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Is Cooler Master Hyper TX3 EVO Cooler is better than Stock CPU cooler of AMD FX 8350 Processor

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June 17, 2014 6:53:05 AM

Dear All,
My Rig Configuration:
CPU: ASUS FX 8350 with Stock Cooler fan
MOBO: ASUS M5A97 LE R 2.0
GPU: NVIDIA GTX520 silent, 2GB DDR 3
RAM: CORSAIR VENGENCE DDR 3 1X8 GB (1600MHz)
SMPS: CORSAIR VS 550
OS: WIN 7 PRO,32BIT

Present perfomace: All cores temperature normally stay to 20~30 degree
All cores Temperature hits Maximum 40~50 while playing games like
BF3,NFS,Batman Arkham city.

Can you please tell me if "Cooler Master Hyper TX3 EVO Cooler" would be a better in performace over the Stock cooler provided with the AMD FX 8350 CPU?{I am not at this point thinking to OC as performance is pretty good} I have this Cooler Master Hyper TX3 EVO Cooler from my earlier system Hence thinking if it would be good to switch over Cooler master CPU then the stock provide. your Valuable feedback will help me Save some bucks to invest in extra RAM or upgrading GPU. Please advice.


Best Regards,
Suman

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a b à CPUs
June 17, 2014 7:02:02 AM

stock cooling unit will be better... there's no reason to mess with your processor. it's temps are fine, and with such a low end video card, there's no reason to overclock your CPU

are you aware that 32bit windows 7 can only use 3.5gb of RAM? so your 8gb stick is half wasted
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June 17, 2014 7:07:51 AM

lowriderflow said:
stock cooling unit will be better... there's no reason to mess with your processor. it's temps are fine, and with such a low end video card, there's no reason to overclock your CPU

are you aware that 32bit windows 7 can only use 3.5gb of RAM? so your 8gb stick is half wasted


Hello Lowrider, Million thanks for this quick help. I was wondering if the Cooler master will help further reduce the temperature. Thanks.
2nd point was really a eye opening for me. I am little new on this as I didnt know that 32 bit have this issue. do it means that it will not support any more RAMs Even I am gonna add another 8 GB :(  . So does 64Bit will support all games and applications what I use on general basis?

MAny thanks in advance.
Best Regards,
Suman
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a c 983 à CPUs
June 17, 2014 7:10:04 AM

The Cooler Master Hyper TX3 EVO is no better than a stock cooler.
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a b à CPUs
June 17, 2014 7:29:41 AM

Installing Windows 7 Home 64Bit will allow you to use up to 16GB of RAM. Windows 7 PRO 64Bit will allow you to use up to 128GB of RAM.
However the software is only half of the equation, The motherboard you have listed can handle up to 32 GB. To take full advantage of that then you will need Win 7 Pro 64bit. You will not be able to simply upgrade from a 32bit system to a 64, you will need to back your data up and install the new O/S over your existing system.

As for compatibility, I have Windows 7Home on one of my machines and Win7Pro on the other, both are 64bit and I have not noticed any issues with any programs. The only time you would need to keep your eyes open is when installing drivers for older parts, make sure the drivers are compatible with win7 64.
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June 17, 2014 8:49:28 AM

Thanks DHFF for throwing good light :)  , So As of Now If I install Win 7 Pro 64 bit in other drive then I can upgrade to 32GB RAM in my Rig which will utilize the RAM to MAX? Right? Yes, Thanks for the info. I am thinking to utilize other WD 2TB HDD to install win7 Pro 64bit. How About WIN7 ULTIMATE? What differences its from PRO?
Yes Compatibility issues I think would be there with some Applications so I am upgrading GPU soon...
was wondering if I can install dual OS (Win7 PRO 32 and WIN7 PRO 64) in same HDD with Different Partition drives? ... Mostly its -ve right?
So alternate option would be to install win7pro 64 in other HDD..?
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June 17, 2014 9:35:51 AM

The cleanest option is to install them on separate drives. Its a little easier to install and to uninstall when you grow tired of the 32bit version. Just un-plug all your drives, plug in the new drive and install the 64bit O/S. then after install you can plug your other drives in. To switch between O/S just go into your BIOS when you turn the computer on (usually by hitting the DEL key) There you can configure which drive to boot from by default. From this screen you can also select a drive to boot to for that session only without changing the order.


Another option is to leave your other drives in place when you are installing the 64bit Windows. Going this route gives you a menu that loads during boot that lets you select the O/S you want to use. The disadvantage is that sometimes Windows installs bits of itself on the other drives that are present so if you remove one of them later on, it may effect your 64bit install.

As for Ultimate, I personally wouldn't bother. performance wise there is no difference between Pro and Ultimate. Ultimate has some extra bells and whistles but nothing that you need to worry about unless you are working withing a corporate network environment.

Honestly once you get all your programs installed and settled, I don't see you switching back and forth much, the new system will look and operate identical to the windows you use now, the only differences are internal, allowing the O/S to make use of your hardware. In your case its not just the RAM that you are not getting full use of but the CPU as well. I just looked at your specs again and noticed you are using the FX8350, that is an 8 core chip. a 32bit O/S can only see 4 of them. This will come in handy if you do a lot of multi tasking but if you mainly play games you may not notice a difference because most games rarely make use of more then 2 cores at any given time, much less 8. If you tend to have 12 different programs open and you juggle back and forth and do a lot of data processing then you will enjoy the 64 bit's ability to see 100% of your CPU.
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June 17, 2014 10:51:03 AM

DHFF said:
The cleanest option is to install them on separate drives. Its a little easier to install and to uninstall when you grow tired of the 32bit version. Just un-plug all your drives, plug in the new drive and install the 64bit O/S. then after install you can plug your other drives in. To switch between O/S just go into your BIOS when you turn the computer on (usually by hitting the DEL key) There you can configure which drive to boot from by default. From this screen you can also select a drive to boot to for that session only without changing the order.


Another option is to leave your other drives in place when you are installing the 64bit Windows. Going this route gives you a menu that loads during boot that lets you select the O/S you want to use. The disadvantage is that sometimes Windows installs bits of itself on the other drives that are present so if you remove one of them later on, it may effect your 64bit install.

As for Ultimate, I personally wouldn't bother. performance wise there is no difference between Pro and Ultimate. Ultimate has some extra bells and whistles but nothing that you need to worry about unless you are working withing a corporate network environment.

Honestly once you get all your programs installed and settled, I don't see you switching back and forth much, the new system will look and operate identical to the windows you use now, the only differences are internal, allowing the O/S to make use of your hardware. In your case its not just the RAM that you are not getting full use of but the CPU as well. I just looked at your specs again and noticed you are using the FX8350, that is an 8 core chip. a 32bit O/S can only see 4 of them. This will come in handy if you do a lot of multi tasking but if you mainly play games you may not notice a difference because most games rarely make use of more then 2 cores at any given time, much less 8. If you tend to have 12 different programs open and you juggle back and forth and do a lot of data processing then you will enjoy the 64 bit's ability to see 100% of your CPU.


Great Write,Thanks a million for such a clean and authenticate explanation. 3 kudos for you bro. I am completely happy with your all inputs. I will do this for new HDD and will upgrade RAM to 32 GB :) .. stick to 64 bit going ahead :) 
Best Wishes to you
Suman

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a b à CPUs
June 17, 2014 11:53:14 AM

Glad I could help.
When I upgraded from XP to Win 7, I held on much the way you were planning to, I thought I would be spending a lot of time switching back and forth but once I got all my preferences set up I find that I rarely look at Win XP any more. there is really no advantage it offers over the newer system.

Back in the todler days of 64 bit Opperating systems with XP64, there was a lot of good reason to have a duel boot with both 32 and 64 because you would often find a lot of programs not working or find that XP64 didnt have drivers for many things but that was almost 15 years ago and the computer and software market has come a long way.

If you want one final speed boost you might want to look at getting an SSD drive to house that 64bit Windows. SSD or solid state drives are on average 5x faster then regular drives and it is the most obvious way to boost the speed on your system, you will notice the difference from that a lot more then adding RAM. Prices on SSDs have come down quite a bit too and these days you can get a decent 250GB drive for a little over $100. What most people do is install windows on a small SSD, (mine is only 120) and then use a traditional drive for storage. This way your computer boots fast (mine boots in 9 seconds) and programs open quickly. then when you save files or download programs you can direct them to save on the larger HDD.

If you need anything else I am always happy to help. feel free to private message me if you want.
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June 17, 2014 11:31:33 PM

DHFF said:
Glad I could help.
When I upgraded from XP to Win 7, I held on much the way you were planning to, I thought I would be spending a lot of time switching back and forth but once I got all my preferences set up I find that I rarely look at Win XP any more. there is really no advantage it offers over the newer system.

Back in the todler days of 64 bit Opperating systems with XP64, there was a lot of good reason to have a duel boot with both 32 and 64 because you would often find a lot of programs not working or find that XP64 didnt have drivers for many things but that was almost 15 years ago and the computer and software market has come a long way.

If you want one final speed boost you might want to look at getting an SSD drive to house that 64bit Windows. SSD or solid state drives are on average 5x faster then regular drives and it is the most obvious way to boost the speed on your system, you will notice the difference from that a lot more then adding RAM. Prices on SSDs have come down quite a bit too and these days you can get a decent 250GB drive for a little over $100. What most people do is install windows on a small SSD, (mine is only 120) and then use a traditional drive for storage. This way your computer boots fast (mine boots in 9 seconds) and programs open quickly. then when you save files or download programs you can direct them to save on the larger HDD.

If you need anything else I am always happy to help. feel free to private message me if you want.


Really appreciate time taken. it was a good info and handy help, I was also working towards upgrading GPU,which in other forum said its low end. so building a good rig is costing me a lot now. another 350$ for GPU(Asus AMD/ATI R9 270X Direct CUII 2GB GDDR5 Graphics Card) and then a blue ray player(LITON), i will buy another 8GB(Corsair Vengeance 8GB DDR3 x1) ram as of now. Do you think if I upgrade GB to32 max.it would be worth for this build rig where Window 7 64BIT will utilize fully my system?
Of course I will private message you if any further help is required. Many thanks and appreciate your support for providing me window for this :D 
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June 18, 2014 6:57:13 AM

Our first rig always falls under expectations. It is part of the process as you always know more tomorrow then you did yesterday. I was patting myself on the back with my first build only to be slapping my forehead months later thinking "man I should have gotten blah blah blah instead....idiot!". It is all good though, each build is better as you learn more, its part of the fun...expensive fun but fun none the less.

As far as how much power you need, computers are a slippery slope. I am building a workstation for my wife currently and when I ask her how much she wants to spend, she asks me "well what is best?" its hard to answer because the more you spend the "better" it becomes but really the question is how much do you need? if all you are doing is reading web pages and using MS word then a $4000 Gaming rig is a little overkill. So maxing your computer out isnt always needed. In my current rig I have 16GB of RAM, I have another 16 sitting on my work bench but I have yet to install it because I dont feel its needed. My computer rarely uses more then 50% of the memory at any given time and you will find that this is true for most users. unless you are building the system for a specific need that requires gobs of memory, you might find that 32GB is a waste.
16GB of DDR is pretty pricy right now too, for that money you could get a really decent monitor or a huge hard drive or a speedy little SSD, or upgrade the cooler on your CPU and still have money left over for lunch :) 

As to the video card, I would ask the same as before, look at what you play and what you need. No the card you have is not the fastest but does it handle what you need? My gaming rig only has a GTX 650 with 1GB of GDDR5. However 90% of the games I play are turn based games like Civilization. I occasionally play a little Diablo III and some Skyrim. For what I play, I dont feel like I am missing anything.

That being said, if you do play lots of intense games or want to be ready for something like Star Citizen, then I might recommend the following:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
It has a little more punch then what you listed and its about $100 cheaper.

For the RAM I would suggest upgrading your O/S then give yourself another 8GB of Ram to put your system at 16GB total. give that a spin and see if you feel the need for more speed. RAM is the quickest and easiest upgrade you will come across.

BTW when you do install that next chip of RAM, make sure they are install one slot away from each other, (have both chips in the blue slots or the black slots) this will set the system for duel channel and your RAM will work faster.

Let me know if you have any other questions or curiosities.
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