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i7 920 to 4770k worth the upgrade?

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June 21, 2014 8:43:32 PM

I have a quad core i7 920 @ 2.66Ghz from 2009 which has served me well, but I'm running a hungry single-threaded application that sometimes gets bogged down. Thinking of upgrading to a 4770k at 3.5Ghz with new mobo and ram. I seem to be having a hard time finding out how much of a speed increase I may expect. Some people say 50% or more in single threaded apps, others say maybe 20% at best and it's not worth the upgrade. Wonder what people on this board think? Note: my 920 is not overclocked.

Thanks in advance!
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June 21, 2014 9:07:11 PM

I wouldn't bother with the 4770 since the 4790's release, atleast not at their current prices. In passmark the 920 scores 5005 the 4779k scores 10303 and the 4790k scores 11948. I would call that upgrade worth it.
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June 22, 2014 2:21:09 AM

The difference will be huge, about 50% most likely, there is an entire 1 Ghz difference between the two, but it is not only the clock speed that makes this a good upgrade, new architecture is employed, not only does it make it faster but also spends a lot less electricity also, 50% less, in a single-threaded apps you will see big improvement, i-4770k can be overclocked more easily since is it unlocked and if you know how to do it you can go well over 4 Ghz, my recommendation is to wait for i7-4790k which will start to sell in a few days I think, the price diff is going to be small and i'd say it is worth it, anybody who owns i7-4770k shouldnt really bother since it is not a major diff, but since you will be buying a new cpu unless the price diff between the two is big, i see no reason not to wait a few days and buy i7-4790k, hope this helps
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June 22, 2014 12:57:49 PM

Thanks guys, follow up question: I understand the 4770 K can overclock which is an advantage, but on the other hand, the 4770 has support for transactional memory, virtualization, and I think a few other things too. are any of the extra features in the 4770 things I may use and benefit from on a day to day basis? I'm trying to decide if the ability to overclock is more important to me then the extra features the plain old 4770 carries that the K does not.
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June 22, 2014 1:02:05 PM

just a quick note if you upgrade to the 4770 you will need a new MOBO as it is a 1150 socket and your 920 is a 1366 socket.
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June 23, 2014 11:52:12 AM

W00dmann said:
Thanks guys, follow up question: I understand the 4770 K can overclock which is an advantage, but on the other hand, the 4770 has support for transactional memory, virtualization, and I think a few other things too. are any of the extra features in the 4770 things I may use and benefit from on a day to day basis? I'm trying to decide if the ability to overclock is more important to me then the extra features the plain old 4770 carries that the K does not.


It's a good question and it depends on for what will you be using you're PC, in most cases 4770K is the one to go with when asking for a better day to day performance. There are 2 extra instruction sets on 4770, the first is virtualization technology for directed I/O or VT-D, it is basically intel's technology designed to help virtual machines run better, any stronger computer can run a virtual machine or better said could become a virtual machine. Installing two or more operating systems on 1 PC using virtual machine software makes you run a virtual machine. That means that when you turn on you're PC there will be 2 or more OS running at the same time sharing CPU, RAM and everything else in you're computer case. That will slow down you're computer but some people need that for running different app on different OS-s at the same time.



VT-D helps you run virtual machine better but that doesn't mean that you can't run one without this. Not all MB support this and here's a screenshot of the ones which do.



Simply said if you didn't knew about this before you don't need it. ;) 

The next feature is TSX or transactional synchronization extensions which is even harder to explain. Unless you are a programmer you really won't need it. You won't see any gaming or any other day to day action performance upgrade.

There is however one more feature and it has to do with security, 4770 supports intel's trusted execution technology, again you probably won't need this unless you are under constant attack by hackers. So all 3 of these features really aren't that important to an average user. My recommendation is to buy the K version.
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