Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Create separate networks, by cascading routers, without changing default router settings

Last response: in Networking
Share
May 30, 2014 12:39:00 PM

I am trying to create two completely separate and independent networks in my home (no communication between the networks). After extensive research and help on this forum, I determined that the best way to do this is with two routers. Connect the first router to the modem and the second router to the first via a LAN-LAN connection, after first turning off the DHCP of the second router and setting the IP of the second router to something outside the DHCP range of the first router.

Unfortunately, after several days of effort, my skills are not up to the task (once I turn off the DHCP and set the IP of the second router, I cannot connect back up to it). As a result, I have decided to purchase two routers with different IP addresses and different DHCP ranges to hopefully avoid any need to change the default router settings. Specifically I plan to purchase a Netgear router (IP: 192.168.1.x) and a Mac AirPort router (IP: 10.0.1.x).

My question is, can I now connect the two routers, without changing the default router configurations (i.e. idiot proof the process)?
Also, should I use a LAN-WAN connection or a LAN-LAN connection?

Thanks

Best solution

May 30, 2014 1:05:57 PM

The information you used is for people wanting to use a second wireless router on the same network, not for separate networks. For separate networks with the kind of hardware you are using, you would hook the first router to your modem and then hook the second router to the first using a LAN connection on the first to the WAN connection on the second. You would leave DHCP on for both routers. Now this does create 2 networks and people on the first network cannot see people on the second network. But it may be possible for people on the second network to see people on the first network as you are using the first network to connect to the second. To get them totally separate you would need a little more sophisticated router.
Share
May 30, 2014 2:53:28 PM

Thank you so much for your quick response.

For a "more sophisticated routed," I assume you are referring to a commercial grade router? The routers, I am looking at are consumer grade, but the top of the line of what Netgear and Apple offers if that helps any.

Also, one of my goals is security of the second router. Is there anything I should be aware of when cascading the two routers to help that effort.
Thanks again
m
0
l
Related resources
May 30, 2014 3:07:14 PM

abailey said:
The information you used is for people wanting to use a second wireless router on the same network, not for separate networks. For separate networks with the kind of hardware you are using, you would hook the first router to your modem and then hook the second router to the first using a LAN connection on the first to the WAN connection on the second. You would leave DHCP on for both routers. Now this does create 2 networks and people on the first network cannot see people on the second network. But it may be possible for people on the second network to see people on the first network as you are using the first network to connect to the second. To get them totally separate you would need a little more sophisticated router.


Thank you so much for your quick response.

For a "more sophisticated routed," I assume you are referring to a commercial grade router? The routers, I am looking at are consumer grade, but the top of the line of what Netgear and Apple offers if that helps any.

Also, one of my goals is security of the second router. Is there anything I should be aware of when cascading the two routers to help that effort.
Thanks again
m
0
l
May 30, 2014 5:55:06 PM

You can do it with a consumer router but it must have the ability to block certain packets...many times called firewall but has lots of names. On the second router you would put a rule in that users in the second network could not talk to any ip in the first network subnet.

The big downside of cascading 2 routers is if you need to do any kind of port mapping or UPnP. With 2 nat devices it can get tricky. It should work fine for most normal websurfing and stuff.
m
0
l
!