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Question about overclocking

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May 23, 2014 8:07:04 AM

I don't want to overclock but I am curious. And I Dont know much about it but, with cpu ocing if it's just as easy as going into the bios and changing the multiplier then why can't people oc 100%? is it because of cooling or am I missing something - thanks

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a c 158 K Overclocking
May 23, 2014 8:15:43 AM

Any electronic or mechanical devise is designed to operate in a safe operating range .... You car will likely operate fine going 65 mph on a 55 mph road but the ability of you and the car to operate much higher is limited by your reaction times, sight distance, tire friction, stopping distances etc. Same thing. In shrinking the die down to a reasonable size, the individual circuits can safely operate within know voltage, amperage and temperature limits. Exceed them a bit and all will be well due to designed on safety factors.....some due to the vagaries of manufacturing will do better than others. Keep pushing and they either generate too much heat for the cooling system to handle or electrons start to jump from one circuit to another.

This will result in instabilities, thermal throttling and if pushed too far even damage.
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a b K Overclocking
May 23, 2014 8:20:59 AM

Manufacturers leave some headroom so that mass-production is easier, since silicon quality can vary even on the same wafer which CPU dies are cut.

Overclocking exploits that headroom.
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a b K Overclocking
May 23, 2014 8:22:22 AM

CaptainGunny said:
I don't want to overclock but I am curious. And I Dont know much about it but, with cpu ocing if it's just as easy as going into the bios and changing the multiplier then why can't people oc 100%? is it because of cooling or am I missing something - thanks


Power limitations, Heat, Electromigration . . . A group of processors that are the same design are generally binned together and a certain amount of them sold at each defined speed, essentially they are the same processors, just with different settings.

So yes, if you change the settings it just goes faster. The faster it goes the more power it uses and the more heat and the more likely it is to have data errors. Overclocking is essentially a game of 'how fast can it go before failing... then slow it down just a bit'.
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a b K Overclocking
May 23, 2014 8:25:15 AM

^^ all good answers.
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a b K Overclocking
May 23, 2014 8:31:56 AM

There's a designed speed that these chips are set. It is set under speed at which they(all the chips in a series) start to have issues. Every chip is physically different and so the designers come up with a speed that (even with minor imperfections) every chip will meet. Some chips may be able to be pushed to run at higher speeds than ithers. In testing, 2 chips will have different max speeds before either becoming unstable or failing. If you could overclock a chip to 100% above it's designed speed, then the designers(and engineers) have made a mistake, and didn't set the designed speed correctly.
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May 23, 2014 8:55:18 AM

Thanks guys for all the answers really helped.
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