PC instantly crashes when loading games and restarts, don't know how to further go :c

Hi guys,

So, i've had some problems already with my pc and all the past ones I managed to get fixed (also with the help of forums in here :D). But i'm just stuck with this one and I would appreciate a lot if you guys would manage to help me out of this one.

Specs:
EVGA Geforce GTX 660Ti
Intel Core i7 3770k
12 gb ram
Corsair 800W
Asus P8Z77-V

So, I just bought Watch Dogs and i'm crazy to play it, but it doesn't get past that Ubisoft intro and my pc restarts out of nowhere. This happens with many other games too, like BF4, LoL, etc.

What I have already tried is: running BIOS with optimized settings, but when I do that, the gpu goes with 4000 something MHz and it just starts crashing even earlier and also outside games, but with BSOD. I decided to turn Turbo Mode off, so it turns into only 3600 Mhz and the PC gets stable, until I start gaming. I've also tried to underclock it and the PC crashes instantly.
Oh, when I turned off Turbo Mode in order to get only 3600 Mhz on the clock speed of the CPU, it would go sometimes off and then give me that Asus Anti-Surge Trigger. It was annoying enough for me to disable it, and as I said, it now only instantly crashes and restarts after starting a game.

I don't know at all if the defect is on a configuration, on the GPU, CPU or PSU, i'm totally desperate ;-;.

Once again, thanks if any of you manages to help me out!
38 answers Last reply
More about instantly crashes loading games restarts
  1. If you get Anti-Surge messages, it means your PSU's outputs most likely went far enough out of spec to trip the motherboard's over-voltage protections.

    Basically, your motherboard is telling you it is receiving bad power. (Or at least that its protection circuitry does not like the power it is seeing.)

    The way most such protections operate when they trip is by shorting power rails to ground, which clamps the voltage surges and forces the PSU to shut down from overload.
  2. InvalidError said:
    If you get Anti-Surge messages, it means your PSU's outputs most likely went far enough out of spec to trip the motherboard's over-voltage protections.

    Basically, your motherboard is telling you it is receiving bad power. (Or at least that its protection circuitry does not like the power it is seeing.)

    The way most such protections operate when they trip is by shorting power rails to ground, which clamps the voltage surges and forces the PSU to shut down from overload.


    Oooh, I didn't knew that. Do you have any suggestions of what I could do to solve it?
  3. Try running the motherboard with its BIOS settings all set at their default settings (i.e. no overclocking). If your system runs stable at default BIOS settings then you can gradually begin to apply some overclocking.
  4. ko888 said:
    Try running the motherboard with its BIOS settings all set at their default settings (i.e. no overclocking). If your system runs stable at default BIOS settings then you can gradually begin to apply some overclocking.


    The thing is, when I do this, my CPU goes on what seems to be a quite big clock speed (4315 Mhz) and the pc doesn't even stays stable, it just goes BSOD. I then turnet the Turbo Mode, etc. off to make it at least run normally when i'm not gaming and with the Power surge detection off (which I don't know if I should actually have turned off) :c
  5. Go into bios and load fail safe defaults. Also, what is your BIOS CPU temperature?
  6. Johannes Kuckertz said:
    (...) and with the Power surge detection off (which I don't know if I should actually have turned off) :c

    If you had anti-surge trip warnings, turned anti-surge off and still get reboots whenever you do something CPU/GPU-intensive, it likely means the PSU is putting out enough noise to cause downstream regulators to malfunction and in turn cause their loads to malfunction. In many cases, those downstream chips will cause a hard-reset when they detect that they ended up in an impossible or otherwise unrecoverable state.

    At any rate, anti-surge does indicate that the PSU needs to be investigated - if outputs are clean and within spec, you should not be getting those messages - output voltages usually need to be out by 10-20% to trip protections while the ATX spec allows only a 5% deviation from nominal. Unless the protection thresholds are awfully tight, the protections tripping should indicate that the PSU was 2-4X out of tolerance at the time the protections got triggered for some reason.

    If the PSU is a few years old, one of the most common reasons is under-rated or low-quality output caps starting to fail. If the PSU is only a few weeks/months old, it could be that some of the capacitors suffered mechanical damage during manufacturing, shipping, assembly, etc. such as a broken lead - possibly internally.

    The only way to know for certain would be to plug in an oscilloscope and look at exactly what happens during the microseconds just before the computer reboots.
  7. Just a small update, i'm still having the problem but I've seen that my 12V rail is running with ~11,5V sometimes higher and sometimes lower. Is that significant enough to cause these (annoying) restarts in my system ? I've seen this in BIOS and many people just say that you shouldn't trust that info.
    It was also suggested that I should update my BIOS. Would that maybe solve this ?
  8. The system management chip that monitors voltages is not a precision measurement instrument; it merely gives you a general idea of what might be going on there. 11.5V would be somewhat on the low side but still within the 5% tolerance allowed by the ATX standard.

    Voltages in BIOS do not mean much (unless they far enough out of spec to exceed the ATX tolerances and tolerances on the monitoring chip itself) since rails may go up/down depending on loads on other rails (this is called cross-loading) so if you want to have a better idea of exactly what is happening, you have to look at it live while setting up the scenario you want to examine.

    Updating the BIOS is unlikely to make any difference.

    BTW, anti-surge is usually meant to protect against excessive voltage so in principle, you should have at least one rail rising too far above spec when it trips.
  9. InvalidError said:
    The system management chip that monitors voltages is not a precision measurement instrument; it merely gives you a general idea of what might be going on there. 11.5V would be somewhat on the low side but still within the 5% tolerance allowed by the ATX standard.

    Voltages in BIOS do not mean much (unless they far enough out of spec to exceed the ATX tolerances and tolerances on the monitoring chip itself) since rails may go up/down depending on loads on other rails (this is called cross-loading) so if you want to have a better idea of exactly what is happening, you have to look at it live while setting up the scenario you want to examine.

    Updating the BIOS is unlikely to make any difference.

    BTW, anti-surge is usually meant to protect against excessive voltage so in principle, you should have at least one rail rising too far above spec when it trips.


    I see. I will check the other rails, I admit having ignored them. Want to give this problem and end so baaaad :P
  10. Checked it, everything related to the rails is actually fine. Just "playing around" in the BIOS, I turned X.M.P on, my memory frequency went up do 1600, and I left it so to check if maybe that would do something. Well, it did something good. I manage to run Watchdogs for a small while now (better than crashing before it even ended loading xD), but after a time, my pc screen goes off, I don't know which fan, but one goes very crazy fast and it restarts as usual. So, I don't know if it is progress, but does anyone of you guys have an idea what this means?

    I also ran some benchmark tests and it went pretty well, no crashes at all :3
  11. If you have fans "going crazy fast" then either your GPU is not getting enough airflow to dump its heat into or your CPU's HSF is not making good enough contact with the CPU so the motherboard cranks the fan to maximum in an attempt to make it cooler.
  12. InvalidError said:
    If you have fans "going crazy fast" then either your GPU is not getting enough airflow to dump its heat into or your CPU's HSF is not making good enough contact with the CPU so the motherboard cranks the fan to maximum in an attempt to make it cooler.


    Hmm, do you think applying a new layer of thermal paste would have, possibly, good effects ?

    Btw, thanks a lot for all the help you're giving!! :]
  13. Hi there!
    It could be a temperature issue as others have pointed out especially on those high freqs.
    Watch Dogs for some reason is very CPU intensive and the stock intel cooler just can't handle it (just bought a new cooler for the very same reason)
    Also be sure that your computer's inside is dust-free... clean it out with an air compressor or something..

    You could try testing with prime95 (first option of stress test) only stressing the cpu to see if it actually crashes from overheating

    Cheers
  14. zenx said:
    Hi there!
    It could be a temperature issue as others have pointed out especially on those high freqs.
    Watch Dogs for some reason is very CPU intensive and the stock intel cooler just can't handle it (just bought a new cooler for the very same reason)
    Also be sure that your computer's inside is dust-free... clean it out with an air compressor or something..

    You could try testing with prime95 (first option of stress test) only stressing the cpu to see if it actually crashes from overheating

    Cheers


    I stress tested the CPU with prime95 and it did pretty fine. My CPU is watercooled though. But I will reapply the thermal paste just to make sure that isn't what is causing my pc to crash.

    I did ran HWMonitor in the background and the CPU temps were not extreeemely high. But my GPU temps go to 75ºC (Nvidia GTX 660Ti). Is that a very high temperature for this GPU ?
  15. The fan that is going crazy is my Watercooler fan from my Corsair H80. My temps with Prime95 on the CPU are around 65ºC. I'm so confused :( Fans don't go crazy with prime95 though, only when gaming.
  16. If you are looking at core temperatures, 65C should be no big deal. If the fan kicks into high gear only while gaming, you might have something modifying your fan speed profile.
  17. Johannes Kuckertz said:
    The fan that is going crazy is my Watercooler fan from my Corsair H80. My temps with Prime95 on the CPU are around 65ºC. I'm so confused :( Fans don't go crazy with prime95 though, only when gaming.


    Those CPU temps are normal however the GPU temp depends.. if you were reading those temperatures while any 3d app or graphic intensive program such as games were running then those are normal as well.. but for idle gpu temp it it is high - for example (I have watch dogs running in the bg and tabbed out my gpu temp is at 45 C)
  18. You can try removing the side panel from your rig, maybe airflow is blocked to the GPU or maybe the GPU heatsink is filled with dust - also check your GPU fans if they are running and try to see if games load like that and what temperatures does the GPU reach while playing.
    Ideally you would want the GPU below 80 C (they tend to get hotter than CPU-s and that's normal) and above 90 is where things start to get messed up...
    If your temps stay in safe ranges then it could also be a software issue - will check back later to see what you discovered! Cheers!
  19. zenx said:
    Johannes Kuckertz said:
    The fan that is going crazy is my Watercooler fan from my Corsair H80. My temps with Prime95 on the CPU are around 65ºC. I'm so confused :( Fans don't go crazy with prime95 though, only when gaming.


    Those CPU temps are normal however the GPU temp depends.. if you were reading those temperatures while any 3d app or graphic intensive program such as games were running then those are normal as well.. but for idle gpu temp it it is high - for example (I have watch dogs running in the bg and tabbed out my gpu temp is at 45 C)


    Yea, when i'm outside a game my cpu is running at ~37ºC and GPU at 33ºC. When I load a game, CPU goes to around 60ºC and GPU 75ºC.
    I applied the water cooling system again (removed some of the dirt on the heat sink) and reapplied new thermal paste on my CPU. And the temps keep pretty much the same as last time. I did managed to game a bit longer this time, but my watercooling fans started going crazy after this longer period of time.

    :S
  20. Ooookay :)

    I looked into some info on your motherboard. Apparently it has a bunch of auto-overclocking features in the bios as well in windows.
    So let's get rid of the windows one first since that's most likely causing the problems in case you have it :)
    If by any chance you have something called "AI Suite" installed on your system, you should try uninstalling it since from what I've read that actually tries to overclock everything on the fly based on system load.. and it has a nice habit of adjusting a bunch of voltages which would also explain the anti-surge events... and also as InvalidError pointed out modifying your fan speed (well... indirectly.. by cranking your cpu prolly somewhere above 5 ghz :))) )
    In case you don't have it installed then it's back to the bios and you should disable most of the auto overclocking you can find there (leave the XMP profile for your memory as those are actually meant to be used since the're compatible in the first place)

    Cheers! and keep us posted!
  21. zenx said:
    Ooookay :)

    I looked into some info on your motherboard. Apparently it has a bunch of auto-overclocking features in the bios as well in windows.
    So let's get rid of the windows one first since that's most likely causing the problems in case you have it :)
    If by any chance you have something called "AI Suite" installed on your system, you should try uninstalling it since from what I've read that actually tries to overclock everything on the fly based on system load.. and it has a nice habit of adjusting a bunch of voltages which would also explain the anti-surge events... and also as InvalidError pointed out modifying your fan speed (well... indirectly.. by cranking your cpu prolly somewhere above 5 ghz :))) )
    In case you don't have it installed then it's back to the bios and you should disable most of the auto overclocking you can find there (leave the XMP profile for your memory as those are actually meant to be used since the're compatible in the first place)

    Cheers! and keep us posted!


    Yes I do have Asus AI suite installed, will get rid of it right now xD

    Once again, thank you and InvalidError for all the help you guys are giving me :)
  22. Oooooh, seems to have made some good stuff. I manage to play for quite longer now (the fan still seems to like to go crazy , lol xD). Now my screen goes black sometimes, but without restarting. It goes black, then comes back and a small dialog box appears "Nvidia Driver has stopped working" and something with Kernel.

    Edit: Now it actually started to crash when running Furmark and also before some games even really start. Damn;-;
  23. Johannes Kuckertz said:
    Now my screen goes black sometimes, but without restarting. It goes black, then comes back and a small dialog box appears "Nvidia Driver has stopped working" and something with Kernel.

    You have basically three possible causes for this:
    1- corrupted OS/drivers putting the GPU in an invalid state it cannot recover from
    2- defective GPU ending up in an invalid state the drivers cannot recover from
    3- bad power corrupting the GPU

    The "easiest" way would be to plug an oscilloscope with limit-testing triggers on the rail, use the system until it shutdowns or reboots and see what happened on the scope.

    Without that, your next "best" choice is to start parts-swapping if you have spare systems with known-good parts to swap parts with. If problems follow a given part between systems, you know that part has something to do with it.
  24. InvalidError and Zenx, thanks so much!! Deleting the Asus AI Suite and also increasing the fan speed% did it for me. You have no idea how much i'd like to come over to you guys and kiss you xDD :D :D :D
  25. You're welcome :)
    Also as InvalidError pointed out, usually the black screen / driver crashing is the result of incorrect voltages to the GPU, you can basically recreate the same thing by overclocking your GPU and not increasing voltages accordingly... so I would assume (since I hope for the best) that your GPU is somewhat overclocked as well (maybe check for msi afterburner / nvidia system tools and the settings they're using)

    Cheers!
  26. Dang it, managed to play perfectly yesterday. But today, later the day it started happening again (even though, rarely). xD
  27. I assume it's the same problem again. You're GPU is somehow overclocked / not getting enough voltage for the frequencies it's running at and when you get to some more intensive parts in your game it simply crashes your video driver. As I've mentioned before check if you have MSI Afterburner / Nvidia system tools installed and the settings they have. Otherwise your bios might have some GPU overclocking functionalities as well.
    Cheers!
  28. zenx said:
    I assume it's the same problem again. You're GPU is somehow overclocked / not getting enough voltage for the frequencies it's running at and when you get to some more intensive parts in your game it simply crashes your video driver. As I've mentioned before check if you have MSI Afterburner / Nvidia system tools installed and the settings they have. Otherwise your bios might have some GPU overclocking functionalities as well.
    Cheers!


    Will do! :D

    Edit: So, I have MSI Afterburner (I was increasing the fan speed to 60% when I was about to start gaming and it sort of helped, I guess) and this is what appears:

    Core Voltage (mV): +0
    Power Limit (%): 100
    Core Clock (Mhz): +0
    Memory Clock(Mhz): +0
    Fan Speed (%): 60% (But with AUTO enabled it is 30%, I've made the change)

    Edit 2: Not even FurMark is running anymore without this f****** reboot, guess something is wrong with the GPU? Perhaps something with drivers or so?
  29. You should keep auto enabled as if you set it to 60% by default it will not go over that even if it's overheating so just leave the fan speed at auto...
    Also check for nvidia system tools.. (a "Performance" section within the nvidia control panel if it has that then it's installed otherwise no) or other overclocking software.. The symptoms still show that your GPU is simply not getting enough voltage for the clock speed it's running at... so this is the direction to go... check for overclocking software, disable them / set to default values... check bios for options regarding GPU overclocking and voltages supplied (maybe any form of auto voltage adjusting to the GPU).. if nothing works you can also try plugging in a different power cable to your gpu etc...
    Between each step test with furmark as that will generally instantly reveal the problem if it stabilizes furmark enough that it won't crash then try (win+tabbing / aero) the furmark window.. etc.. and if it's fully stable then test with games.
    If all else fails (and I really mean if all of the above failed) then you can try increasing the GPU voltage in Afterburner and testing like that to see if it stabilizes. (you need to enable the slider in the options and also check the box to load the settings on startup)

    Cheers
  30. Everything with the GPU seems to be just fine and no reason to crash D: But I've seen that malwares may start processes/services that consume a big part of your processing and that that could cause those random restarts. Is this really possible?
  31. No, not really. Malwares may cause random restarts and system instability but it would be unrelated to processing power. Your computer should run stable at full 100% load for extended periods of time (eg. that's why people do full load stress tests as long as 12 hours sometimes)
    You could double-check the clock speeds with GPU-Z (according to evga site your GPU's base clock speed is 915 Mhz while boost is 980 Mhz)
    Other than that it could be as simple as a driver issue, be sure to have the latest nvidia drivers (337.88) and maybe do a clean reinstall of the driver.
    Let me know what you find :)
  32. Oh.. and forgot to mention.. since you do have an evga card you should also check for a software called evga precision which basically has the same functionalities as afterburner, maybe there are some speed increases in that one. :D
  33. zenx said:
    Oh.. and forgot to mention.. since you do have an evga card you should also check for a software called evga precision which basically has the same functionalities as afterburner, maybe there are some speed increases in that one. :D


    Yea, I have it too. But just like the MSI Afterburner, nothing seems OC'ed. I also checked my settings in the Performance section in the Nvidia Control Panel and "factory shipped frequencies" is checked. In GPU-Z my default clock is shown as 980Mhz and Boost 1059Mhz and the GPU Clock is as 980Mhz and the boost at 1069Mhz too. Does that means it is OC'ed? If yes, do I underclock it normally in the EVGA Precision/Afterburner and how? As you can see, I'm a huge noob when it comes to overclocking :D Thanks for the help, once again :P

    Edit 1: Erm, I might have just seen that the EVGA GTX660Ti SC is the one with the Clocks I am running. I'm starting to think that I bought the Superclocked and I just discovered that now OR that something is just wrong and I should underclock it. I'm feeling dumb. But none of the drivers, Control Panel, Afterburner or any of those says that it is the SC.

    Edit 2: Here is an image how it is displayed for me in GPU-Z: http://gpuz.techpowerup.com/14/06/21/crb.png
  34. Yup, clock speeds seem to be in check, even if it's the standard version it 'should' support your current clock speeds without the need of any voltage increase. You can try to underclock it a bit with afterburner (I advise you remove all other gpu overclocking software from your pc so they don't interfere with one another) set it to the speeds I mentioned above and do a furmark burn test, see what happens. (If underclocking to these speeds won't solve the problem then it is most likely not an overclocking issue and we can check for other stuff..)
    Oh by the way did you try a different power cable on the gpu?
  35. zenx said:
    Yup, clock speeds seem to be in check, even if it's the standard version it 'should' support your current clock speeds without the need of any voltage increase. You can try to underclock it a bit with afterburner (I advise you remove all other gpu overclocking software from your pc so they don't interfere with one another) set it to the speeds I mentioned above and do a furmark burn test, see what happens. (If underclocking to these speeds won't solve the problem then it is most likely not an overclocking issue and we can check for other stuff..)
    Oh by the way did you try a different power cable on the gpu?


    I did it and Furmark crashes instantly xD
    Well, doesn't seems to be an overclocking issue then. :(
    I did tried another pair of cables on the GPU, same problems tho
  36. Btw you also didn't say which driver you are using, are you using the most recent 337.88 nvidia drivers? Have you tried reinstalling it and selecting the 'clean install' checkbox? Also your windows version? (I assumed win7 64 bit) Check your event viewer (type event viewer in start menu search) and windows logs -> application. Right after your gfx driver crash occurs you should see an error message for the nvidia driver.
  37. If you still get random shutdowns/restarts and anti-surge messages when you enable it, you still most likely have a power delivery/stability issue and no amount of messing with software, drivers, over/under-clocking, voltage tweaks, etc. will fix that. At best, it may reduce the severity and frequency of related issues.
  38. Nah @InvalidError, those were solved already and were caused by the older buggy version of AI suite superclocking his CPU on the fly... from what I gathered now he only has GPU driver crashes and no anti-surge messages and no shutdowns which would indicate his GPU isn't getting proper voltage for the current clock speeds BUT could also be caused by a bunch of other stuff including faulty hardware / driver problems / software conflicts etc..
    I assume he will have a TDR error message in his event log and would suggest him either to try different drivers (maybe do a clean OS install without any of the messy software that tends to modify clock speeds) or try increasing tdr timeout in the registry... (which I don't like as a solution but it could help...) - if you have any other ideas regarding this, let us know cuz I'm starting to run out :))
    Cheers!

    Edit: @Johannes: Despite all of this your PSU could still be the cause of this as InvalidError pointed out in the first place so if you have access to another PSU (maybe borrow from a friend) you could do some tests with that.. but don't go out spending money on a new one just yet
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