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Can my 300W Mini-ITX PSU run the MSI GTX 760 Gaming ITX GPU

I currently have an Intel DH57JG "Jet Geyser" Mini-ITX motherboard, an Intel Core i3-530 2.93 GHz (gutless Clarkdale piece of crap), 4GB (2x2GB) 1033 MHz DDR3 RAM, and an Nvidia EVGA Geforce GT 440. Being a TRUE Mini-ITX enclosure, it only supports Mini-ITX PSU's. It came with when I bought it the largest Mini-ITX PSU they still make (300W), as far as I know.

The problem is, I am stuck between deciding on an EVGA GTX 750 Ti or the MSI GTX 760 Gaming ITX for a new GPU. I already figured out that I'm upgrading my CPU to a Core i3-4310, and the motherboard to an ASRock Z87E-ITX.

The problem is, I don't know what the TDP is on the GTX 760 Gaming ITX, I can't find the info anywhere. I know I have enough power in the 300W PSU to run the EVGA GTX 750 Ti, but all the sites that are reviewing the GTX 760 Gaming ITX are using these monster ATX rigs with 32GB of 2133 MHz RAM, ASUS Rampage IV Black Mobo's and Intel Core i7-4960x CPU's.

That doesn't tell me anything. Does anybody who owns the card (or knows definitively about it) know if:
1. It actually takes less power than a full size GTX 760 (aka isn't just a "form factor" ITX card) If it doesn't take less power, then I instantly know that I probably can't run it OR will easily be able to find out the TDP of it.
2. The exact TDP of the card
OR 3. (most preferable to me). Will it run on my Mini-ITX 300W power supply? (no math involved on my end) The processor I'm getting is 54W TDP and the RAM is just stock Corsair 2x4GB 1600 MHz RAM.

P.S. If they make a larger Mini-ITX power supply and I'm just an idiot thinking 300W is the biggest... TELL ME. I have no problem spending money on a larger PSU to get this card to run (hopefully any bigger PSU can run it) I just can't replace the enclosure because there's no reason to, I would rather get the EVGA GTX 750 Ti than replace the enclosure.
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about 300w mini itx psu run msi gtx 760 gaming itx gpu
  1. You don't want to run a 760 on a 300W power supply. Either find a 550W psu that fits or get a GTX 750ti
  2. Suztera said:
    You don't want to run a 760 on a 300W power supply. Either find a 550W psu that fits or get a GTX 750ti


    I'm going to wait for a few more people to give their opinions before deciding, it's not that I don't trust you, it's just that I'm looking for an amalgam of different responses to choose from. Thanks for the speedy answer, though.
  3. Agreed.
    One rule-of-thumb is to see if you have the required 6/8-pin graphic power cables.

    Also, no offense but you should keep your questions as SHORT as possible. Be specific, we don't need the history. I can't bring myself to read through all that.
  4. photonboy said:
    Agreed.
    One rule-of-thumb is to see if you have the required 6/8-pin graphic power cables.

    Also, no offense but you should keep your questions as SHORT as possible. Be specific, we don't need the history. I can't bring myself to read through all that.


    Hahaha will do. Yeah, the motherboard I'm upgrading to has all the right PCIE power connectors for both the EVGA GTX 750 Ti and MSI GTX 760 Gaming ITX. The problem I'm having is if the +12V rail on my PSU can support a card as reportedly demanding as the GTX 760 supposedly is. I will actually post another comment with the exact specifics of the PSU because I realize now how vague 300W is.
  5. Best answer
    There's a few issues here.

    1. The GTX760 has a stated TDP of 170W. The version is fairly irrelevant, though obviously the overclocked versions are likely to pull more power than ones running at stock speeds.

    2. The "ITX" GTX760 is just a standard GTX760 with a shorter than average cooler than a single 8pin power cable rather than two 6pins (in theory that's the same power but in one cable rather than two).

    3. In theory, you can run a GTX760 on that PSU, especially if you are keeping the clock speeds low, but is it a good idea? Almost undoubtledly not.
    A) You don't provide any info about your PSU, just that it is "300W".
    B) Your PSU is 4 years old
    C) You are replacing most of your build anyway (the expensive bits) so why not start from scratch?


    Couple of random thoughts -
    ASRock Z87E-ITX with a 4130 seems an odd pairing (expensive board/chipset with cheapish processor).
    The "missing" graphics card in your consideration is the GTX660. It sits between the 750Ti and GTX760 in both power usage and performance, and can be found in remarkably compact versions.
  6. GPUEnthusiast said:
    photonboy said:
    Agreed.
    One rule-of-thumb is to see if you have the required 6/8-pin graphic power cables.

    Also, no offense but you should keep your questions as SHORT as possible. Be specific, we don't need the history. I can't bring myself to read through all that.


    Hahaha will do. Yeah, the motherboard I'm upgrading to has all the right PCIE power connectors for both the EVGA GTX 750 Ti and MSI GTX 760 Gaming ITX. The problem I'm having is if the +12V rail on my PSU can support a card as reportedly demanding as the GTX 760 supposedly is. I will actually post another comment with the exact specifics of the PSU because I realize now how vague 300W is.


    Um...
    I don't think you understood my post. I said the Power Supply must have the proper power connectors for the graphics card. For example, a GTX760 might require 2x6-pin PCIe power cables. If the power supply doesn't have those it can't power the card.

    If the power supply DOES have the proper power cables for the card then it should have the proper power distribution. You won't find a 300W with 2x6-pin.

    The MOTHERBOARD doesn't factor into this part of it.
  7. You are correct, I did not understand your question. I thought you were asking if I had the correct PCI E version (x16 3.0) in this case. It appears I do not have the correct power connectors on my PSU. I have been really busy so I have neglected to post my exact PSU details. I have already given up on this thread because not only does the PSU not have the correct power connectors, but it also is too wide of a card.
  8. Yes, the PSU is going on four years old. While the PSU does actually have an 8 pin power connector I don't feel comfortable using it because the power supply is already quite old and can't stand the chance of having a short and bricking a card that expensive. Apart from not having a suitable wattage. I was chasing a pipe-dream really. I already have a screaming gaming rig, I don't need a second one in my living room. I will be upgrading my GPU still, as well as the motherboard, CPU, and RAM. The GPU upgrade really is for the ability to display 4k content, but it will also be much better at gaming, but still basically a Gameboy versus my Full-ATX PC.

    As for your question about sticking with a Core i3. I like the dual core. Because of my job, I do a lot of tasks that require incredibly high single core performance and it doesn't warrant getting a really high end quad core with comparable single core performance. Also, as I was chasing this Mini-ITX pipe dream, I was trying to save as much power as I could, going with a Z87 chipset, Haswell i3, that used 22nm mfg and has a 54W TDP versus my Core i3-530 which is a H55 Express chipset, ancient Clarkdale technology, and a 32nm mfg and has 73W TDP.

    My final build when all is said and done is this:
    Nvidia Geforce EVGA GT 640 4GB Single Slot Edition (uses 20 amps on the +12 Rail just like my GT 440, but significantly more power)
    ASRock Z87E-ITX
    Intel Core i3-4350
    8GB (2x4GB) 1600 MHz Corsair RAM
  9. Still don't really get your build to be honest.
    What I was getting at with the i3 wasn't that it wasn't very good, but that Z87 is the top motherboard chipset and it's unlikely you need any of the features it provides. Depending on your needs, a H81/B85 or H87 board might be more appropriate, and cheaper.
    Similarly, I'm not really sure why a 4Gb low end card exists, I don't know of any scenario which warrants that much memory without it being paired to something significant. Something like a HD7750 comes (came, it's EOL) in low profile and single slot versions, and doesn't require a power connector so it's usually a safe bet if you need a low end graphics card to squeeze into a build.
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