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Is the Thermal compound the reason I have such high temperatures under maximum load?

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  • Computers
  • Thermal Compound
  • CPUs
Last response: in CPUs
June 27, 2014 7:12:29 PM

Hello, I was building a new computer today, the second computer I have built, and I decided that I would use the Corsair H75 to cool my CPU, Intel i7 4790k not overclocked. When I installed it I had the thermal compound making contact with the CPU but I realized that I had to reinstall the back plate. Upon doing this, I had a great deal of trouble removing the Corsair Heatsink/pump. As a result, I ended up smearing the thermal paste across the CPU and then I had to reinstall the Heagtsink/pump to the CPU. My computer works fine now but my idle temperatures are roughly between 35 and 38. When I put my computer under maximum load, using Open Hardware Monitor to monitor the temp and Prime 95, my temperature reached 75 to 78 C when I decided to turn it off. This was only after a minute or two. I am using an Intel I7 4790K and a Corsair H75. Is this normal and should I reapply the thermal compound? Also, does this processor tend to run hotter, I had a 3770k that never reached above 50 C

Thanks for the help

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June 27, 2014 7:48:05 PM

Any time you reinstall a heatsink you should clean and reapply the thermal paste. that being said your temps are perfectly fine. no reason to shut it off... Intel runs hot. 90C plus is the point to worry. they will throttle at 100C.
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a c 1171 à CPUs
June 27, 2014 8:05:56 PM

+1^
It's always best to clean/re-apply after moving the heat sync. By reinstalling the heat sync on the used TIM, you introduce microscopic air bubbles into the TIM. That retards heat transfer. But you may have a mtg issue too. When you remove the heat sync, check to see if the surfaces are mating correctly. The TIM should be evenly distributed. I had an H60 that would not lay against the CPU properly and only pressed half the TIM into a circle. The rest was almost undisturbed.
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June 27, 2014 8:20:25 PM

clutchc said:
+1^
It's always best to clean/re-apply after moving the heat sync. By reinstalling the heat sync on the used TIM, you introduce microscopic air bubbles into the TIM. That retards heat transfer. But you may have a mtg issue too. When you remove the heat sync, check to see if the surfaces are mating correctly. The TIM should be evenly distributed. I had an H60 that would not lay against the CPU properly and only pressed half the TIM into a circle. The rest was almost undisturbed.

Are these temperatures normal under max load and is it worth it to remove my heatsink and reapply thermal paste or can I leave it as is? Thanks for the help.

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June 27, 2014 8:34:10 PM

clutchc said:
75C is about max safe temp for that processor: http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_i7/Intel-Core%20i7-4... (73C actually). Not unsafe but not great for a liq cooler. I wouldn't accept that.

With watercooling, is there any chance that my ambient/room temp is affecting my CPU temp. The ambient/room temp is around 28C (83F)?

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June 28, 2014 12:09:18 AM

Ghost Koi said:
clutchc said:
75C is about max safe temp for that processor: http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_i7/Intel-Core%20i7-4... (73C actually). Not unsafe but not great for a liq cooler. I wouldn't accept that.

With watercooling, is there any chance that my ambient/room temp is affecting my CPU temp. The ambient/room temp is around 28C (83F)?



Possibly yes. 83F is really hot. The air ur PC is taking in isn't that cool. :/ 
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