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XP, Vista & 7 program testing with one keyboard and mouse

Last response: in Systems
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June 17, 2014 5:43:04 AM

I'm testing programs on different computers with different OS. One runs with Windows XP, one with Windows Vista and one with Windows 7. Instead of running each test 3 times I would really like to be able to run it all at once controlling all 3 computers with one keyboard and one mouse simultaneously. This would help me save a lot of time and simplify the testing as I will know the exact same thing would be done on all 3. So if one breaks it would be the Os not that I did something lightly differently the time I tested the program by manually switching computers as I'm forced to do today through a switch. Hopefully it would be some sort of system that I can expand on when I get more computers to run extra OS on.
June 17, 2014 5:54:48 AM

Ok, I think I understand what you are asking. Could you just get a 3 way USB splitter for your mouse and keyboard?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-USB-2-0-male-to-USB-male-an...

I would be worried about the devices being powered by 3 computers though. I don't know what would happen. You are best off running each test separately is my best guess.
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a b * Windows 8
a b $ Windows 7
June 17, 2014 5:56:38 AM

Run them in virtual machines, therefore they would all be using the exact same hardware configuration.
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June 17, 2014 6:01:00 AM

das_stig said:
Run them in virtual machines, therefore they would all be using the exact same hardware configuration.

That is what I originally thought, but it looks like OP wants to use different machines.
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June 17, 2014 6:05:42 AM

Yes, it is important that they have different hardware configurations to test the program for as many variations as possible. I've never seen a USB splitter that splits so one keyboard and mouse could be used for many computers at the same time. I'll look in to that link and see if that might be what I've been looking for.
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a c 450 * Windows 8
a c 594 $ Windows 7
June 17, 2014 6:06:18 AM

KuphJr said:
das_stig said:
Run them in virtual machines, therefore they would all be using the exact same hardware configuration.

That is what I originally thought, but it looks like OP wants to use different machines.


And he appears to want the same keystrokes/mouse movements transmitted to all three at the same time.

I don't think that exists.
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June 17, 2014 8:02:49 AM

Yes, that is correct, that would be a dream come true. If the program crashes or produces an error on one computer and not the other 2 I would know much easier what broke it as I can rule out a lot of things from the other two computer set-ups. Sorry to hear that no one ever heard of this being done. I thought I had years ago. Thus me asking here as I've had no luck looking for it myself online.
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a c 450 * Windows 8
a c 594 $ Windows 7
June 17, 2014 8:07:28 AM

A much better way to do this is with a scripted testing application.

There are many testing applications that do this. You create a script to perform all the clicks and keystrokes. Create once, run many times. This completely removes user error and interaction from the test environment.
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June 17, 2014 8:21:01 AM

USAFRet said:
A much better way to do this is with a scripted testing application.

There are many testing applications that do this. You create a script to perform all the clicks and keystrokes. Create once, run many times. This completely removes user error and interaction from the test environment.


I initiallythought about some sort of Bot, and I even tried it, but the program being tested have lots of random parts that doesn't work with bots as it pulls information from a third party feed online which it creates a situation from and the user is required to respond to that in the correct way.
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June 17, 2014 11:47:00 AM

You could get some old USB cables, strip the ends, find out which wire is which (positive, negative, ect.) and wire up a keyboard and mouse that way.

What you would do is take a female USB cable and plug the mouse or keyboard into it. Then strip the end of the female USB cable and get 3 male USB cables and strip them as well. Connect the female wires to the wires on the 3 male USB cables but only attach the positive and negative wires on the female USB cable to ONE of the male cables. This will ensure you won't short out the keyboard. To tell which cable is which the cables are usually colored inside the casing. I have no idea if it will work but you should be able to use cables you have laying around.

If you don't understand I can draw a picture and post it.
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June 17, 2014 2:12:52 PM

Pictures would help. Sadly I'm no engineer. But it sounds promising.
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June 17, 2014 5:51:32 PM

I'll get on it. I've been working all day. You will have a picture in a few minutes.
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!