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how to make the cpu shiny by lapping?

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June 16, 2014 10:05:58 AM

i tried to lap my 8350, the copper got exposed but it isnt shiny yet.
how do i make it shiny? i used 240, 360, 600, 1000, 1500 and 2000 grit sandpaper.
also please dont tell me that lapping is not worth it.

More about : make cpu shiny lapping

June 17, 2014 6:17:08 PM

XCalinX said:
i tried to lap my 8350, the copper got exposed but it isnt shiny yet.
how do i make it shiny? i used 240, 360, 600, 1000, 1500 and 2000 grit sandpaper.
also please dont tell me that lapping is not worth it.


Buddy, lapping really isn't worth it. You're voiding your warranty for an extra 2-5 degrees Celsius. If you want to have a cooler temperature, look into liquid nitrogen cooling...then you can have your CPU at -100C or below. Or if you're even more serious than that...use Liquid Helium and get your CPU to -230C.

But if you insist...use 600, then 800, then 1000, then 1500. Use the 600 or 800 to get the flatness you want (which will indeed take a few hours.) Then after that, use 1000 grit for 20 minutes or so and then 1500 for another 20. You don't need it to be perfectly reflective because the whole point of thermal paste is to compensate for any scratches...but you need to make sure you get it flat. In reality...1000 grit is enough but a slightly better surface finish is great to have. You could use 2000 after the 1500 if you really want it to be smooth.

By using 240 and 360 grit...you may have just killed your CPU...:no: 

I really wouldn't recommend doing this...any kind of bodily oil from your fingers that you get on the pads on the bottom can cause it not to have proper contact when you re-install it.
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June 18, 2014 10:03:03 AM

LogicalProcessing said:
XCalinX said:
i tried to lap my 8350, the copper got exposed but it isnt shiny yet.
how do i make it shiny? i used 240, 360, 600, 1000, 1500 and 2000 grit sandpaper.
also please dont tell me that lapping is not worth it.


Buddy, lapping really isn't worth it. You're voiding your warranty for an extra 2-5 degrees Celsius. If you want to have a cooler temperature, look into liquid nitrogen cooling...then you can have your CPU at -100C or below. Or if you're even more serious than that...use Liquid Helium and get your CPU to -230C.

But if you insist...use 600, then 800, then 1000, then 1500. Use the 600 or 800 to get the flatness you want (which will indeed take a few hours.) Then after that, use 1000 grit for 20 minutes or so and then 1500 for another 20. You don't need it to be perfectly reflective because the whole point of thermal paste is to compensate for any scratches...but you need to make sure you get it flat. In reality...1000 grit is enough but a slightly better surface finish is great to have. You could use 2000 after the 1500 if you really want it to be smooth.

By using 240 and 360 grit...you may have just killed your CPU...:no: 

I really wouldn't recommend doing this...any kind of bodily oil from your fingers that you get on the pads on the bottom can cause it not to have proper contact when you re-install it.

Well I lost 10c (on stock) Gonna OC it soon.
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June 18, 2014 12:21:54 PM

I'm not familiar with AMD processors...
If we exclude the fact that you will lose your warranty, the lapping; it still improves the transfer of heat, but the gains depends on the subject skills, and if the work it was done well... otherwise temps get even worse.
~10°C? you have done a good job.

The "shiny mirror effect" is mostly a cool thing, nothing more.
Anyway you need some "abrasive paste" I do not remember what it's called in English (it's often used for the finishing of the car bodywork to make it shiny).
You have to put this abrasive paste on a cotton wool and use it with circular movements more or less strong.
If you will use it, at the end do not forget to clean (many times) the surface treated by the abrasive paste with some isotropic alcohol to remove the residue.

I personally have used a special paste which is also used on painted surfaces to remove the scratches, but I previously used some waterproof abrasive paper in latex (silicon carbide) 600/1200/2000 wetted with water, which already gave me the mirror effect, then I used the paste I was talking about for make it shiny and eliminate the few micro scratches left on the surface.

p.s. ofc you do everything at your own risk, in my case I had the IHS off, so that I could work without the risk of breaking something, just saying.

Cheers.
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