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Cheapest mATX for SLI socket 1150

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  • SLI
  • Motherboards
  • Crossfire
Last response: in Motherboards
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May 25, 2014 10:00:02 AM

Don't mind brands, Need support for SLI (mATX) because im going to get 2nd gtx 760 (amazon preffered) and the case is fractal design core 1000 so the places of pci-e slots matters

More about : cheapest matx sli socket 1150

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a c 266 V Motherboard
May 25, 2014 10:45:46 AM

Here is one such M-ATX that should meet your criteria, the ASRock Z87M Extreme4
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

But, today any motherboard upgrade should be to a Z97 based motherboard.
That preserves your options for future cpu upgrades.
It will cost you $10 more for a GIGABYTE GA-Z97MX-Gaming
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Past that, I do not support planning for sli unless you will be gaming on triple monitors or a 4k monitor.

Here is my canned rant on planning for dual cards:
-----------------------------Start of rant----------------------------------------------------
Dual graphics cards vs. a good single card.

a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX650/ti or 7770 can give you good performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX660 or 7850 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single gtx690,7990, GTX780ti or R9-290X is about as good as it gets for a single card.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, or a 4k monitor, might sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards and stronger single card solutions.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX660 needs a 430w psu, even a GTX780 only needs a 575w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 200w to your psu requirements.

Even the most power hungry GTX690 only needs 620w, or a 7990 needs 700w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual gpu's do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual gpu support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) dual cards up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.
The high end Maxwell and amd 8000 or 9000 series are due the end of the year or next year.
-------------------------------End of rant-----------------------------------------------------------
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May 25, 2014 11:21:09 AM

geofelt said:
Here is one such M-ATX that should meet your criteria, the ASRock Z87M Extreme4
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

But, today any motherboard upgrade should be to a Z97 based motherboard.
That preserves your options for future cpu upgrades.
It will cost you $10 more for a GIGABYTE GA-Z97MX-Gaming
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Past that, I do not support planning for sli unless you will be gaming on triple monitors or a 4k monitor.

Here is my canned rant on planning for dual cards:
-----------------------------Start of rant----------------------------------------------------
Dual graphics cards vs. a good single card.

a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX650/ti or 7770 can give you good performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX660 or 7850 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single gtx690,7990, GTX780ti or R9-290X is about as good as it gets for a single card.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, or a 4k monitor, might sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards and stronger single card solutions.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX660 needs a 430w psu, even a GTX780 only needs a 575w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 200w to your psu requirements.

Even the most power hungry GTX690 only needs 620w, or a 7990 needs 700w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual gpu's do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual gpu support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) dual cards up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.
The high end Maxwell and amd 8000 or 9000 series are due the end of the year or next year.
-------------------------------End of rant-----------------------------------------------------------
Thanks. I decided to go with the gigabyte motherboard it was the one i was searching for. Btw the gtx 760 (msi twin frozr) is going to be a gift for my birthday so i don't need new card but i don't have a motherboard and this was exactly what i was searching for. The SLI is for later upgrades when i can buy 2 more monitors.

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