Solved

Power supply keeps dying - 3rd PSU within 1 month

My power supply keeps dying on me. Everything worked fine for years then moved into a new house last October. No issues until last month (Mid May). Power supply died, so I got a warranty replacement that lasted 1 week before dying. Second warranty replacement (3rd PSU) lasted 2 hours and just died. My system is as follows:

Motherboard: Gigabyte H55M-UD2H
CPU: Intel Core i3 550 (3.2GHz)
RAM: 16GB (4x4GB) 1600MHz Corsair Vengeance CMZ16GX3M4A1600C9
HDD1: Western Digital Caviar Green 1TB (WD10EACS)
HDD2: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB (WD1001FALS)
HDD3: Western Digital Caviar Green 1.5TB (WD15EADS)
DVD-RW: LG GH22NP20 (22X)
Graphics: nVidia GeForce GTS 450 (Gigabyte GV-N450-1GI)
PSU: Thermaltake TR2-500W (all 3)

All is plugged into a Belkin Surgemaster powerbar F9H600-04, along with 2 LCD monitors, printer, speakers and router.

Any ideas what could be causing this? A 3rd faulty PSU is unlikely...
14 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about power supply dying 3rd psu month
  1. Thermaltakes are terrible, look at the very bottom, you'll find that PSU you have :P
    http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-1804779/power-supply-unit-tier-list.html

    Try this one, it's gotta be the best 550w right now for the price.
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/xfx-power-supply-p1550sxxb9
  2. Thermaltake TR2 is run a mile.
  3. If it is the line input side that keeps failing, then your problem is most likely bad utility power or house wiring.

    At my previous apartment, power was so bad it killed two of my displays and one of my PSUs. AC line voltage was surging to at least 130V on my slow-ass multimeter so the real peaks were likely higher.
  4. Most switch-mode stuff should be good for up to ~280V, I would expect. Rapid change in voltage might not be so great, though.
  5. I don't think it's an issue with the line voltage - the power bar / surge protector should take care of any power spikes. Plus I have a lot of other stuff plugged into the same bar (as mentioned above) and haven't had power issues anywhere else in the house. Either way, I will definitely check it when I get home.

    I'll also look into a new PSU. Just waiting to hear back from Thermaltake RMA - I've developed a relationship with them over the past month!
  6. Best answer
    Yeah, the problem is it being a TR2. One of the lowest quality power supplies on the market - in line with Raidmax.
  7. mekeng said:
    I don't think it's an issue with the line voltage - the power bar / surge protector should take care of any power spikes.

    I used to think so too.

    All my equipment that blew up due to bad line power was plugged into power strips with surge suppressors but surge suppressors do not protect against line voltage fluctuations or surges that are below their MOVs operating threshold which is usually in the neighborhood of 200V before they start doing anything and this is enough to accommodate AC line voltages up to 140Vrms.

    If you have incandescent lighting and aren't seeing dimming/brightening when major appliances start running elsewhere in the house/apartment then that probably is not it. But if you do, this becomes a definite possibility.
  8. InvalidError said:
    mekeng said:
    I don't think it's an issue with the line voltage - the power bar / surge protector should take care of any power spikes.

    I used to think so too.

    All my equipment that blew up due to bad line power was plugged into power strips with surge suppressors but surge suppressors do not protect against line voltage fluctuations or surges that are below their MOVs operating threshold which is usually in the neighborhood of 200V before they start doing anything and this is enough to accommodate AC line voltages up to 140Vrms.

    If you have incandescent lighting and aren't seeing dimming/brightening when major appliances start running elsewhere in the house/apartment then that probably is not it. But if you do, this becomes a definite possibility.


    I measured the incoming voltage and frequency at the wall outlet and power bar outlet with a professional multimeter (Fluke). I was getting 122VAC at 60Hz, stable (+/- 1VAC, 0.01 Hz). No noticeable fluctuations with incandescent lights when major appliances are powered on. Also heard back from Thermaltake RMA who said my system is probably underpowered at 500W and I need at least 600W. Checked the graphics card specs and it recommends 400W minimum system power, but that doesn't take into account my extra HDD's and RAM...

    One other possibility I've heard about is a grounding issue with the MB. Does this seems likely?

    Either way, I'm looking at getting a new power supply (XFX PRO Series 750W or Thermaltake Toughpower 750W) and a new surge suppressor (APC P11VNT3 Performance SurgeArrest). I'm ordering the parts online and should have them within a week or so (using my laptop in the meantime, as I have been for the past 1-1/2 months). Thanks everyone for the advice and tips, and I will let you know if this resolves the issue.
  9. XFX PRO Series 750W < Get this one the Thermaltake is poor.
  10. It is DEFINITELY not underpowered. Your entire system is looking at max peak draw of about 300w. For them to say at least 600w just means they have no faith in that model of power supplies to deliver stated power reliably.

    You definitely do not need to spend the money on a 750w power supply. This XFX would be more than enough power, and is top qality:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Power Supply: XFX 550W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($45.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $45.99
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-06-20 09:54 EDT-0400
  11. mekeng said:
    Also heard back from Thermaltake RMA who said my system is probably underpowered at 500W and I need at least 600W. Checked the graphics card specs and it recommends 400W minimum system power, but that doesn't take into account my extra HDD's and RAM...

    Your PC should be closer to 200W so if Thermaltake thinks their 500W PSU is not enough, that certainly smells fishy.

    Apparently, the TR2-500 is a rebadged ChannelWell 450W...
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/cases/display/thermaltake-psu-roundup_24.html
  12. InvalidError said:
    mekeng said:
    Also heard back from Thermaltake RMA who said my system is probably underpowered at 500W and I need at least 600W. Checked the graphics card specs and it recommends 400W minimum system power, but that doesn't take into account my extra HDD's and RAM...

    Your PC should be closer to 200W so if Thermaltake thinks their 500W PSU is not enough, that certainly smells fishy.

    Apparently, the TR2-500 is a rebadged ChannelWell 450W...
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/cases/display/thermaltake-psu-roundup_24.html


    Apparently that's a link to a review for a discontinued model of the TR2 500W. There are at least four different models of the TR2 500W.


    Thermaltake TR2 500W (W0379RU) - Discontinued
    • ODM/OEM: HEC (a.k.a. Compucase)
    • maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 35 Amps
    • one 6-pin and one (6+2)-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors
    • Modular Output Cables: No

    Thermaltake TR2 500W (W0093) - Discontinued
    • ODM/OEM: CWT (Channel Well Technology)
    • maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 29 Amps
    • one 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector
    • Modular Output Cables: No

    Thermaltake TR2 500W (TR-500) TR2-500NL2NC
    • ODM/OEM: CWT (Channel Well Technology)
    • maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 36 Amps
    • one 6-pin and one (6+2)-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors
    • Modular Output Cables: No

    Thermaltake TR2 500W (TR-500P)
    • ODM/OEM: FSP
    • maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 36 Amps
    • one 6-pin and one (6+2)-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors
    • Modular Output Cables: No

    The OP most likely has the Thermaltake TR2 500W (TR-500) TR2-500NL2NC.
  13. InvalidError said:
    mekeng said:
    Also heard back from Thermaltake RMA who said my system is probably underpowered at 500W and I need at least 600W. Checked the graphics card specs and it recommends 400W minimum system power, but that doesn't take into account my extra HDD's and RAM...

    Your PC should be closer to 200W so if Thermaltake thinks their 500W PSU is not enough, that certainly smells fishy.

    Apparently, the TR2-500 is a rebadged ChannelWell 450W...
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/cases/display/thermaltake-psu-roundup_24.html


    I know it's been a month since the last post, but I've been a bit busy and haven't had the time to deal with this. The issue still isn't resolved and I'm thinking it's less and less likely to be a power issue. Thermaltake RMA got back to me and turns out I've been testing the PSU wrong... I forgot to jumper the ground (green) and negative (black) wire on the MB connector so the PSU wasn't powering up when I tested it. With the jumper in place, the PSU works fine and all voltages check out. The HDD's and DVD drive will power up fine, as will the GPU.

    However, when I plug the PSU into the MB (24 pin connector) and the CPU (4 pin ATX), nothing happens. I tried this several times (unplug everything, plug it back in and try to power on) and then, randomly, my computer turned on! Everything seemed fine and then it "died" again when I started using it. Checked the PSU with jumper in place and power is ok. Plugged it back into the MB and nothing...

    Eventually I got the computer powered on again and tested the RAM over several days using the Windows 7 memory diagnostic, SiSandra, and Memtest+ x86 (multiple passes on each) - neither detected any errors. I plugged everything back in (HHD's, GPU, DVD) and stress tested using SiSandra - no errors detected on anything. Started using my computer again yesterday for the first time in a month and it "died" again. PSU is ok and powers up when jumpered, but won't do anything when plugged into the MB. So I disconnected the PSU, waited 30 min or so, plugged it back into the MB and it powered up.

    This is frustrating because I don't know what can be causing this. Right now the computer is powered on but I'm not using it. The GPU is removed, but everything else is connected. I've also checked the MB stand-offs to make sure I didn't miss any or have any extra ones connected. The unused ones don't have any shorts that I can see either.

    Still think this is a PSU issue? I'm leaning more toward MB or MB/GPU/RAM compatibility, though I don't know why it would have worked for over 2 years without any issues. One other thing is that the computer always "died" when I was on YouTube. I don't know if this is a coincidence or pointing to a GPU problem...
  14. mekeng said:
    Still think this is a PSU issue? I'm leaning more toward MB or MB/GPU/RAM compatibility,

    A CPU/RAM/MoBo/GPU compatibility issue would not allow the computer to run fine through hours of burn-in and days of normal operation and, mysteriously fail out of the blue and then refuse to boot.

    Something is causing power-up issues. It could be the motheboard having flaky/defective soft-power management, the GPU drawing excessive current during POST, the PSU over/under-shooting rails during power-up, etc.

    Without an oscilloscope to directly look at what is happening on each rail and key signal during power-up when the PC refuses to turn on, the only thing we have is educated guesses and statistics.
Ask a new question

Read More

Power Supplies Desktops Components Gigabyte Thermaltake