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How to set up a wired LAN connection between my laptop and PC

Last response: in Networking
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June 26, 2014 10:20:35 AM

I'm not really an expert in networking but it just happens I have a laptop and PC in close proximity along with a long Ethernet wire.

Both my PC and laptop can access the Internet w/o any wire connection (my PC uses D-link USB dongle and my laptop utilizes Intel's Centrino).

I already setup a wireless network. Got them to join under the same work-group as well as under the same home-group. However, there always seem to be a wireless communication problem between my PC and laptop due to inconsistency.

I believe that this long Ethernet wire will keep the communication consistent.

So I'm wondering by the time I've plugged in my Ethernet wire between the two machines have I already accomplished the first step towards a wired LAN connection?

What further steps must I take in order to fully establish a wired LAN connection.

If this helps, my laptop is running the regular Windows 8 edition and my PC runs Windows 7 Ultimate Edition.

Let me know what steps I should take and what advantages I could utilize to optimize the wired LAN experience.

June 26, 2014 10:37:45 AM

If you are connecting two PC's or two laptops or a PC to a laptop and you are not using a router, hub or switch in between them... you must use what is called a cross-over cable which is different from a standard CAT 5 cable. You can buy them or if you have the tools, you could alter your current cable. You can google image a cross-over cable to see how the twisted wiring pairs are different in a cross-over cable.
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a b * Windows 8
a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
June 26, 2014 10:38:28 AM

If your wireless networking is properly set up and configured, there would be no problems between your two computers seeing one another over the wireless network. Sounds like a configuration problem.
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June 26, 2014 10:39:05 AM

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Best solution

a b $ Windows 7
June 26, 2014 10:40:27 AM
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a b * Windows 8
a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
June 26, 2014 11:26:44 AM

You may not need a crossover cable - it depends on your Ethernet cards. Gigabit Ethernet was created with a widely used option called Auto-MDIX (automatic medium-dependent interface crossover). This technology detects whether you need a crossover cable or a straight-through cable, and it automatically configures the network interface card accordingly.
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June 26, 2014 11:42:20 AM

ss202sl said:
You may not need a crossover cable - it depends on your Ethernet cards. Gigabit Ethernet was created with a widely used option called Auto-MDIX (automatic medium-dependent interface crossover). This technology detects whether you need a crossover cable or a straight-through cable, and it automatically configures the network interface card accordingly.
Not sure if this helps but for my PC I have an NVIDIA nForce 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet which is also called Nvidia nForce Networking Controller and my laptop utilizes Qualcomm Atheros AR81715 PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet Controller (NDIS 6.30). Will this be enough info to tell if I need cross-cable?

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a b * Windows 8
a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
June 26, 2014 11:53:39 AM

You can purchase crimping tools and cable ends if you need, and make a crossover cable yourself, if it really came down to it.

The easiest way to find out would be to plug your cable ends into both machines and see if the networking icon on-screen says you are connected or not. You can also watch the lights on your network connector as you plug it in. One light should come on to show a connection, the other should blink to show activity. You aren't risking damage to the network cards if they are not Auto-MDIX, so plugging it in to test it is going to be pretty harmless.
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a b * Windows 8
a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
June 26, 2014 12:28:27 PM

franman said:
I'm not really an expert in networking but it just happens I have a laptop and PC in close proximity along with a long Ethernet wire.

Both my PC and laptop can access the Internet w/o any wire connection (my PC uses D-link USB dongle and my laptop utilizes Intel's Centrino).

I already setup a wireless network. Got them to join under the same work-group as well as under the same home-group. However, there always seem to be a wireless communication problem between my PC and laptop due to inconsistency.

I believe that this long Ethernet wire will keep the communication consistent.

So I'm wondering by the time I've plugged in my Ethernet wire between the two machines have I already accomplished the first step towards a wired LAN connection?

What further steps must I take in order to fully establish a wired LAN connection.

If this helps, my laptop is running the regular Windows 8 edition and my PC runs Windows 7 Ultimate Edition.

Let me know what steps I should take and what advantages I could utilize to optimize the wired LAN experience.



NO, you can't just plug in ONE END to Laptop, other to DESKTOP and not only 'see each other' but also get on the Internet NOR see any other computers.

That your wireless is having issues is the problem, also depends HOW MANY devices (Xboxes, PS3s, iPhones, Tablets, whatever) are ALSO connecting to this Wireless and Wired setup. Depending how many devices AND the type of Wireless Router this is, could be any number of other issues.

That your totally lost on all this, I wouldn't try overflowing you with techno gobbledegoop to confuse you, I would RECOMMEND have like Geek Squad, a IT Friend or maybe if a local Ma/Pa IT company makes home visits, to come to your location and address the issues.

Of the top of my head, the most common causes are; Malware, Viruses, Systems not updated, interference with a neighbor's wifi, configuration issues, old equipment never replaced, too many devices, physical barriers to the signal (oh you mean my cement wall is why the signal is so low on my desktop?), etc. As you can see there is MANY MANY MANY ways we can look at this and never be right, it takes alot of work to 'work through the problem' and get to the core issue, to then apply a solution.
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