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My first desktop build for 3d modeling/rendering under $1300

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June 25, 2014 4:07:49 PM

I don't play games, but use photoshop, sketchup, 3ds max, maya, revit... etc.

I thought that I would build one similar to a gaming pc.

This is what I've got so far

http://pcpartpicker.com/user/yubii58/saved/xFQG3C

I need your opinion and suggestion.
June 25, 2014 4:30:47 PM

id get the i7-4790K CPU. 30$ more but has 500mhz increase than 4770k which will make a difference in rendering
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a b à CPUs
June 25, 2014 4:31:47 PM

Why would you build something similar to a gaming PC? Professional video cards have features that can be exploited by Photoshop. Many rendering tools (and Photoshop) can multitask really well and they all can exploit lots of storage.

To be honest, I don't advise building one now, by September, I expect Intel to have refreshed their professional line of processors. Alternatively, you can go with one of the more recent Xeon processors - there's a reason Apple is using them in the Mac Pro desktop.

However, if you have to build soon, then I'd start around this type of configuration: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/8Zvxbv

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i7-4820K 3.7GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.98 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Intel BXRTS2011AC CPU Cooler ($21.55 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme4 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($162.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($134.99 @ Best Buy)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: ATI FirePro V4900 1GB Video Card ($146.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($88.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 Pro (OEM) (64-bit) ($129.98 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1375.42
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

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a c 737 à CPUs
June 25, 2014 4:32:47 PM

If those programs take advantage of GPU well, I would consider this, as it is a faster GPU.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z97X-SLI ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($118.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Kingston Fury Red Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($72.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial MX100 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($109.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: XFX Radeon R9 290 4GB Black Edition Double Dissipation Video Card ($391.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair SPEC-01 RED ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.73 @ Mwave)
Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 850W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Other: Xeon 1231v3 ($274.71)
Total: $1238.38
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
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a c 737 à CPUs
June 25, 2014 4:34:00 PM

Karsten75 said:
Why would you build something similar to a gaming PC? Professional video cards have features that can be exploited by Photoshop. Many rendering tools (and Photoshop) can multitask really well and they all can exploit lots of storage.

To be honest, I don't advise building one now, by September, I expect Intel to have refreshed their professional line of processors. Alternatively, you can go with one of the more recent Xeon processors - there's a reason Apple is using them in the Mac Pro desktop.

However, if you have to build soon, then I'd start around this type of configuration: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/8Zvxbv

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i7-4820K 3.7GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.98 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Intel BXRTS2011AC CPU Cooler ($21.55 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme4 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($162.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($134.99 @ Best Buy)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: ATI FirePro V4900 1GB Video Card ($146.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($88.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 Pro (OEM) (64-bit) ($129.98 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1375.42
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available



There is virtually no difference between desktop and workstation cards from AMD. AMD doesn't cripple the compute capabilities of their desktop line like Nvidia does.
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a b à CPUs
June 25, 2014 4:43:11 PM

logainofhades said:

There is virtually no difference between desktop and workstation cards from AMD. AMD doesn't cripple the compute capabilities of their desktop line like Nvidia does.


It's not so much that they cripple the cards themselves, it has more to do with the drivers. And I agree, the cost of professional graphics cards are frighteningly expensive compared to gaming cards.

However: http://www.pcper.com/news/General-Tech/Some-Strong-AMD-...

“There is really not much difference between the professional GPUs and the gaming GPUs, Except the drivers, and getting professional level drivers working, and certified to work with the professional graphics software, and the graphics industry’s certification associations, can cost damn near what it cost, to develop the GPU hardware!”

“The drivers that come with professional level GPUs have to continually to be updated, lest the device manufacturer will lose certification and sales. Gaming drivers are tuned to produce images in rapid succession, at the cost of a few artifacts and other imperfections, that really can not be noticed at the high frame rates of games. Professional graphics GPU drivers, are tuned to produce single images that have, if at all possible, no artifacts at all! It is not fun to come back to a 12 hour render and find a rendered Image useless, because it has artifacts, that can not be fixed in less than 12 hours, and the render has to be ready by trade show opening, or show time, and enlarged to 20 by 40 feet!”

“So can it play Crysis, who cares, can it render perfectly and not lose a contract or your job? That is a much better question. The money is in the drivers, and that is why those graphics pros have to pay.”

This video shows the difference between rendering with Radeon and rendering with Firepro:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xEbAaciPGoc

Also, my suggestion of using a "pro" card usually serve to winnow the serious from the rest. :) 

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June 25, 2014 6:27:10 PM

thank you guys!
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!