerpaks from Nikos. They can do roughly 30 to 38-39A@6.5W. They seem tad less efficient than Nexfets, but there are actually 12 of them which means less load and better heat dissipation.

3- What about chokes (inductors)? Well you were mentioning those bigger regulators, right?

HERO has 8 of those 60amp alloy chokes.

Gaming 7 has 12 of super ferrite chokes which are rated at 60 amp as well.

So it's very clear that Gaming 7 has more power output potential. And also size not matters. :) 

4- Hero has 10k rated top quality solid polymer caps. Not sure about the manufacturer though but they are probably some custom made caps by one of the japanese guys. But 10K is kind of standard even in lower price ranges now. Gigabyte also using 10K Chemi-con caps even on their enty level z87/z97 solutions.

Gaming 7 has some of those tantalum filled, low profile highly conductive solid caps for cpu vrm area. They are probably manufactured by Panasonic. They are a lot more efficient than our solid caps and run cooler. Also rated at 160k hours @ 85C. Rest of the caps are also some custom made solid caps. Not sure about their ratings though since MSI didn't bother to give exact details here (according to their marketing it has 5x longer lifespan than normal caps which tells us it might be 10k)

So... All in all you can't tell HERO is better just looking at the board. Component-wise they are very close and Gaming 7 has some tiny bit more advantages.

Today a VRM is not the only selling point for a motherboard though. So in the end it's the extra features which convince us more.

Ah by the way about those onboard audio solutions.

Asus's SupremeFX is just a marketing gimmick and it's actually a renamed Realtek ALC1150 codec. Most of the z87 and z97 boards have the same codec. Of couse HERO employs some emi shielding, pcb seperation and high quality caps at that area but all the boards at that price range have these stuff as well. Moreover MSI and Gigabyte's gaming boards employ better audio caps which are from Nichicon. These are the exact same caps we used to see on studio grade audio solutions.

Well, hope I could clarify that confusion about "size matters" thingy.


I have Maximus V Formula with 3770K and Dominator Pltinum 16GB 1866MHz. From Last two years (approx) I am running my CPU at 4.5GHz and RAM 2000MHz 24x7 with out a single time failure.
But previously I had Gigabyte Z68 highend board with 2500K, but I am facing lot faliure like Blue screen of Death, OC failed at start up.

So my simple realiazation from my experience is that ROG board are made for true Over Clock...
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March 2, 2015 10:07:57 AM

RenatoFX Hats off well explained am going for gameing 7
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March 25, 2015 6:15:46 AM

Thanks for all the great replies.

I ended up getting a Hero VII in June 2014, but didn't build my computer til November.... since then I found out that one of the USB ports (BIOS Flashback) doesn't work like a regular port. After discussions with ASUS they reckon the board is faulty. Fantastic, so this weekend I have to pull my whole build apart so I can get a replacement motherboard. :( 

At least with the warranty I can get a working M/B, but geeez that Coolermaster V8 CPU fan is a PITA to put on/ take off!
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May 19, 2016 12:30:30 PM

My 20+ years overclocking, I have noticed most budget overclocking board will get roughly the overclock as high end boards, providing they both have exceptional power supplies. You need good power going in or you won't get much of an over clock, but high end boards usually achieve a little better overclock from good chips on the board and regulators on board.

But I find the only good reason to get the high end boards is for extreme overclocking. Those liquid cooler nitrogen systems can really push the motherboard to it's limits. But that's for playing rather than real life use. so only a handful of people should be buying those boards. The rest basically just wasting money on market hype.

As for longevity, usually the technologies will outdate a board before it dies anyway. I've never had a bad motherboard die, except of my own accord or faulty to begin with.

tl;dr budget boards do as good of job as high end board in 99% of cases. If you have to ask, buy a budget board with features you need or want. You'll know if you need a high end board.
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May 19, 2016 4:09:21 PM

Two year old thread...
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