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Very Slow Network Speed

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  • Networking
Last response: in Networking
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June 13, 2014 4:54:39 AM

I have a problem that I am hoping that someone might be able to advise me with.
The problem is when I transfer large files from my desktop computer to my HTPS I get a reported transferring speed of only 11 to 12 MB/sec.
The details are listed below:
I presently have two computers on my local area network, one is a PC workstation system with a built in 10/100/1000 megabyte network connection. The other computer is a HTPC that has the same 10/100/1000 megabyte network connection which is also integrated the motherboard. Connecting these two computers I have CAT5e cable that should support 1000Mb transfer rate, however I am getting only the 11 to 12 MB/sec of data transfer.
When I go into control panel on both systems then networking and sharing center and view my network card it shows it running ay 100 MB/sec.
This network has a TP-Link router that connects to my ISP, it is limited to a maximum of 100 Mb/s. In addition to this I have a second router made by Linksys it is a Wireless G 2.4 Ghz. model which again is limited to a maximum of 100 megabytes.
The routers and computers are wired like this, the TP-Link router connects to my ADSL line, this router is then connected to the Linksys Router using one of the standard RG45 ports on the back. The two computers are then each connected to the Linksys router using an additional two ports of this router.
As a note with the Wireless Router I presently do not use the port designated Cable/DSL Modem but rather use one of the 4 additional RJ45 ports to connect the ADSL router to.
I have been thinking about getting 1 GB switch installed but I think I need to find out why I cannot even hit the 100MB/sec. transfer rate.
I will greatly appreciate comments on this problem!

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June 13, 2014 6:55:02 AM

You transfer speeds from computer to computer are going to be limited by your disks and cpus as well as the network. Does your HTPC have a low power (and low capacity) CPU or laptop hard drive? Either of those things could limit you. A 10MB (Bytes -- big B) transfer is being limited by your 100Mb (bits -- little b) network. With a gigabit capable network you should get 4X that throughput. You would insert a gigabit switch off the TP-Link LAN port and then connect EVERYTHING else into the switch rather than the TP-Link router.
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June 13, 2014 6:57:07 AM

What model is your Linksys router? If it only has a 100Mbit connection then your numbers are right on. You say your getting 11 to 12 Megabytes/s transfer speed which is equal to 88 to 96Megabits/s. Anything around 90Mbits/s is about the best you can hope for in a 100Mbit network. Now if I misunderstood your post and the Linksys has a Gigabit switch built in then we need to look further for the answer. If not, then getting a Gigabit switch should speed things up somewhat. If you upgrade to Gigabit speeds then your next bottleneck will most likely be your hard drives.
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June 13, 2014 6:58:24 AM

Answer is simple Gb is not GB also Mb is not MB.
1Gb switch will give you max transfer of 110-120 MB/s 100Mb switch will give you 11-12 MB/s which is the numbers you are getting now.
So again you are messing units 1 byte = 8 bits, 1 MB (byte) = 8Mb (bits)... so on.
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Best solution

June 13, 2014 1:38:28 PM

Hello Canuk,

I think there is a slight misconception, 1000 megabits per second is 125 megabytes per second Theoretical throughput, which means it will not necessarily hit that speed, it is also based on the speed of your hard disk. So in actuality you will never hit that speed.

If you want faster speed then in this case you could upgrade your hard drive to SSD and maybe upgrade your cpu (just maybe).
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June 13, 2014 4:43:01 PM

Hello All;
After posting this comment I went to bed and thought about this, it occurred to me that I might have misinterpreted what MBps meant versus Mbps., I understand what bits are versus bytes but in my mind it did not register. Checked it out this morning and sure enough I had misread the text, from what I read 100Mbps on a home system will yield a maximum speed of 12.5MBps.
Thank you every one for the replies, as my communication speed is near the maximum range of 12.5MBps this then means that I am operating near the top end of the 100Mbps range.
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June 13, 2014 4:56:06 PM

Yeah
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