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Sudden speed drop in videos/livestreams/game-latency

Last response: in Networking
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June 22, 2014 5:51:23 AM

Hi all,
I've had an extremely antagonizing problem with internet for almost 2 weeks now. So what happened is 2 weeks ago (obviously) my internet suddenly could not load youtube videos without chopping and I literally have to wait for the loading to get ahead of me, where as I usually can load something fully soon as I hit the play button. Also I love watching live-streams and that too pretty much doesn't load full stop. I checked my internet provider's website to see if they had any problems, my IP is iinet by the way. So on my IP's website it showed that in my area of WA there was a major scaled problem (5000+ customers affected). So I clearly thought this is why, about 8 days later when they said on their website it was scheduled to fix (20th of June, 2014) its still not working! So before I came here I phoned up iinet, the woman made me download a file and do a speedtest, everything was satisfactory, and in-fact better than what she expected for our package (ADSL 1 Turbo, we can't get ADSL 2 in the hills here). So she said to me it is not a problem with my speeds and my internet usage is only 8gb of 150gb used. Oh and not to mention even facebook videos are loading like rubbish and my game latency in specifically World of Warcraft (an extremely stable game) also spikes! And by the way when I say videos and live-streams are loading slow, I mean on potato quality as well.
SO, things I've done trying to fix this;
Cried (mentally :p )
Delete all temporary internet files, cache, cookies and history
Rang my IP as I've said
Reset my modem
Tried going on these websites/games at times it wouldn't be busy (no difference)
And now I'm completely out of clues in which this could be, I know for sure it isn't my computers physical hardware or software, It's a custom built gaming pc I made just over a year old now with quite good hardware and my software is always up-to-date because I keep on top of it :) .

So now my only chance is seeking help by much more technological minded people here, hope someone could have an idea what this could be!
June 22, 2014 6:39:51 AM

If you ran a speed test to a server hosted by the ISP and it worked fine then the issue may be between your ISP and another ISP or between 2 completely unrelated ISP. If there is a overload condition in the location where ISP link together there is not a lot you can do about it. If as you say something happened that affected a lot of people it could be this. I have seen undersea fiber get cut and all the ISP move to a backup and overload things. Things like undersea cable takes many months to get repaired.

So you can likely find out where the issue is but that does not mean it can be fixed if it is too far away from your house.

There are tools that will do this but you will understand it better if you do it manually.

First run traceroute to a couple of sites that you have trouble with. The first hops in all these traces will be the same likely. You might be able to detect the problem with just trace but it is too short a test. What you want to do is open a bunch of cmd prompts and run a continuous ping to a number of the address you see in the trace. The first 3 or 4 especially you want to look at. What you are looking for are large swings in the numbers or packet loss which is even worse. You may also see everything stable but a huge increase in the latency at one point. This could be due to a running on a backup network.

The first address in the trace is your router so if you see a issue their you know it is your equipment....don't even think to try this test on wireless since you always will see errors.
The second address is generally the first router in the ISP network that you connect to. Errors at this point represent a issue with the wires between you and the ISP.
The third and beyond are hard to guess. You can look up who owns each IP in ARIN or RIPE. You will likely see a few more routers in your ISP network and then connections to other ISP.

Only the first couple hops can anything be fixed...if there is a break in a undersea cable do you think they really will give you any kind of status just because you are affected.
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June 22, 2014 7:06:58 AM

Thanks for the reply bill001g, will check this out what you said, hopefully if this problem isn't fixable by me it can be fixed soon! :/ 
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June 22, 2014 7:22:42 AM

@Bill001g, i did a traceroute to twitch.tv and the ms was extremely high on 4. and 6. (command prompt traceroute) 7+ all timed out,
Traceroute to youtube- 1-5 ranged from 1-23 ms
Traceroute to facebook- 1-3 1-21 ms, 4-10 all over 330ms except 5. 12-13 timed out, 14- 307 ms, will check this thread tomorrow :) 
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June 22, 2014 7:23:57 AM

bill001g said:
If you ran a speed test to a server hosted by the ISP and it worked fine then the issue may be between your ISP and another ISP or between 2 completely unrelated ISP. If there is a overload condition in the location where ISP link together there is not a lot you can do about it. If as you say something happened that affected a lot of people it could be this. I have seen undersea fiber get cut and all the ISP move to a backup and overload things. Things like undersea cable takes many months to get repaired.

So you can likely find out where the issue is but that does not mean it can be fixed if it is too far away from your house.

There are tools that will do this but you will understand it better if you do it manually.

First run traceroute to a couple of sites that you have trouble with. The first hops in all these traces will be the same likely. You might be able to detect the problem with just trace but it is too short a test. What you want to do is open a bunch of cmd prompts and run a continuous ping to a number of the address you see in the trace. The first 3 or 4 especially you want to look at. What you are looking for are large swings in the numbers or packet loss which is even worse. You may also see everything stable but a huge increase in the latency at one point. This could be due to a running on a backup network.

The first address in the trace is your router so if you see a issue their you know it is your equipment....don't even think to try this test on wireless since you always will see errors.
The second address is generally the first router in the ISP network that you connect to. Errors at this point represent a issue with the wires between you and the ISP.
The third and beyond are hard to guess. You can look up who owns each IP in ARIN or RIPE. You will likely see a few more routers in your ISP network and then connections to other ISP.

Only the first couple hops can anything be fixed...if there is a break in a undersea cable do you think they really will give you any kind of status just because you are affected.

Hi sorry i forgot to re-message u with the answer thing, well i posted some results from my traceroute on my command prompt
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Best solution

June 22, 2014 8:32:04 AM

300ms if you are going to the USA from Australia would be a little high but not way out of the ordinary. traceroute and ping are only somewhat accurate tools. Firewalls and routers many times will drop the packets even though there is nothing wrong with the connection. If it always drops them then it is ok it just means they don't wish to talk to you.

What you need to do is look up and see who own the last IP that is good and who owns the ip that is bad. Many times you can tell by the names in the trace route what country/city they are in. Since it is more than 4 or 5 hops from your house this implies there is a issue between ISP. Lets say just as a made up example IINET buy national service from say telsta who connects to say level 3 to carry the data to the USA. You might be able to pin point the errors as happening between say telsta and level3. Maybe you could search for information about failures between them. If you could talk to a high level person at your ISP maybe they have information but it is highly unlikely you would get past the low level techs at a ISP who think all problems are resolved by rebooting the router. It not like you could call level3 or telsta since you have no business relationship with them and you will never get past their tech support.

From the names of the ip in the DNS and from looking up the ip blocks in RIPE or ARIN or the other sites you can get a good idea who owns each router.

Still if the trace it good for the first 4 or 5 hops then you are basically out of luck. The agreement between you and your ISP has been meet they provide the service at the rates to their network. They make no promise that you can actually go anyplace useful since it is out of their control.

This tends to be why when you set up business internet connections you pay lots more to use the larger ISP that have more high speed redundancy in their network. It also allows you to complain and get results when they own all the equipment in the path and can't blame it on another company.
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