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Seeking build advice for 1000 USD

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May 19, 2014 7:17:22 PM


Hi guys,

I want to build a gaming desktop for 1000 bucks which will also be used for watching movies and videos.

Approximate Purchase Date: 6/1/2014

Budget Range: 1000 USD

System Usage from Most to Least Important: gaming, watching movies, surfing the internet

Are you buying a monitor: Yes

Do you need to buy OS: Yes

Location: City, State/Region, Country - Pittsburgh, PA

Parts Preferences: Intel i5, Nvidia 770

Overclocking: No

SLI or Crossfire: No

Your Monitor Resolution: 1200X1080

Additional Comments: Playing games like Skyrim, Diablo 3, COD Ghost, Assassin's creed

Thanks for your help!

May 19, 2014 7:39:04 PM

Do u mean that ur monitor resolution is 1920x1080??
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May 19, 2014 7:43:29 PM

If ur monitor resolution preference is 1920x1080 then heres ur build

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4570 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.96 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock B85M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Team Vulcan 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($67.47 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.43 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 770 2GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($314.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Silverstone PS08B (Black) MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($36.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($64.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: BenQ GW2450 24.0" Monitor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1028.77
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-05-19 22:41 EDT-0400)
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May 20, 2014 5:03:07 PM

charanjit1998 said:
If ur monitor resolution preference is 1920x1080 then heres ur build

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4570 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.96 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock B85M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Team Vulcan 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($67.47 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.43 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 770 2GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($314.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Silverstone PS08B (Black) MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($36.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($64.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: BenQ GW2450 24.0" Monitor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1028.77
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-05-19 22:41 EDT-0400)


Thanks charanjit1998 ! This seems to be an impressive build.
I have a couple of questions,

(I can increase my budget a little more if I can get something with better value for money.)

Monitor
I would be spending more time watching movies than playing games. And I know this particular Benq Monitor provides offers best of both worlds: 4millisec pixel response ensures good gaming and has better colors than a TN display. I was wondering if an IPS monitor would be a better option for my needs or is there any monitor which can satisfy both the requirements?
I can increase my budget a little more if I can get something with value for money.

Case
Does the Silverstone case provide good cable management and air flow?

Power Supply
The power supply seems to be a very good for the budget. Just wanted to make sure it can efficiently and safely power the components. What would be a good modular power supply that you would suggest for this build?

Uninterrupted Power Supply
In India, UPS was a must for PCs I haven't seen people using it here in US. What would you suggest a surge protector or a UPS? I just need so much time out of it to shut the computer safely in case of power failure.

Appreciate your time!
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Best solution

a c 252 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
May 22, 2014 7:00:38 AM

I (personally) like IPS, due to color reproduction and accuracy, as well as viewing angles, so I included an IPS display from LG. As long as your response time is under 7ms or so, it's good for gaming, and this LG has 5ms, which is about average for TN panels, and pretty good for IPS.

Changed you up to the Xeon chip for just a tad more money. It'll game right now just as well as an i5, but it seems like you want something that will last a long time, and with hyperthreading, the Xeon will last for a VERY long time for gaming. Also threw in a CPU cooler to keep it quiet.

Also upgraded to the H97 board. The B85 is more business oriented, and the H97 will allow for the next couple cycles of Intel CPU upgrades - if you want to - and the H97 Pro4 is a great mix of quality/price.

Added an SSD, because at this budget you certainly want to make the system as fast as you can. With Windows 8.1 and an SSD, you can cold boot almost as fast as Windows 7 can come back from sleep lol

The power supply included is a great value, and is solidly made. Has plenty of power and quality to last you a long time.

I'm glad you spelled out what UPS stands for lol I've known what they are, but as I've never used one personally (nor taken the time to research lol) I've never known that's what it stood for. To answer your question on this topic, though, most places in the US have very stable power. I can't speak for exactly where you're going to live, but I will say you won't absolutely need one. If it will make you feel better, and you can afford one, might as well get one :)  Just make sure you get one with 450w+ delivery. You won't come near that, but you want to make sure you have plenty of headroom, as the one time there will be a power surge/outage, it'll be when you're doing that one resource-intensive extremely important thing lol

Overall, the build below is built around quality and longevity. With the Xeon and 770, you'll be playing games at 1080p in High/Ultra/Max for years to come, with no worry about the parts included:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($239.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper TX3 54.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($18.16 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock H97M PRO4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($87.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: A-Data XPG V2 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($66.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Mushkin 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($65.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.43 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 770 2GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($324.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Rosewill Line-M MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Antec Neo Eco 620W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply ($41.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Monitor: LG 23MP55HQ-P 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($135.00 @ Newegg)
Total: $1195.47
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-05-22 09:53 EDT-0400)


Let me know if you have any questions on this.
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May 22, 2014 7:14:41 AM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3ONX5
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3ONX5/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3ONX5/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-4570 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.96 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: MSI CSM-B85M-E45 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($74.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Kingston HyperX 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.99 @ Micro Center)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.43 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Superclocked ACX Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($54.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Dell S2340L 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($199.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1135.28
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-05-22 10:18 EDT-0400)
Pretty much the same rig i'm using now except for the VGA and PSU. If you want you can use the 21.5 monitor from LG and change the B85 to H97
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a b 4 Gaming
May 22, 2014 8:38:39 AM

+1 to hightechobsessed seems he has the best bang for the buck build managed to squeeze a Xeon in there along with an SSD.
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May 22, 2014 12:34:49 PM

Thanks for your input guys! Sorry for the delay in replying as I was at work and still am.

@HiTechObsessed

Kudos to your patience for replying in great detail!

For i5, does it happen that for low graphics intensive activities like watching movies or web surfing the discrete GPU is switched off and iGPU is used, something like notebooks have "Optimus technology". I know that when using a discrete GPU you connect the monitor to the card's video adapter and the monitor always uses the discrete GPU. I mean isn't it a waste of powerful cards just for playing videos or web surfing.
With a discrete GPU and no CPU overclocking, wouldn't it be better to use a Xeon instead of i5 because anyways we can't use the iGPU? Just for information sake.

Also, could you suggest a good wireless lan card?
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a c 252 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
May 22, 2014 2:14:17 PM

There's no way to do that without a specific program, and I am completely blanking on what it's called... But it isn't worth the hassle. The GPU will barely sip any power when playing videos and the like. A dedicated GPU uses only slightly more power than an iGPU would when playing videos.

And the Xeon is definitely a good option, as it will perform the same in gaming as the i5 will, but the Xeon above has hyperthreading as well, so it will stay relevant longer, and give you a great performance boost in editing, rendering, etc.
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a c 252 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
May 22, 2014 2:15:06 PM

Sorry, forgot the wireless card lol

Wouldn't call it the best, but for $19, you can't beat the overall value.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

Wireless Network Adapter: TP-Link TL-WN881ND 802.11b/g/n PCI-Express x1 Wi-Fi Adapter ($18.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $18.99
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-05-22 17:14 EDT-0400)
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May 22, 2014 3:14:22 PM

Great! Though, I won't be doing any video editing and stuff but I guess if the future games utilize hyper threading Xeon would turn out to be a better investment.

One more thing, is an external cooler necessary if I don't OC the cpu? Since, I have never built a system before I am not sure if I can apply the thermal paste correctly :D  . Though it seems to be simple.

Thanks again for all your help!
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