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27 inch 1080p Monitor vs 23 inch 1080p Monitor? Possible Eye Strain?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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June 29, 2014 5:02:17 PM

I've had a 23 inch monitor for about 2.5 years now, and about 6 months ago I switched over to a 27 inch, with the same resolution, being 1920x1080. I've heard bad things about 1080p on a 27 inch, as the pixels are bigger or something. I have my 23 inch to my right, and I can see the clarity difference very well. The 27 seems to be a bit more "blurry" than the 23, and I had a few questions.

My current monitors:

27 inch: AOC E2752VH (On the left, primary display)
23 inch: HP 2311x (On the right)

1. Is it true that the "bigger" the monitor, the more work you're putting on your GPU? Possibly causing more lag or frame rate lowered?

2. Should I switch back to my old 23 inch or possible try to sell my 27 inch to get a better 23 or 24? I heard apparently that 24 is the best fit for 1080p.

3. Also, it seems that I'm having more eye strain when looking at the 27 rather than the 23. Is this because there is more light being projected at once? This is a problem that bothers me very much. I turn down the brightness all the way down frequently. I hate having eye strain, and I don't want to damage my eyes. I'm not exactly sure, can you really damage your eyes from monitors?

4. One more thing, when I use the 27 inch, I have to go into my "color management" in Windows 8 and change the default profile from 2752H (I have a E2752H monitor) to sRGB IEC61966-2.1, as this is the only way I don't get a yellowish tint in the Windows photo viewer. Is this a problem with my monitor? Photoshop also gives me a warning on start, telling me about the monitor profile or something.

A few pictures of my current setup just to give an idea of what I'm doing right now, I know it's not very good.




Thank you.

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June 29, 2014 5:33:29 PM

The performance of a GPU is the same on any 1080p monitor no matter how big. This is because 1080p refers to the amount of pixels that have to be rendered, in this case it is 1920*1080=2,073,600 pixels. The larger monitor is blurrier because it has the same amount of pixel but has a larger surface area. If you want to get a good monitor with good colors at 23" i would recommend this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I personally own this monitor and it looks great. The reason it is more expensive than other 1080p monitors of the same size is that it is an IPS monitor rather than TN panel. IPS has WAY better viewing angles and WAY better colors.
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June 29, 2014 6:30:06 PM

helper800 said:
The performance of a GPU is the same on any 1080p monitor no matter how big. This is because 1080p refers to the amount of pixels that have to be rendered, in this case it is 1920*1080=2,073,600 pixels. The larger monitor is blurrier because it has the same amount of pixel but has a larger surface area. If you want to get a good monitor with good colors at 23" i would recommend this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I personally own this monitor and it looks great. The reason it is more expensive than other 1080p monitors of the same size is that it is an IPS monitor rather than TN panel. IPS has WAY better viewing angles and WAY better colors.


Thank you for the information! The only thing is, I'm going to be doing a lot of gaming with my next PC build, and 5ms may be too much of a delay, so I may have to find anther. And I never heard of the terms IPS or TN panels, what actually is the main difference between them? I heard you about better viewing angles and better colors, but what is actually different in terms of how it's built? Does IPS have slower timing? (e.g. 5ms vs > 1ms), I may consider buying an IPS next time!
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June 29, 2014 9:37:57 PM

ivideo1011 said:
helper800 said:
The performance of a GPU is the same on any 1080p monitor no matter how big. This is because 1080p refers to the amount of pixels that have to be rendered, in this case it is 1920*1080=2,073,600 pixels. The larger monitor is blurrier because it has the same amount of pixel but has a larger surface area. If you want to get a good monitor with good colors at 23" i would recommend this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I personally own this monitor and it looks great. The reason it is more expensive than other 1080p monitors of the same size is that it is an IPS monitor rather than TN panel. IPS has WAY better viewing angles and WAY better colors.


Thank you for the information! The only thing is, I'm going to be doing a lot of gaming with my next PC build, and 5ms may be too much of a delay, so I may have to find anther. And I never heard of the terms IPS or TN panels, what actually is the main difference between them? I heard you about better viewing angles and better colors, but what is actually different in terms of how it's built? Does IPS have slower timing? (e.g. 5ms vs > 1ms), I may consider buying an IPS next time!


The difference in response time is literally indistinguishable at 5ms or less. As for what IPS is here you go: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPS_panel
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