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Installing Windows 7 from a USB stick

Ok so I think this is a pretty common thing here on the forums, but this time, it's got a slight twist to it. So I'm building a PC, but I don't want it to have a disk drive for multiple reasons. Now I know that if you already have a windows computer, you can transfer the boot software from windows 7 to the USB stick, and from there to the new PC. The problem here is that I currently don't own a Windows computer; I have a mac. So if there's any way I could get the boot software to the USB from a mac, that would be absolutely lovely.

Thanks!
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about installing windows usb stick
  1. ... mmm i'd borrow someone else's PC, and use the windows 7 usb/dvd download tool from MS to make the bootable disk.
  2. Best answer
    Follow these steps :
    1: From the Finder, open the Applications folder, and then Utilities.

    2: Open the Boot Camp Assistant, and then click Continue. The next screen should give you a list of options.

    Note: Verify that the USB drive you will be writing to is plugged in.

    3: Uncheck the Install Windows 7 and Download the latest Windows support software from Apple options.
    4: Check Create a Windows 7 install disk and click Continue.

    5: Your USB drive should be listed in the "Destination disk" area. Use the choose button to browse to your .iso file; after selecting it, click Continue.

    If prompted, confirm your action and/or provide an administrator's password. The process of writing the .iso file to the USB drive can take twenty minutes or longer.

    Source: http://kb.iu.edu/data/bciz.html

    Note-if this does not work, alternatives: http://superuser.com/questions/421402/how-to-create-a-bootable-usb-windows-os-using-mac-os-x
    OR
    Search google for: create windows 7 bootable usb from mac.
    There are many results displayed
  3. ingtar33 said:
    ... mmm i'd borrow someone else's PC, and use the windows 7 usb/dvd download tool from MS to make the bootable disk.


    No need of doing all these.
  4. SuperAdithya said:
    Follow these steps :
    1: From the Finder, open the Applications folder, and then Utilities.

    2: Open the Boot Camp Assistant, and then click Continue. The next screen should give you a list of options.

    Note: Verify that the USB drive you will be writing to is plugged in.

    3: Uncheck the Install Windows 7 and Download the latest Windows support software from Apple options.
    4: Check Create a Windows 7 install disk and click Continue.

    5: Your USB drive should be listed in the "Destination disk" area. Use the choose button to browse to your .iso file; after selecting it, click Continue.

    If prompted, confirm your action and/or provide an administrator's password. The process of writing the .iso file to the USB drive can take twenty minutes or longer.

    Source: http://kb.iu.edu/data/bciz.html

    Note-if this does not work, alternatives: http://superuser.com/questions/421402/how-to-create-a-bootable-usb-windows-os-using-mac-os-x
    OR
    Search google for: create windows 7 bootable usb from mac.
    There are many results displayed


    i'm pretty sure this just makes an mac os bootable disk and doesn't work if you have a cd/dvd drive on the mac itself.

    but it might work. no harm in trying.
  5. ingtar33 said:
    SuperAdithya said:
    Follow these steps :
    1: From the Finder, open the Applications folder, and then Utilities.

    2: Open the Boot Camp Assistant, and then click Continue. The next screen should give you a list of options.

    Note: Verify that the USB drive you will be writing to is plugged in.

    3: Uncheck the Install Windows 7 and Download the latest Windows support software from Apple options.
    4: Check Create a Windows 7 install disk and click Continue.

    5: Your USB drive should be listed in the "Destination disk" area. Use the choose button to browse to your .iso file; after selecting it, click Continue.

    If prompted, confirm your action and/or provide an administrator's password. The process of writing the .iso file to the USB drive can take twenty minutes or longer.

    Source: http://kb.iu.edu/data/bciz.html

    Note-if this does not work, alternatives: http://superuser.com/questions/421402/how-to-create-a-bootable-usb-windows-os-using-mac-os-x
    OR
    Search google for: create windows 7 bootable usb from mac.
    There are many results displayed


    i'm pretty sure this just makes an mac os bootable disk and doesn't work if you have a cd/dvd drive on the mac itself.

    but it might work. no harm in trying.


    The fun part is that my Late 2011 Macbook Pro does have a cd drive :)
  6. Yodaskool said:
    ingtar33 said:
    SuperAdithya said:
    Follow these steps :
    1: From the Finder, open the Applications folder, and then Utilities.

    2: Open the Boot Camp Assistant, and then click Continue. The next screen should give you a list of options.

    Note: Verify that the USB drive you will be writing to is plugged in.

    3: Uncheck the Install Windows 7 and Download the latest Windows support software from Apple options.
    4: Check Create a Windows 7 install disk and click Continue.

    5: Your USB drive should be listed in the "Destination disk" area. Use the choose button to browse to your .iso file; after selecting it, click Continue.

    If prompted, confirm your action and/or provide an administrator's password. The process of writing the .iso file to the USB drive can take twenty minutes or longer.

    Source: http://kb.iu.edu/data/bciz.html

    Note-if this does not work, alternatives: http://superuser.com/questions/421402/how-to-create-a-bootable-usb-windows-os-using-mac-os-x
    OR
    Search google for: create windows 7 bootable usb from mac.
    There are many results displayed


    i'm pretty sure this just makes an mac os bootable disk and doesn't work if you have a cd/dvd drive on the mac itself.

    but it might work. no harm in trying.


    The fun part is that my Late 2011 Macbook Pro does have a cd drive :)


    did it work? I'm curious myself.
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