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Windows 8.1 System Image Backup is selecting two drives as System

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June 3, 2014 6:52:41 AM

Hi,
Whilst trying to use the system image backup utility in Windows 8.1 i found it was selecting both my C: Drive and D: drive as system and not letting me unselect the D: Drive.
This is very annoying for me as I do not want the D: Drive backed up as System as it is a 1TB data drive.

Screenshots:
System Image Backup
Disk Management

More Info
C: drive has everything I could think of as system however some user files such as Pictures, Documents and Videos location has been changed to the D: Drive. However I think even before I did that it was labeled as System.

Thanks in Advance
-Zombi_Fear

More about : windows system image backup selecting drives system

a c 82 G Storage
June 3, 2014 5:26:19 PM

There's nothing wrong; both partitions are active (bootable) as can be seen in Disk Management. That doesn't cause issues.
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June 4, 2014 4:56:33 AM

GhislainG said:
There's nothing wrong; both partitions are active (bootable) as can be seen in Disk Management. That doesn't cause issues.


This is a problem as Windows System Image backup is forcing me to backup both drives which i do not want to do as the second hard rdive has 600GB of files on it
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a c 82 G Storage
June 4, 2014 6:20:16 AM

It's forcing you to backup Disk1 (which seems to be the E: drive, not the D: drive as mentioned in your original post) because there are Windows files or applications on it. Was it connected to the system when you installed the OS on Disk 0 (C: drive)? Does the system work properly if you disconnect Disk 1? You could set the partition to inactive, but don't do it until you confirmed the system doesn't need it to boot.
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June 4, 2014 6:32:47 AM

GhislainG said:
It's forcing you to backup Disk1 (which seems to be the E: drive, not the D: drive as mentioned in your original post) because there are Windows files or applications on it. Was it connected to the system when you installed the OS on Disk 0 (C: drive)? Does the system work properly if you disconnect Disk 1? You could set the partition to inactive, but don't do it until you confirmed the system doesn't need it to boot.


Yes sorry It is the E: drive my mistake. I cannot remember correctly but originally my PC was running Windows 7 and I think only 1 drive was in at the time, however I may have left the E: drive in when installing Windows 8 Pro. However I accidentally cleaned the E: drive using Diskpart however I have now recovered that now and since then I have set the E: drive to inactive and Windows boots fine even without the drive in my PC (disconnected power).
Also i'm currently moving Windows from the old 80GB C: drive to a newer 500GB drive (the D: drive). Im cloning it currently and hopefully if that works this wont be an issue anymore. If you have a solution for removing any system files from the E: drive it would be appreciated but if this works it may not matter.
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a c 82 G Storage
June 4, 2014 11:49:15 AM

If it boots without the E: drive, then you could delete the Windows folder, Program Files (if no applications are installed on the E: drive, etc.
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June 4, 2014 8:14:07 PM

None of those folders are on the E: Drive
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June 5, 2014 4:57:08 AM

GhislainG said:
Presuming you configured Explorer to display system files, then you are sure the drive doesn't contain any. Since that drive isn't required to boot the system, just set the partition to inactive: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/197157-partition-m...


I since then I have marked the Partition as inactive using Diskpart however since reading your response I enabled view system files (previously disabled because was seeing too many files) and found a config.msi folder on my E: drive. After taking ownership of it I found inside a .rbf file with the name 3e7f9b5. Would this cause the partition to be labeled as system? Also do system volume infomation flag drives as system as I found that too and having previously stumbled upon them before I took ownership and looked inside but did not touch anything as previously issues had occurred with my flash drive.
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a c 82 G Storage
June 5, 2014 6:51:02 PM

Setting the partition to inactive should be enough; does the E: drive still show up as active after a system reboot? Was the E: drive ever used as a boot drive and not reformatted? You can delete the system volume information if you are sure the drive is not required for normal system operation.
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