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Adding more storage / Backing up TB's of Data

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June 6, 2014 10:41:21 AM

I am looking for the best solution to backup several TB's of data. I currently have my programs and operating systems installed on a 1TB internal HDD. I also have a 3TB internal HDD which contains my Blu-Ray movies and photos. I just filled up my 3TB storage drive and I need to determine a strategy for adding more storage. With 4K on the horizon I want to determine a strategy that will work for upwards of 10TB of data. I have been researching RAID-5 and RAID-10 as potential setups, however people state over and over again that RAID is not a backup - which brings me to my next dilemma...

Currently, none of my data is backed up which is incredibly scary. I need to back all of my data up ASAP. I purchased a free subscription to Crashplan however it has an estimated upload time of 3 months. Backing up to the cloud doesn't seem like a viable solution with multiple TB's of data.

Please help me determine the best way to add additional storage. Should I use a RAID? How do I truly backup the RAID?



a b G Storage
June 6, 2014 10:59:41 AM

Here is a clear diagram of RAID:
http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/08/raid-levels-tutoria...

If you want to add more storage and add redundancy, RAID 10 is a good option, however it is costly. What motherboard and/or RAID controller do you have?

If you just want a backup, you could buy a large external HDD and use that. Seagate has a 5TB external drive. Buy there are several options depending on how much you'd want to spend.
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June 6, 2014 11:15:24 AM

Thanks Martell,

Honestly, I forget the spec on the motherboard, I will look at it when I get home tonight and get back to you.

Although RAID 10 does offer redundancy, it doesn't protect against theft, fire, flood etc. Do you have any ideas for a true backup besides backing up to online company clouds?

In the RAID 10 shown here: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/08/raid-levels-tutoria... would it be possible to have Disk 1 and Disk 3 at my house and then Disk 2 and Disk 4 offsite?

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a b G Storage
June 6, 2014 11:35:41 AM

wrussel1 said:
Although RAID 10 does offer redundancy, it doesn't protect against theft, fire, flood etc. Do you have any ideas for a true backup besides backing up to online company clouds?

In the RAID 10 shown here: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/08/raid-levels-tutoria... would it be possible to have Disk 1 and Disk 3 at my house and then Disk 2 and Disk 4 offsite?


There are things like this:
http://www.amazon.com/WD-My-Cloud-EX2-featuring/dp/B00I...
That you could setup offsite and basically make your own "cloud" backup. Otherwise you could just go with a external HDD and store it offsite, bringing it back occasionally to perform backups.

RAID is an internal storage setup, mostly for servers, networked drives cannot be used in a RAID array, to the best of my knowledge, as that would make normal operation extremely slow. The data would have internet latency for access and writes.
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a b G Storage
June 6, 2014 11:46:26 AM

wrussel1 said:
Thanks Martell,

Honestly, I forget the spec on the motherboard, I will look at it when I get home tonight and get back to you.

Although RAID 10 does offer redundancy, it doesn't protect against theft, fire, flood etc. Do you have any ideas for a true backup besides backing up to online company clouds?

In the RAID 10 shown here: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/08/raid-levels-tutoria... would it be possible to have Disk 1 and Disk 3 at my house and then Disk 2 and Disk 4 offsite?



No it's not possible to split up the drives in a RAID array. They have to be attached to the same hardware controller.

The minimum requirements for eliminating any single point of failure leading to data loss is to use the 3-2-1 principal:
3 copies of your data
2 physical copies in your possession
1 Off-site or in the "cloud"

What I personally did since I was in the same situation with having to back up a lot of data to the cloud was...
I bought a 4 bay Home NAS starting with 2X3Tb drives in RAID1
I backed up all the data on my home computers and attached external storage to the NAS while starting the cloud backup from the NAS.
After the Backup to the cloud was complete, I added a third 3TB drive and rebuilt the system as a RAID 5.
Later I added a 4th drive and put it in RAID10.
Obviously that only gets me to 6TB, so I'll be getting 3X5Tb drives when they come down in price a bit and moving the 4X3TB drives into 2 separate 2Bay USB3.0 enclosures plugged into the 4 Bay NAS.
I may also just build a custom NAS and get 2 more 3Tb drives and put them in RAID10 for 9TB total.

If you want 10+TB of storage, you can get 3 or 4 5TB drives and put them in RAID5 or RAID10 in a 4 bay NAS while you upload your cloud backup and get a couple of 5 or 6TB external USB drives and rotate them for weekly backup offsite.
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a b G Storage
June 6, 2014 11:56:26 AM

Martell1977 said:
wrussel1 said:
Although RAID 10 does offer redundancy, it doesn't protect against theft, fire, flood etc. Do you have any ideas for a true backup besides backing up to online company clouds?

In the RAID 10 shown here: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/08/raid-levels-tutoria... would it be possible to have Disk 1 and Disk 3 at my house and then Disk 2 and Disk 4 offsite?


There are things like this:
http://www.amazon.com/WD-My-Cloud-EX2-featuring/dp/B00I...
That you could setup offsite and basically make your own "cloud" backup. Otherwise you could just go with a external HDD and store it offsite, bringing it back occasionally to perform backups.

RAID is an internal storage setup, mostly for servers, networked drives cannot be used in a RAID array, to the best of my knowledge, as that would make normal operation extremely slow. The data would have internet latency for access and writes.


This is a good option as well, but I wouldn't recommend RAID0 with high density drives for a backup device. Though you could start with the diskless option and put 6Tb drives in RAID1. You'd obviously have to wait until higher capacity drives come out of have a separate USB drive attached to the NAS for the future.
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June 7, 2014 4:00:21 PM

TyrOd said:
wrussel1 said:
Thanks Martell,

Honestly, I forget the spec on the motherboard, I will look at it when I get home tonight and get back to you.

Although RAID 10 does offer redundancy, it doesn't protect against theft, fire, flood etc. Do you have any ideas for a true backup besides backing up to online company clouds?

In the RAID 10 shown here: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/08/raid-levels-tutoria... would it be possible to have Disk 1 and Disk 3 at my house and then Disk 2 and Disk 4 offsite?



No it's not possible to split up the drives in a RAID array. They have to be attached to the same hardware controller.

The minimum requirements for eliminating any single point of failure leading to data loss is to use the 3-2-1 principal:
3 copies of your data
2 physical copies in your possession
1 Off-site or in the "cloud"

What I personally did since I was in the same situation with having to back up a lot of data to the cloud was...
I bought a 4 bay Home NAS starting with 2X3Tb drives in RAID1
I backed up all the data on my home computers and attached external storage to the NAS while starting the cloud backup from the NAS.
After the Backup to the cloud was complete, I added a third 3TB drive and rebuilt the system as a RAID 5.
Later I added a 4th drive and put it in RAID10.
Obviously that only gets me to 6TB, so I'll be getting 3X5Tb drives when they come down in price a bit and moving the 4X3TB drives into 2 separate 2Bay USB3.0 enclosures plugged into the 4 Bay NAS.
I may also just build a custom NAS and get 2 more 3Tb drives and put them in RAID10 for 9TB total.

If you want 10+TB of storage, you can get 3 or 4 5TB drives and put them in RAID5 or RAID10 in a 4 bay NAS while you upload your cloud backup and get a couple of 5 or 6TB external USB drives and rotate them for weekly backup offsite.


Thank you very much for your reply. Very helpful. I think that I will backup everything I have now on an external hard drive while I'm backing up to the cloud. While I'm backing up to the cloud I can purchase a 4 bay NAS setup in RAID 10. I think this might be solution I will be using.

I finally got info on my motherboard. It's an ASUS P8Z68-V LX. It doesn't appear that it has any RAID controller built in. I will have to start researching how to setup the RAID10.
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