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Ok, here is my final build... Finally. I'm ready to order it, I'd just like some feedback if possible.

http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/p/kR73mG

So, assuming that link worked, that is the build.

I'm using Newegg.ca for everything, I'm very new to this and would prefer to deal with one re-seller.

I went with the Z97 because it was on sale and onle $30 more than the H97 I originally planned on going with, so someday I can SLI or overclock if I decide I want to.

I went with 16GB of RAM, because it may become relevant for gaming someday and RAM prices seem to be rising all the time.

I chose the i5 4690 because I won't be OCing, and it seems to be very good, and less expensive than the Xeon.

The GPU was on sale and came highly reviewed.

The HDD is simple and cheap, I don't need much more than that lmao. I won't be using an SSD since it's an additional cost I threw into RAM or something.

The monitor is a decent 1080p, if I understand, and can downsize it 720p if necessary, which is nice.

The case is a bit pricier than I originally intended, but has lots of fans and tons of excellent reviews.

The power supply was highly recommended by some and seems very good, plus it has 10 year warranty... Seems pretty awesome.

I just threw the keyboard in there to get a better idea of costs, I dunno what peripherals I'll use.

I'm uncertain whether to go with Windows 7 or Windows 8.1. I'm leaning towards Win7 because I'm familiar with it.

I'll be pretty much using this build for gaming, not much else that's intensive. No video editing or coding or anything like that.

*UPDATE*

Am I missing anything at all? I do have a different aftermarket cooler because the Vortex wasn't available. The 212 EVO weighs too much for my motherboard, I don't know if the 450g max weight is legit, on Gigabyte's website, but I figured I'd respect it and find a lighter cooler. Anyways, I'm only getting one to be on the safe side for cooling the CPU.

Thank you for your time :).
196 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about final build finally ready order feedback
  1. The 212 eVO is fine for your board. BUT, an aftermarket cooler and an overclocking motherboard are pointless for a non- overclocking CPU.

    I would get low profile RAM and only 8gb of it. DDR4 rAM will be out WAY before games actually benefit from more than 8gb RAM. Save a bit on the case, get an h97 motherboard, and get an XFX550w PSU.

    Use the saved money to get a better GPU.
  2. MrCanEHdian said:
    http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/p/kR73mG

    So, assuming that link worked, that is the build.

    I'm using Newegg.ca for everything, I'm very new to this and would prefer to deal with one re-seller.

    I went with the Z97 because it was on sale and onle $30 more than the H97 I originally planned on going with, so someday I can SLI or overclock if I decide I want to.

    I went with 16GB of RAM, because it may become relevant for gaming someday and RAM prices seem to be rising all the time.

    I chose the i5 4690 because I won't be OCing, and it seems to be very good, and less expensive than the Xeon.

    The GPU was on sale and came highly reviewed.

    The HDD is simple and cheap, I don't need much more than that lmao. I won't be using an SSD since it's an additional cost I threw into RAM or something.

    The monitor is a decent 1080p, if I understand, and can downsize it 720p if necessary, which is nice.

    The case is a bit pricier than I originally intended, but has lots of fans and tons of excellent reviews.

    The power supply was highly recommended by some and seems very good, plus it has 10 year warranty... Seems pretty awesome.

    I just threw the keyboard in there to get a better idea of costs, I dunno what peripherals I'll use.

    I'm uncertain whether to go with Windows 7 or Windows 8.1. I'm leaning towards Win7 because I'm familiar with it.

    I'll be pretty much using this build for gaming, not much else that's intensive. No video editing or coding or anything like that.

    *UPDATE*

    Am I missing anything at all? I do have a different aftermarket cooler because the Vortex wasn't available. The 212 EVO weighs too much for my motherboard, I don't know if the 450g max weight is legit, on Gigabyte's website, but I figured I'd respect it and find a lighter cooler. Anyways, I'm only getting one to be on the safe side for cooling the CPU.

    Thank you for your time :).


    don't get 16gb ram it's pointless, I understand you wanted to future proof but put that money into a gtx 770 or R9 280x. Also that keyboard is good for the price I have it and it's nice to type on and the LED's arn't bad ether.
  3. 8G is all you need for a gaming build. drop it to 8 and maybe bump up to a 770 or a 280x. Other than that looks good!
  4. tiny voices said:
    The 212 eVO is fine for your board. BUT, an aftermarket cooler and an overclocking motherboard are pointless for a non- overclocking CPU.

    I would get low profile RAM and only 8gb of it. DDR4 rAM will be out WAY before games actually benefit from more than 8gb RAM. Save a bit on the case, get an h97 motherboard, and get an XFX550w PSU.

    Use the saved money to get a better GPU.


    Well, the reason I was hoping to go with the Z97 is because it's only $30 more. I figured $30 now might be well-worth it down the road if I want to get a better, unlocked CPU and try SLIing. I'm torn between the RAM, some people say 8 won't be enough for long, but 16 does seem like overkill. So, the case won't have any airflow benefits or anything?
  5. Best answer
    Just get 8gb RAM. Simple as that. For gaming 16gb adds no gains and it will not for a LONG time. Most games still use 3gb or less.

    You would be WAY better off saving the money and putting it towards a better GPU. A gtx770 is a HUGE improvement over a gtx760 and is attainable on your budget easily.

    You have no need for a case with "superior air flow" You do not have a 'HOT' GPU and you will not be overclocking the CPU.
  6. Gracodana said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/p/kR73mG

    So, assuming that link worked, that is the build.

    I'm using Newegg.ca for everything, I'm very new to this and would prefer to deal with one re-seller.

    I went with the Z97 because it was on sale and onle $30 more than the H97 I originally planned on going with, so someday I can SLI or overclock if I decide I want to.

    I went with 16GB of RAM, because it may become relevant for gaming someday and RAM prices seem to be rising all the time.

    I chose the i5 4690 because I won't be OCing, and it seems to be very good, and less expensive than the Xeon.

    The GPU was on sale and came highly reviewed.

    The HDD is simple and cheap, I don't need much more than that lmao. I won't be using an SSD since it's an additional cost I threw into RAM or something.

    The monitor is a decent 1080p, if I understand, and can downsize it 720p if necessary, which is nice.

    The case is a bit pricier than I originally intended, but has lots of fans and tons of excellent reviews.

    The power supply was highly recommended by some and seems very good, plus it has 10 year warranty... Seems pretty awesome.

    I just threw the keyboard in there to get a better idea of costs, I dunno what peripherals I'll use.

    I'm uncertain whether to go with Windows 7 or Windows 8.1. I'm leaning towards Win7 because I'm familiar with it.

    I'll be pretty much using this build for gaming, not much else that's intensive. No video editing or coding or anything like that.

    *UPDATE*

    Am I missing anything at all? I do have a different aftermarket cooler because the Vortex wasn't available. The 212 EVO weighs too much for my motherboard, I don't know if the 450g max weight is legit, on Gigabyte's website, but I figured I'd respect it and find a lighter cooler. Anyways, I'm only getting one to be on the safe side for cooling the CPU.

    Thank you for your time :).


    don't get 16gb ram it's pointless, I understand you wanted to future proof but put that money into a gtx 770 or R9 280x. Also that keyboard is good for the price I have it and it's nice to type on and the LED's arn't bad ether.


    So, 8 will be enough for a while? I was going for 16, because Planetary Annihilation recommends 8GB, so I figured it wouldn't be long until games required more than 8GB. Honestly, by taking out the 16GB for 8GB, I'll likely just save the money. I'm sort of going over-budget. Although I don't have a concrete budget, after taxes it's coming to $1,691, which is somewhat high.

    So you like the keyboard and the mouse? Some reviews said the mouse sucks, but it can't be as bad as my $12 optical mouse.
  7. With a gtx760, more RAM will not give any improvements, even in games that can use it, because the GPU will be the weak point LONG before the RAM. IF you had a 780ti, it might be a different story.
  8. The i5 4670k is unlocked and is only 25$ more if you want to overclock without having to upgrade later. Just a suggestion!
  9. http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/p/w4rjNG Heres the link with the K processor and lowered ram and upgraded video. Saves ya 40 bucks too! If you go the OC route upgrade to the H60 corsair cooler. Works great!
  10. tiny voices said:
    With a gtx760, more RAM will not give any improvements, even in games that can use it, because the GPU will be the weak point LONG before the RAM. IF you had a 780ti, it might be a different story.


    Well in that case xD, I ended up taking it out of the build. I am pretty set on the GTX 760 though, initially I was looking at the 750ti, but the 760 is like a quantum leap in value, the 770 is $100 more for a bit better performance and the 780 is too pricey for me.
  11. Gorgonzer said:
    http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/p/w4rjNG Heres the link with the K processor and lowered ram and upgraded video. Saves ya 40 bucks too! If you go the OC route upgrade to the H60 corsair cooler. Works great!


    The reason I was interested in the i5 4690 was because I was under the impression that it ran cooler... Is that not the case? I'm doubting I'll OC for a while, so I'd upgrade the cooler down the road, when I start OCing. Honestly, I doubt I'd OC for a year or two if I do it.

    Although I'm not against AMD, the reviews are always poor on Newegg.ca and don't AMD GPUs have heat issues?
  12. Here's an awesome gaming build. First, there's an option on the right side of pcpartpicker when you're picking a part to select which merchants you want to show items/prices from. Once you pick the options it sticks for everything else.

    I went with the i5 4590 because it's exactly the same as the 4690 except 0.2GHz slower and saves like $40. For gaming, you more want to focus on the graphics card, and everything you save on other parts can be used on that awesome 780.
    The psu you picked was way overkill. This is probably closer to the lower limit, wattage-wise, of what you should get due to the 780, but will still be fine, and again saves another $40.
    You said you weren't going to overclock, but would think about doing it in the future. You'll notice only a few more frames per second increase overclocking, and need to spend money on a k version cpu, a cpu cooler, and a z version motherboard.
    Also, this case is cheaper and still easy to build with. If you like your case, of course go with that one.
    Along with 'tiny voices' I really think 8GB is plentyyy of ram for gaming. And ram prices are going up? Maybe within the past couple months, but when games need 16GB of ram in a few years, ram will cost way less.
    Finally, the 780 is huge overkill for graphics, but I wanted to keep the total price the same as your previous build. A 770 would save you $170 and is at a way better performance-per-price.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4590 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($217.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Motherboard: ASRock H97 PRO4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($118.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($89.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($74.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 780 3GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($554.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Case: NZXT Source 220 ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($84.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/RSBS DVD/CD Writer ($23.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($104.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Monitor: BenQ GW2255 60Hz 21.5" Monitor ($142.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Keyboard: Perixx PX-1000 Wired Gaming Keyboard
    Total: $1488.80
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
  13. MrCanEHdian said:
    Gorgonzer said:
    http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/p/w4rjNG Heres the link with the K processor and lowered ram and upgraded video. Saves ya 40 bucks too! If you go the OC route upgrade to the H60 corsair cooler. Works great!


    The reason I was interested in the i5 4690 was because I was under the impression that it ran cooler... Is that not the case? I'm doubting I'll OC for a while, so I'd upgrade the cooler down the road, when I start OCing. Honestly, I doubt I'd OC for a year or two if I do it.

    Although I'm not against AMD, the reviews are always poor on Newegg.ca and don't AMD GPUs have heat issues?


    t3nn1spr3p said:
    Here's an awesome gaming build. First, there's an option on the right side of pcpartpicker when you're picking a part to select which merchants you want to show items/prices from. Once you pick the options it sticks for everything else.

    I went with the i5 4590 because it's exactly the same as the 4690 except 0.2GHz slower and saves like $40. For gaming, you more want to focus on the graphics card, and everything you save on other parts can be used on that awesome 780.
    The psu you picked was way overkill. This is probably closer to the lower limit, wattage-wise, of what you should get due to the 780, but will still be fine, and again saves another $40.
    You said you weren't going to overclock, but would think about doing it in the future. You'll notice only a few more frames per second increase overclocking, and need to spend money on a k version cpu, a cpu cooler, and a z version motherboard.
    Also, this case is cheaper and still easy to build with. If you like your case, of course go with that one.
    Along with 'tiny voices' I really think 8GB is plentyyy of ram for gaming. And ram prices are going up? Maybe within the past couple months, but when games need 16GB of ram in a few years, ram will cost way less.
    Finally, the 780 is huge overkill for graphics, but I wanted to keep the total price the same as your previous build. A 770 would save you $170 and is at a way better performance-per-price.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4590 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($217.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Motherboard: ASRock H97 PRO4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($118.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($89.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($74.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 780 3GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($554.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Case: NZXT Source 220 ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($84.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/RSBS DVD/CD Writer ($23.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($104.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Monitor: BenQ GW2255 60Hz 21.5" Monitor ($142.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Keyboard: Perixx PX-1000 Wired Gaming Keyboard
    Total: $1488.80
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available


    I would do this. Is is a GREAT build. It will blow OPs original build out of the water when it comes to gaming.
  14. If you're still set on getting a 760, don't go with the one you chose. It may be on sale, but it only costs more originally because it's smaller and supposed to fit in an ITX case.

    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 760 2GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($284.98 @ Newegg Canada)

    This one is awesome. Has way more reviews, cheaper, better heatsink, and you're not looking to overclock your gpu, so you don't need one of the higher-end 760's.
  15. I agree with t3, if you can spare the xtra 50 buck go with his build.
  16. t3nn1spr3p said:
    Here's an awesome gaming build. First, there's an option on the right side of pcpartpicker when you're picking a part to select which merchants you want to show items/prices from. Once you pick the options it sticks for everything else.

    I went with the i5 4590 because it's exactly the same as the 4690 except 0.2GHz slower and saves like $40. For gaming, you more want to focus on the graphics card, and everything you save on other parts can be used on that awesome 780.
    The psu you picked was way overkill. This is probably closer to the lower limit, wattage-wise, of what you should get due to the 780, but will still be fine, and again saves another $40.
    You said you weren't going to overclock, but would think about doing it in the future. You'll notice only a few more frames per second increase overclocking, and need to spend money on a k version cpu, a cpu cooler, and a z version motherboard.
    Also, this case is cheaper and still easy to build with. If you like your case, of course go with that one.
    Along with 'tiny voices' I really think 8GB is plentyyy of ram for gaming. And ram prices are going up? Maybe within the past couple months, but when games need 16GB of ram in a few years, ram will cost way less.
    Finally, the 780 is huge overkill for graphics, but I wanted to keep the total price the same as your previous build. A 770 would save you $170 and is at a way better performance-per-price.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4590 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($217.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Motherboard: ASRock H97 PRO4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($118.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($89.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($74.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 780 3GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($554.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Case: NZXT Source 220 ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($84.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/RSBS DVD/CD Writer ($23.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($104.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Monitor: BenQ GW2255 60Hz 21.5" Monitor ($142.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Keyboard: Perixx PX-1000 Wired Gaming Keyboard
    Total: $1488.80
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available


    Damn that is one hell of a build... I didn't think one could fit a 780 into a build of that price, in Canadian dollars no less. I'm going to have to stop and think a lot now, that 780 is a beauty, even if it's overkill for 1080p. I would honestly probably go with the EVGA G2 PSU and simply pay the extra premium on it, because it's supposed to be of a high quality, which is crucial for me for a PSU, I want and need something ultra reliable I guess.

    So Z97s advantages are literally overclocking and sometimes SLI? I keep telling myself there's more to it, but if there isn't, then H97 is definitely the way to go for me.

    I'm cool with the case, the most important things are good airflow, and beginner friendliness. I'd like a filter if possible, for dust. Still... That 780, wow.

    Thank you so much!
  17. t3nn1spr3p said:
    If you're still set on getting a 760, don't go with the one you chose. It may be on sale, but it only costs more originally because it's smaller and supposed to fit in an ITX case.

    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 760 2GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($284.98 @ Newegg Canada)

    This one is awesome. Has way more reviews, cheaper, better heatsink, and you're not looking to overclock your gpu, so you don't need one of the higher-end 760's.


    So the one I threw in was kinda crappy? Or just over-doing it? I'll go with that one then, as long as it does what it's meant to... That is, be the entry level to mainstream gaming. A good heatsink is really great too, very important to me.

    Thank you!
  18. tiny voices said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    Gorgonzer said:
    http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/p/w4rjNG Heres the link with the K processor and lowered ram and upgraded video. Saves ya 40 bucks too! If you go the OC route upgrade to the H60 corsair cooler. Works great!


    The reason I was interested in the i5 4690 was because I was under the impression that it ran cooler... Is that not the case? I'm doubting I'll OC for a while, so I'd upgrade the cooler down the road, when I start OCing. Honestly, I doubt I'd OC for a year or two if I do it.

    Although I'm not against AMD, the reviews are always poor on Newegg.ca and don't AMD GPUs have heat issues?


    t3nn1spr3p said:
    Here's an awesome gaming build. First, there's an option on the right side of pcpartpicker when you're picking a part to select which merchants you want to show items/prices from. Once you pick the options it sticks for everything else.

    I went with the i5 4590 because it's exactly the same as the 4690 except 0.2GHz slower and saves like $40. For gaming, you more want to focus on the graphics card, and everything you save on other parts can be used on that awesome 780.
    The psu you picked was way overkill. This is probably closer to the lower limit, wattage-wise, of what you should get due to the 780, but will still be fine, and again saves another $40.
    You said you weren't going to overclock, but would think about doing it in the future. You'll notice only a few more frames per second increase overclocking, and need to spend money on a k version cpu, a cpu cooler, and a z version motherboard.
    Also, this case is cheaper and still easy to build with. If you like your case, of course go with that one.
    Along with 'tiny voices' I really think 8GB is plentyyy of ram for gaming. And ram prices are going up? Maybe within the past couple months, but when games need 16GB of ram in a few years, ram will cost way less.
    Finally, the 780 is huge overkill for graphics, but I wanted to keep the total price the same as your previous build. A 770 would save you $170 and is at a way better performance-per-price.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4590 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($217.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Motherboard: ASRock H97 PRO4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($118.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($89.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($74.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 780 3GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($554.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Case: NZXT Source 220 ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($84.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/RSBS DVD/CD Writer ($23.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($104.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Monitor: BenQ GW2255 60Hz 21.5" Monitor ($142.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Keyboard: Perixx PX-1000 Wired Gaming Keyboard
    Total: $1488.80
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available


    I would do this. Is is a GREAT build. It will blow OPs original build out of the water when it comes to gaming.


    I like it a lot too, it's amazing. So the H97 will be fine for gaming? I'm inclined to go with the Gigabyte H97 because it seems to be well regarded. Also, I'd likely pay the extra for the original PSU as it's supposed to be very good.

    That 780 is amazing, for the price, wow.
  19. There is ZERO performance difference between motherboards. Only features.

    ALso, that Seasonic is as good or better than the EVGA. Don't forget that gold, silver, bronze ratings have nothing to do with quality. There are AMAZING top of the line PSUs without ratings and then gold and platinum PSUs that will burn down your house.
  20. tiny voices said:
    There is ZERO performance difference between motherboards. Only features.

    ALso, that Seasonic is as good or better than the EVGA. Don't forget that gold, silver, bronze ratings have nothing to do with quality. There are AMAZING top of the line PSUs without ratings and then gold and platinum PSUs that will burn down your house.


    So... Do the EVGA G2 series suck more than the Seasonic?

    So, other than overclocking and SLI, there's no legit reason to choose Z97 over H97?
  21. Correct about the motherboards.

    Neither PSUs suck. Theyare both high quality, but I am saying the Seasonic is just as good or better than the EVGA
  22. tiny voices said:
    Correct about the motherboards.

    Neither PSUs suck. Theyare both high quality, but I am saying the Seasonic is just as good or better than the EVGA


    Wow......... Well, I'd go for a Z97 if a good one was on sale and the price increase was tiny compared to an H97. Having the ability to SLI/Crossfire and/or overclock down the road would be nice for a minor price increase. Otherwise, I guess H97 is the way to go.

    Well, in that case, the gold rating would reduce the amount of heat build up in the system right? Don't the efficiency ratings mean at higher ratings, more AC electricity is successfully converted into DC electricity and therefore, reducing heat due to lost energy?
    The PSU you mentioned is significiantly cheaper.... Is it really that good? I was always under the impression that a PSU of less than $100 was going to be cheap and poorly made, I'm guessing that is incorrect in some cases.

    I'd be down to go for the PSU you mentioned if I also got an H97, but if I got a Z97 that was on sale, I'd go for the 750w PSU for future SLI or overclocking, just to be on the safe side.

    Thank you for the valuable help and insight :).
  23. No, the Gold rating also doesn't have anything to do with heat.

    You are 100% incorrect. There are plenty of cheaper PSUs that are amazing quality.

    The Seasonic will be the same OR BETTER quality than that EVGA will be. Simple as that.
  24. MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    Correct about the motherboards.

    Neither PSUs suck. Theyare both high quality, but I am saying the Seasonic is just as good or better than the EVGA


    Wow......... Well, I'd go for a Z97 if a good one was on sale and the price increase was tiny compared to an H97. Having the ability to SLI/Crossfire and/or overclock down the road would be nice for a minor price increase. Otherwise, I guess H97 is the way to go.

    Well, in that case, the gold rating would reduce the amount of heat build up in the system right? Don't the efficiency ratings mean at higher ratings, more AC electricity is successfully converted into DC electricity and therefore, reducing heat due to lost energy?
    The PSU you mentioned is significiantly cheaper.... Is it really that good? I was always under the impression that a PSU of less than $100 was going to be cheap and poorly made, I'm guessing that is incorrect in some cases.

    I'd be down to go for the PSU you mentioned if I also got an H97, but if I got a Z97 that was on sale, I'd go for the 750w PSU for future SLI or overclocking, just to be on the safe side.

    Thank you for the valuable help and insight :).


    To be honest I don't think SLI is that great of a way to go you get much less constant performance and your always better off getting the newer hardware.
  25. Gracodana said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    Correct about the motherboards.

    Neither PSUs suck. Theyare both high quality, but I am saying the Seasonic is just as good or better than the EVGA


    Wow......... Well, I'd go for a Z97 if a good one was on sale and the price increase was tiny compared to an H97. Having the ability to SLI/Crossfire and/or overclock down the road would be nice for a minor price increase. Otherwise, I guess H97 is the way to go.

    Well, in that case, the gold rating would reduce the amount of heat build up in the system right? Don't the efficiency ratings mean at higher ratings, more AC electricity is successfully converted into DC electricity and therefore, reducing heat due to lost energy?
    The PSU you mentioned is significiantly cheaper.... Is it really that good? I was always under the impression that a PSU of less than $100 was going to be cheap and poorly made, I'm guessing that is incorrect in some cases.

    I'd be down to go for the PSU you mentioned if I also got an H97, but if I got a Z97 that was on sale, I'd go for the 750w PSU for future SLI or overclocking, just to be on the safe side.

    Thank you for the valuable help and insight :).


    To be honest I don't think SLI is that great of a way to go you get much less constant performance and your always better off getting the newer hardware.


    I disagree. I recently bought a second 660ti for $150 to pair with the one I have had for a while. I get consistent performance between that of an r9 290 and an r9 290x. For $150 I could not be happier. Adding a second 760 down the road is a great plan.
  26. tiny voices said:
    No, the Gold rating also doesn't have anything to do with heat.

    You are 100% incorrect. There are plenty of cheaper PSUs that are amazing quality.

    The Seasonic will be the same OR BETTER quality than that EVGA will be. Simple as that.


    So the main difference is the SeaSonic has 550w or something around there? And the gold rating is simply for "reducing" your electricity bill? That's lame, the difference would be marginal.
  27. tiny voices said:
    Gracodana said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    Correct about the motherboards.

    Neither PSUs suck. Theyare both high quality, but I am saying the Seasonic is just as good or better than the EVGA


    Wow......... Well, I'd go for a Z97 if a good one was on sale and the price increase was tiny compared to an H97. Having the ability to SLI/Crossfire and/or overclock down the road would be nice for a minor price increase. Otherwise, I guess H97 is the way to go.

    Well, in that case, the gold rating would reduce the amount of heat build up in the system right? Don't the efficiency ratings mean at higher ratings, more AC electricity is successfully converted into DC electricity and therefore, reducing heat due to lost energy?
    The PSU you mentioned is significiantly cheaper.... Is it really that good? I was always under the impression that a PSU of less than $100 was going to be cheap and poorly made, I'm guessing that is incorrect in some cases.

    I'd be down to go for the PSU you mentioned if I also got an H97, but if I got a Z97 that was on sale, I'd go for the 750w PSU for future SLI or overclocking, just to be on the safe side.

    Thank you for the valuable help and insight :).


    To be honest I don't think SLI is that great of a way to go you get much less constant performance and your always better off getting the newer hardware.


    I disagree. I recently bought a second 660ti for $150 to pair with the one I have had for a while. I get consistent performance between that of an r9 290 and an r9 290x. For $150 I could not be happier. Adding a second 760 down the road is a great plan.



    I was thinking that too, it's amazing, instead of rendering your old GPU obselete and spending big bucks on a new one, you can use the old one and get the same type for a lower price than what you bought the first one for, and get some massive performance boosts, that's a hell of an opportunity. The Z97's markup price is pretty worth it for that option down the road. Thanks for all the feedback, from everyone.
  28. MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    No, the Gold rating also doesn't have anything to do with heat.

    You are 100% incorrect. There are plenty of cheaper PSUs that are amazing quality.

    The Seasonic will be the same OR BETTER quality than that EVGA will be. Simple as that.


    So the main difference is the SeaSonic has 550w or something around there? And the gold rating is simply for "reducing" your electricity bill? That's lame, the difference would be marginal.


    Yes, that is correct.
  29. tiny voices said:
    Gracodana said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    Correct about the motherboards.

    Neither PSUs suck. Theyare both high quality, but I am saying the Seasonic is just as good or better than the EVGA


    Wow......... Well, I'd go for a Z97 if a good one was on sale and the price increase was tiny compared to an H97. Having the ability to SLI/Crossfire and/or overclock down the road would be nice for a minor price increase. Otherwise, I guess H97 is the way to go.

    Well, in that case, the gold rating would reduce the amount of heat build up in the system right? Don't the efficiency ratings mean at higher ratings, more AC electricity is successfully converted into DC electricity and therefore, reducing heat due to lost energy?
    The PSU you mentioned is significiantly cheaper.... Is it really that good? I was always under the impression that a PSU of less than $100 was going to be cheap and poorly made, I'm guessing that is incorrect in some cases.

    I'd be down to go for the PSU you mentioned if I also got an H97, but if I got a Z97 that was on sale, I'd go for the 750w PSU for future SLI or overclocking, just to be on the safe side.

    Thank you for the valuable help and insight :).


    To be honest I don't think SLI is that great of a way to go you get much less constant performance and your always better off getting the newer hardware.


    I disagree. I recently bought a second 660ti for $150 to pair with the one I have had for a while. I get consistent performance between that of an r9 290 and an r9 290x. For $150 I could not be happier. Adding a second 760 down the road is a great plan.


    I guess it is a bit down to personal preferance I wouldn't really recommend but you would I guess if you want to do but I think it's better to have newer hardware personally.
  30. Gracodana said:
    tiny voices said:
    Gracodana said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    Correct about the motherboards.

    Neither PSUs suck. Theyare both high quality, but I am saying the Seasonic is just as good or better than the EVGA


    Wow......... Well, I'd go for a Z97 if a good one was on sale and the price increase was tiny compared to an H97. Having the ability to SLI/Crossfire and/or overclock down the road would be nice for a minor price increase. Otherwise, I guess H97 is the way to go.

    Well, in that case, the gold rating would reduce the amount of heat build up in the system right? Don't the efficiency ratings mean at higher ratings, more AC electricity is successfully converted into DC electricity and therefore, reducing heat due to lost energy?
    The PSU you mentioned is significiantly cheaper.... Is it really that good? I was always under the impression that a PSU of less than $100 was going to be cheap and poorly made, I'm guessing that is incorrect in some cases.

    I'd be down to go for the PSU you mentioned if I also got an H97, but if I got a Z97 that was on sale, I'd go for the 750w PSU for future SLI or overclocking, just to be on the safe side.

    Thank you for the valuable help and insight :).


    To be honest I don't think SLI is that great of a way to go you get much less constant performance and your always better off getting the newer hardware.


    I disagree. I recently bought a second 660ti for $150 to pair with the one I have had for a while. I get consistent performance between that of an r9 290 and an r9 290x. For $150 I could not be happier. Adding a second 760 down the road is a great plan.


    I guess it is a bit down to personal preferance I wouldn't really recommend but you would I guess if you want to do but I think it's better to have newer hardware personally.


    This is 100% an opinion.
  31. tiny voices said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    No, the Gold rating also doesn't have anything to do with heat.

    You are 100% incorrect. There are plenty of cheaper PSUs that are amazing quality.

    The Seasonic will be the same OR BETTER quality than that EVGA will be. Simple as that.


    So the main difference is the SeaSonic has 550w or something around there? And the gold rating is simply for "reducing" your electricity bill? That's lame, the difference would be marginal.


    Yes, that is correct.


    That's a lot of money saved for going with the SeaSonic. The money saved on the electricity bill is pretty minor, so the gold rating seems like a marketing gimmick, and the 750w is probably more than I'll ever use.
  32. tiny voices said:
    Gracodana said:
    tiny voices said:
    Gracodana said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    Correct about the motherboards.

    Neither PSUs suck. Theyare both high quality, but I am saying the Seasonic is just as good or better than the EVGA


    Wow......... Well, I'd go for a Z97 if a good one was on sale and the price increase was tiny compared to an H97. Having the ability to SLI/Crossfire and/or overclock down the road would be nice for a minor price increase. Otherwise, I guess H97 is the way to go.

    Well, in that case, the gold rating would reduce the amount of heat build up in the system right? Don't the efficiency ratings mean at higher ratings, more AC electricity is successfully converted into DC electricity and therefore, reducing heat due to lost energy?
    The PSU you mentioned is significiantly cheaper.... Is it really that good? I was always under the impression that a PSU of less than $100 was going to be cheap and poorly made, I'm guessing that is incorrect in some cases.

    I'd be down to go for the PSU you mentioned if I also got an H97, but if I got a Z97 that was on sale, I'd go for the 750w PSU for future SLI or overclocking, just to be on the safe side.

    Thank you for the valuable help and insight :).


    To be honest I don't think SLI is that great of a way to go you get much less constant performance and your always better off getting the newer hardware.


    I disagree. I recently bought a second 660ti for $150 to pair with the one I have had for a while. I get consistent performance between that of an r9 290 and an r9 290x. For $150 I could not be happier. Adding a second 760 down the road is a great plan.


    I guess it is a bit down to personal preferance I wouldn't really recommend but you would I guess if you want to do but I think it's better to have newer hardware personally.


    This is 100% an opinion.


    Is there any objective reason for going with newer hardware as opposed to SLI? Like, does newer hardware get better PhysX or anything?
  33. MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    Gracodana said:
    tiny voices said:
    Gracodana said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    Correct about the motherboards.

    Neither PSUs suck. Theyare both high quality, but I am saying the Seasonic is just as good or better than the EVGA


    Wow......... Well, I'd go for a Z97 if a good one was on sale and the price increase was tiny compared to an H97. Having the ability to SLI/Crossfire and/or overclock down the road would be nice for a minor price increase. Otherwise, I guess H97 is the way to go.

    Well, in that case, the gold rating would reduce the amount of heat build up in the system right? Don't the efficiency ratings mean at higher ratings, more AC electricity is successfully converted into DC electricity and therefore, reducing heat due to lost energy?
    The PSU you mentioned is significiantly cheaper.... Is it really that good? I was always under the impression that a PSU of less than $100 was going to be cheap and poorly made, I'm guessing that is incorrect in some cases.

    I'd be down to go for the PSU you mentioned if I also got an H97, but if I got a Z97 that was on sale, I'd go for the 750w PSU for future SLI or overclocking, just to be on the safe side.

    Thank you for the valuable help and insight :).


    To be honest I don't think SLI is that great of a way to go you get much less constant performance and your always better off getting the newer hardware.


    I disagree. I recently bought a second 660ti for $150 to pair with the one I have had for a while. I get consistent performance between that of an r9 290 and an r9 290x. For $150 I could not be happier. Adding a second 760 down the road is a great plan.


    I guess it is a bit down to personal preferance I wouldn't really recommend but you would I guess if you want to do but I think it's better to have newer hardware personally.


    This is 100% an opinion.


    Is there any objective reason for going with newer hardware as opposed to SLI? Like, does newer hardware get better PhysX or anything?


    just look at the 750 and 650 it will be those sorts of differances, you get more power Efficiency such as the 750/ ti can run off just the PCI. You also do get better techniques like physx as you say.
  34. Gracodana said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    Gracodana said:
    tiny voices said:
    Gracodana said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    Correct about the motherboards.

    Neither PSUs suck. Theyare both high quality, but I am saying the Seasonic is just as good or better than the EVGA


    Wow......... Well, I'd go for a Z97 if a good one was on sale and the price increase was tiny compared to an H97. Having the ability to SLI/Crossfire and/or overclock down the road would be nice for a minor price increase. Otherwise, I guess H97 is the way to go.

    Well, in that case, the gold rating would reduce the amount of heat build up in the system right? Don't the efficiency ratings mean at higher ratings, more AC electricity is successfully converted into DC electricity and therefore, reducing heat due to lost energy?
    The PSU you mentioned is significiantly cheaper.... Is it really that good? I was always under the impression that a PSU of less than $100 was going to be cheap and poorly made, I'm guessing that is incorrect in some cases.

    I'd be down to go for the PSU you mentioned if I also got an H97, but if I got a Z97 that was on sale, I'd go for the 750w PSU for future SLI or overclocking, just to be on the safe side.

    Thank you for the valuable help and insight :).


    To be honest I don't think SLI is that great of a way to go you get much less constant performance and your always better off getting the newer hardware.


    I disagree. I recently bought a second 660ti for $150 to pair with the one I have had for a while. I get consistent performance between that of an r9 290 and an r9 290x. For $150 I could not be happier. Adding a second 760 down the road is a great plan.


    I guess it is a bit down to personal preferance I wouldn't really recommend but you would I guess if you want to do but I think it's better to have newer hardware personally.


    This is 100% an opinion.


    Is there any objective reason for going with newer hardware as opposed to SLI? Like, does newer hardware get better PhysX or anything?


    just look at the 750 and 650 it will be those sorts of differances, you get more power Efficiency such as the 750/ ti can run off just the PCI. You also do get better techniques like physx as you say.


    So there are legitimate reasons, it just comes down to whether you want to spend the big bucks on a new GPU and render your old one obsolete, maybe sell it for a fraction of its original value online.
  35. Selling GPUs 2+ years down the road is never a very good idea. You will likely get 50% for them. It is better to just keep them around. I am a firm believer in buying a second card used for cheap and using SLI/ CF instead of buying a whole new card as long as the pair of cards will be the same/ close in performance.

    For example, I can buy a second 660ti for $160 and have performance between a 290 and a 290x. Why would I buy one of those when I can have the same/ better performance for only $160?

    Everyone who complains about micro-stuttering/ no SLI/CF support is just making excuses. I have used multi GPU setups my whole life (AMD and Nvidia) and I have never run into micro-stuttering or game support issues that have made me wish I went with a single card instead.
  36. tiny voices said:
    Selling GPUs 2+ years down the road is never a very good idea. You will likely get 50% for them. It is better to just keep them around. I am a firm believer in buying a second card used for cheap and using SLI/ CF instead of buying a whole new card as long as the pair of cards will be the same/ close in performance.

    For example, I can buy a second 660ti for $160 and have performance between a 290 and a 290x. Why would I buy one of those when I can have the same/ better performance for only $160?

    Everyone who complains about micro-stuttering/ no SLI/CF support is just making excuses. I have used multi GPU setups my whole life (AMD and Nvidia) and I have never run into micro-stuttering or game support issues that have made me wish I went with a single card instead.


    You would keep the old cards even if you don't use them for anything?

    Ya... Now that SLI works better than it did 7 years ago, SLIing is an awesome opportunity. I'm pretty set on a Z97 just for that capability right now.
    That's good, about the instability issues being mostly nonesense, but if you do experience issues like that, can you turn one GPU off to get rid of that issue?
  37. There is no need to turn anything off. I have never done that in the 6+ years I have had Dual GPU systems. If something does not support SLI, it only uses one card. Simple as that.
  38. tiny voices said:
    There is no need to turn anything off. I have never done that in the 6+ years I have had Dual GPU systems. If something does not support SLI, it only uses one card. Simple as that.


    I'm seriously learning towards the GTX 760 of all now, then, I mean I can buy one and enjoy it until I find I need another one, that is so badass and I see so much value!
    I love that, how SLI doesn't get in the way in any circumstance.
  39. tiny voices said:
    Selling GPUs 2+ years down the road is never a very good idea. You will likely get 50% for them. It is better to just keep them around. I am a firm believer in buying a second card used for cheap and using SLI/ CF instead of buying a whole new card as long as the pair of cards will be the same/ close in performance.

    For example, I can buy a second 660ti for $160 and have performance between a 290 and a 290x. Why would I buy one of those when I can have the same/ better performance for only $160?

    Everyone who complains about micro-stuttering/ no SLI/CF support is just making excuses. I have used multi GPU setups my whole life (AMD and Nvidia) and I have never run into micro-stuttering or game support issues that have made me wish I went with a single card instead.


    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    There is no need to turn anything off. I have never done that in the 6+ years I have had Dual GPU systems. If something does not support SLI, it only uses one card. Simple as that.


    I'm seriously learning towards the GTX 760 of all now, then, I mean I can buy one and enjoy it until I find I need another one, that is so badass and I see so much value!
    I love that, how SLI doesn't get in the way in any circumstance.


    you might think of a 770 because a 760 is good but it is struggling with some games on ultra so the 770 would give you enough horse power to deliver a good framerate at high settings when only using one card in case the game didn't support SLI.
  40. Gracodana said:
    tiny voices said:
    Selling GPUs 2+ years down the road is never a very good idea. You will likely get 50% for them. It is better to just keep them around. I am a firm believer in buying a second card used for cheap and using SLI/ CF instead of buying a whole new card as long as the pair of cards will be the same/ close in performance.

    For example, I can buy a second 660ti for $160 and have performance between a 290 and a 290x. Why would I buy one of those when I can have the same/ better performance for only $160?

    Everyone who complains about micro-stuttering/ no SLI/CF support is just making excuses. I have used multi GPU setups my whole life (AMD and Nvidia) and I have never run into micro-stuttering or game support issues that have made me wish I went with a single card instead.


    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    There is no need to turn anything off. I have never done that in the 6+ years I have had Dual GPU systems. If something does not support SLI, it only uses one card. Simple as that.


    I'm seriously learning towards the GTX 760 of all now, then, I mean I can buy one and enjoy it until I find I need another one, that is so badass and I see so much value!
    I love that, how SLI doesn't get in the way in any circumstance.


    you might think of a 770 because a 760 is good but it is struggling with some games on ultra so the 770 would give you enough horse power to deliver a good framerate at high settings when only using one card in case the game didn't support SLI.


    That is a good point, it is only an extra $100. On the other hand, I could also go with an R9 280, can the R9 280 compete with the GTX 770?
  41. the 280x is what competes with the 770, not the normal 280.
  42. tiny voices said:
    the 280x is what competes with the 770, not the normal 280.


    Hmmm.... Tough calls, does crossfire work as well as SLI? I've heard no, but I don't know if it's true or not.
  43. Honestly, I have never owned a crossfire build, but a close friend has one with two 7950s in it. He seems to love it and doesn't have issues. In the course of history, Crossfire has proven more troublesome than SLI.
  44. tiny voices said:
    Honestly, I have never owned a crossfire build, but a close friend has one with two 7950s in it. He seems to love it and doesn't have issues. In the course of history, Crossfire has proven more troublesome than SLI.


    Yes, I've read about that being the case. It seems AMD cards have more issues than Nvidia cards too. All the Newegg reviews for AMD GPUs are pretty poor, they seem to have a lot of issues.
  45. I disagree with the reviews about the cards as a whole. The are fine cards. I used a 7870 for a long time and it was great. never had a single issue.
  46. tiny voices said:
    I disagree with the reviews about the cards as a whole. The are fine cards. I used a 7870 for a long time and it was great. never had a single issue.


    So take them with a grain of salt? That's good.
  47. MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    I disagree with the reviews about the cards as a whole. The are fine cards. I used a 7870 for a long time and it was great. never had a single issue.


    So take them with a grain of salt? That's good.


    I prefer nvidia cards as a whole but those reviews I would disagree with AMD runs a bit hotter and uses more power but they are still powerful and have support for a lot of games that they run better then nvidia
  48. Gracodana said:
    MrCanEHdian said:
    tiny voices said:
    I disagree with the reviews about the cards as a whole. The are fine cards. I used a 7870 for a long time and it was great. never had a single issue.


    So take them with a grain of salt? That's good.


    I prefer nvidia cards as a whole but those reviews I would disagree with AMD runs a bit hotter and uses more power but they are still powerful and have support for a lot of games that they run better then nvidia


    Yes, the heat is kinda sketchy, can you buy GPU coolers? The extra power is no biggie to me, it barely impacts the electricity bill. So, some games run better on Nvidia and others on AMD? A lot of the R9 series GPUs have complaints of leaking oil and what not, stock fans breaking down, in the Newegg reviews.
  49. Yeah, people like to hate AMD for no reason. I personally like their CPUs and GPUs quite alot.

    Generally people seem to think and say that the 770 blows away the 280x, when in reality they are basically the same. Some games run better on the 770 and others on the 280x.
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