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Need Suggestions For New Build

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May 15, 2014 6:14:04 AM

So, I have this new build at hand and wanted to know IF it would work and HOW it would work. The following links give the list of components-
http://www.flipkart.com/wishlist/yatharthmoza04-2516
https://www.snapdeal.com/wishlist/user?u=yatharthmoza04...

The main things I would like answers to is how this build would perform and the airflow inside it.I plan to put the h100i above the mobo in the cabinet with the stock fans OUTSIDE the cabinet (h100i stock fans) and the 120mm cooler master fans (two) INSIDE doing a push and pull.I've heard that there isn't much space left if I do this for the stock exhaust on the cabinet and will put the exhaust outside the cabinet.Besides that , another pair of the cooler master 120mm will work as intakes in the front part of the cabinet. Last but not the least, I'll put the 140mm cooler master on the transparent side panel(not sure how that would look). I want to know if this would work and how it would work/look. I'm following a green theme as you may have noticed and want to continue that way.Feel free to drop suggestions ( for performance AND look enhancement).
Ps.- It's obviously a gaming build.
PPs.- I also plan on having dual monitors and a crossfire GPU config.
PPPs.- I also plan on OCing.

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a b À AMD
May 15, 2014 7:11:38 AM

I do not much like your plan.

1. Here is my canned rant on planning for dual cards:
-----------------------------Start of rant----------------------------------------------------
Dual graphics cards vs. a good single card.

a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX650/ti or 7770 can give you good performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX660 or 7850 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single gtx690,7990, GTX780ti or R9-290X is about as good as it gets for a single card.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, or a 4k monitor, might sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards and stronger single card solutions.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX660 needs a 430w psu, even a GTX780 only needs a 575w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 200w to your psu requirements.

Even the most power hungry GTX690 only needs 620w, or a 7990 needs 700w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual gpu's do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual gpu support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) dual cards up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.
The high end Maxwell and amd 8000 or 9000 series are due the end of the year or next year.
-------------------------------End of rant-----------------------------------------------------------

I would plan on a single great card like a GTX770 or a R9-280X.

2. Few games can use more than 2-3 cores, FSX and BF3/4 in multiplayer mode are one of the few exceptions.
That makes 8 cores of a FX8500 largely useless. At your price point, look for a intel haswell quad.

3. You buy a liquid cooler to be able to extract an extra multiplier or two out of your OC.
How much do you really need?
I do not much like all in one liquid coolers when a good air cooler like a Noctua NH-D14 or phanteks can do the job just as well.
A liquid cooler will be expensive, noisy, less reliable, and will not cool any better
in a well ventilated case.
Liquid cooling is really air cooling, it just puts the heat exchange in a different place.
The orientation of the radiator will cause a problem.
If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside, you will cool the cpu better, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card and motherboard.
If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better) , then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.
And... I have read too many tales of woe when a liquid cooler leaks.
google "H100 leak"

4. Instead of spending money on parts for overclocking, spend the money on faster parts to begin with. Buying a factory overclocked graphics card is usually a fair value.

5. Fans do not cool; a pc does not sweat. Fans move air.
How much air movement is needed for airflow to a graphics card and cpu cooler? two 120mm fans or a single 200mm fan in the front of your case will do the job.
If thise fans are filtered, your case will stay cleaner with a positive pressure situation. At least start out with the stock fans and see how you do.
PC parts can tolerate a fair amount of heat without damage or loss of performance.

6. I know of no games that use dual monitors; I expect that you will be gaming on one and using the other as a side monitor, In that case, the side monitor adds little to the gpu load.
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May 15, 2014 10:10:52 AM

geofelt said:
I do not much like your plan.

1. Here is my canned rant on planning for dual cards:
-----------------------------Start of rant----------------------------------------------------
Dual graphics cards vs. a good single card.

a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX650/ti or 7770 can give you good performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX660 or 7850 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single gtx690,7990, GTX780ti or R9-290X is about as good as it gets for a single card.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, or a 4k monitor, might sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards and stronger single card solutions.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX660 needs a 430w psu, even a GTX780 only needs a 575w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 200w to your psu requirements.

Even the most power hungry GTX690 only needs 620w, or a 7990 needs 700w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual gpu's do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual gpu support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) dual cards up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.
The high end Maxwell and amd 8000 or 9000 series are due the end of the year or next year.
-------------------------------End of rant-----------------------------------------------------------

I would plan on a single great card like a GTX770 or a R9-280X.

2. Few games can use more than 2-3 cores, FSX and BF3/4 in multiplayer mode are one of the few exceptions.
That makes 8 cores of a FX8500 largely useless. At your price point, look for a intel haswell quad.

3. You buy a liquid cooler to be able to extract an extra multiplier or two out of your OC.
How much do you really need?
I do not much like all in one liquid coolers when a good air cooler like a Noctua NH-D14 or phanteks can do the job just as well.
A liquid cooler will be expensive, noisy, less reliable, and will not cool any better
in a well ventilated case.
Liquid cooling is really air cooling, it just puts the heat exchange in a different place.
The orientation of the radiator will cause a problem.
If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside, you will cool the cpu better, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card and motherboard.
If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better) , then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.
And... I have read too many tales of woe when a liquid cooler leaks.
google "H100 leak"

4. Instead of spending money on parts for overclocking, spend the money on faster parts to begin with. Buying a factory overclocked graphics card is usually a fair value.

5. Fans do not cool; a pc does not sweat. Fans move air.
How much air movement is needed for airflow to a graphics card and cpu cooler? two 120mm fans or a single 200mm fan in the front of your case will do the job.
If thise fans are filtered, your case will stay cleaner with a positive pressure situation. At least start out with the stock fans and see how you do.
PC parts can tolerate a fair amount of heat without damage or loss of performance.

6. I know of no games that use dual monitors; I expect that you will be gaming on one and using the other as a side monitor, In that case, the side monitor adds little to the gpu load.


I'll take most of the points you raised into consideration but would also like to counter some.
I DO plan to use the h100i in exhaust mode. (note how i have 2 in takes and 3(?) exhausts). I think that would restrict the amount of stagnant air that gets" heated up ". And FYI, this is a h100I. Notice the" i" there. That means NEWER version of the original h100. I think that means they have already dealt with the leak problem.

But, I HAVE taken you advice for a single gpu seriously. So can you please suggest a good nvidia card?
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May 15, 2014 10:22:39 AM

Actually, low temps do help performance. Cuz resistivity increases if temp increases. That would hamper electric currents. That would lead to lower performance.
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