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why still using Msata instead of M.2?

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June 2, 2014 1:03:45 PM

mSATA max speed is 6Gb/s and M.2 max speed is 24Gb/s
meaning 600MB/s vs 2400MB/s.
so why my <removed by moderator> laptop manufacturer which I bought 1 month ago are using mSATA instead of M.2?
(Asus s550 cb i7)

More about : msata

June 2, 2014 1:25:39 PM

If your laptop has an HDD in it, then mSATA (the apparent equivalent of SATA III) quite possibly has a faster data transfer rate than the drive can safely manage.

And even if the drive is physically capable of faster transfer speeds, you're not going to need it. It's still much, much faster than your Internet connection speed, so any file downloading you do is going to be throttled by your Internet connection well before your drive speed throttles it. Not to mention that most home networks, even over Ethernet, are limited to 1Gbps speeds... so even transferring files over a network will be throttled by the network capacity well before the drive's bus speed limitation.

And even if you were simply transferring data drive-to-drive, at 6 Gbps you can still transfer an entire 3TB drive in under 10 minutes. Considering that it wasn't that many years ago that people had to contend with wait times of hours to transfer/back up data measuring under 1 gigabyte, I'd say you should be grateful for how fast the data is transferring.
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a b D Laptop
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June 2, 2014 6:39:24 PM

Why is it you think m.2 has a max bandwidth of 24Gb/s when it uses pcie lanes?
Sorry but you've been fed some mis-information.
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June 3, 2014 1:56:44 AM

Put simply M.2 is a much newer protocol and as such it costs more for manufacturers to make use of them. You don't only need to add M.2 to the motherboard, you need M.2 components to connect to it. It means using a completely new family of components in a device that in no way needs them. I can't find the spec for M.2 immediately, but I strongly doubt that it's just magically 4x times faster either. As Popatim said it's still a PCIe technology so it seems unlikely to be that much faster anyway.

But even if it was, then it would still cost more, and would still give poor value to the consumer. There's a reason why it's not yet a common technology. The read and write speeds even on SSDs are way behind the max speeds of SATAIII, so just having a wider interface doesn't achieve anything. You would be extremely hard pushed to feel the difference between 24 and 6 Gb/s with todays components.
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June 4, 2014 10:05:54 AM

LostAlone said:
Put simply M.2 is a much newer protocol and as such it costs more for manufacturers to make use of them. You don't only need to add M.2 to the motherboard, you need M.2 components to connect to it. It means using a completely new family of components in a device that in no way needs them. I can't find the spec for M.2 immediately, but I strongly doubt that it's just magically 4x times faster either. As Popatim said it's still a PCIe technology so it seems unlikely to be that much faster anyway.

But even if it was, then it would still cost more, and would still give poor value to the consumer. There's a reason why it's not yet a common technology. The read and write speeds even on SSDs are way behind the max speeds of SATAIII, so just having a wider interface doesn't achieve anything. You would be extremely hard pushed to feel the difference between 24 and 6 Gb/s with todays components.


Well manufacturer's duty is to use new components,
like ddr3; would you accept a super laptop with ddr2 ram today?
They should use newer technology than msata even if it has a little more bandwidth
now we don't have msata ssds that can use max speed of sata3 but maybe I want to buy a ssd one year later.:pfff: 
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June 4, 2014 11:20:31 AM

Nope, a manufacturer's duty is the same as any other company: make enough money to a) satisfy the shareholders & appease the board of directors, b) pay their employees so that they don't jump ship for somebody else, and c) at least break even, if not make a little profit, so that they can pay their bills.

If the protocol is too new, then they won't just switch 100% to it because the market won't support it. Kind of like how, when PCI started replacing the ISA standard, you didn't see ISA slots disappear from motherboards; instead, you had some motherboards (on the low-end) that were still ISA-only designs, & other boards that mixed both ISA & PCI slots (the more PCI slots, the more "high-end", & therefore more expensive, they were). But as long as manufacturers were still churning out ISA-based GPUs, sound cards, & other expansion boards, motherboard manufactuerers kept including them...until, once they stopped making ISA items, the boards stopped including ISA slots. Same thing happened with AGP: when AGP cards first came out, not every board had an AGP slot, & even when PCIe came along you still had boards that included AGP slots for a while...until they stopped making AGP cards. And even nowadays, you can still find a few boards that, in the midst of their PCIe slots, will include 1 (or even 2) PCI slots, for expansion boards that don't need the speed of a PCIe bus (i.e. older sound cards). But you can tell that PCI items are well on their way out, because the majority of the boards no longer carry them.

Again, though...for what you are going to use your laptop for, you will not see any kind of performance hit because the laptop is "only" using mSATA instead of m2. Most hardware out there won't even tax PCIe 3.0 bus speeds, anyway. So relax: you're still on the 'cutting edge" of technology.
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June 4, 2014 9:31:14 PM

spdragoo said:
Nope, a manufacturer's duty is the same as any other company: make enough money to a) satisfy the shareholders & appease the board of directors, b) pay their employees so that they don't jump ship for somebody else, and c) at least break even, if not make a little profit, so that they can pay their bills.

If the protocol is too new, then they won't just switch 100% to it because the market won't support it. Kind of like how, when PCI started replacing the ISA standard, you didn't see ISA slots disappear from motherboards; instead, you had some motherboards (on the low-end) that were still ISA-only designs, & other boards that mixed both ISA & PCI slots (the more PCI slots, the more "high-end", & therefore more expensive, they were). But as long as manufacturers were still churning out ISA-based GPUs, sound cards, & other expansion boards, motherboard manufactuerers kept including them...until, once they stopped making ISA items, the boards stopped including ISA slots. Same thing happened with AGP: when AGP cards first came out, not every board had an AGP slot, & even when PCIe came along you still had boards that included AGP slots for a while...until they stopped making AGP cards. And even nowadays, you can still find a few boards that, in the midst of their PCIe slots, will include 1 (or even 2) PCI slots, for expansion boards that don't need the speed of a PCIe bus (i.e. older sound cards). But you can tell that PCI items are well on their way out, because the majority of the boards no longer carry them.

Again, though...for what you are going to use your laptop for, you will not see any kind of performance hit because the laptop is "only" using mSATA instead of m2. Most hardware out there won't even tax PCIe 3.0 bus speeds, anyway. So relax: you're still on the 'cutting edge" of technology.

Well you are right & thanks for your complete answer
Aren't you Financial Officer of ASUS?:) 
And about I am on "cutting edge" of technology, You are WRONG:
http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-XP941-512GB-PCIe-MZHPU512...
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June 9, 2014 10:57:46 AM

and the technology is not too new, you can see m.2 slot on mac books.
but asus is not using M.2 even in newer ultrabooks! (asus s551)
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