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What do cores in processor actually mean ?

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May 13, 2014 7:13:30 AM

I've been wondering a lot lately, what does cores mean actually in processors ? What will increase if the cores are increased ? And how can dual core like and I3 beat an amd quad core product or an intel core 2 quad ? And even though some high end amd processors have octa cores, they are equal to an I5, why ?

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May 13, 2014 7:31:34 AM

Malnimzz said:
I've been wondering a lot lately, what does cores mean actually in processors ? What will increase if the cores are increased ? And how can dual core like and I3 beat an amd quad core product or an intel core 2 quad ? And even though some high end amd processors have octa cores, they are equal to an I5, why ?


Okay, first, when it comes to performance, AMD is still lagging behind Intel and the reason ssome seemingly lower end Intels can keep with a seeming High end AMD. An i3 IS dual core, but has HT ( Hyperthreading ) so essentially you have 4 virtual cores When you increase the number of cores, it will increase the overall performance. It used to be, you only had a single core processor, then someboudy figured out that you could add another Core ( sort of like having two processors ). AMD had a Tri Core at one time, but I think it was actually a quad Core with one core locked. INtel will soon be coming out with an Octacore Processor. Are Hex Cores and Octa cores really needed? In most day to day operations, no. Quadcore is plenty. As for why an i5 will perform equally or better than an AMD Octacore, It own't in somne things that require multithreading, as for over all performance, AMD has some catching up to do and they used to be the #1 Chip. If you are on a budget and want to build a decent machine, you can get a good AMD CPU that you will be happy with and do what you want it to do. In most cases, all that performance stuff is only seen in Benchmarks. If you were sitting there playing a game, you probably wouldn't see it.
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May 13, 2014 7:32:13 AM

You would be better off reading up on it on wikipedia. Basically 'core' = computers brain where processing happens. More cores = more computing power.
Not all cores are the same!
Just cos Processor A has 4 cores and Processor B has 2 cores.. certain workloads might be more suited to B, making B a better processor for that usage scenario.
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May 13, 2014 7:35:09 AM

I'm not so sure hyper threading is available on i3.. apart from that you're spot on!
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May 22, 2014 7:06:15 AM

ktolo said:
I'm not so sure hyper threading is available on i3.. apart from that you're spot on!


It is on the one I have in my Laptop.
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May 22, 2014 7:09:31 AM

Thanks for the update!! It seems it was introduced for the current 4th gen chips..
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May 22, 2014 7:28:38 AM

ktolo said:
Thanks for the update!! It seems it was introduced for the current 4th gen chips..


It is an i3 2310 running at 2.1 Ghz and not a current gen. It was bought in Dec. '11. It is just something I got for mobilty, as I don't much like using my cell for that stuff. Came in handy when I was in the hospital after having a massive Heart Attack. I was able to stay in touch with folks. :) 
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May 22, 2014 7:31:12 AM

Ah ok! Wrong again! That's what i get for only half assed googling something!
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May 22, 2014 7:57:16 AM

ktolo said:
Ah ok! Wrong again! That's what i get for only half assed googling something!


You have to be careful with that google stuff as you can get some erroneous information. I double checked mine to be sure and when I opened up the performance tab in Task Manager, it showed four windows and not two ( 8 on the i7 4770k I have in here ). As far as i know, most of those i3's have HT. I installed Oblivion on that thing for giggles and was surprised at how well it ran and on the Integrated graphics ( HD 2000 I think ).
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