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Hi is this a good gaming build? I will adding a GPU in the future

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/BCZNgs is this a good build?
OT: What is a good keyboard with quality for 60 dollars or lower? Thanks guys
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More about good gaming build adding gpu future
  1. you will need

    os a dvd rom and gpu like you said
  2. I already got those I dont need one
  3. I've herd some less than favorable things about the Corsair CX series PSUs. Their TX line is much better. You can also look at Antec, FSP, Seasonic, and XFX for good PSUs. Depending on your GPU, 600W may be a bit overkill as well.

    You've got an overclockable CPU and mboard, but no aftermarket CPU cooler which means your OC will be limited by the stock cooler. Personally I think overclocking i5 and i7 chips largely isn't worth it in games because more often than not the GPU is the bottleneck. I'd prefer saving money on the CPU, cooling, and mboard for other components, but that of course is your choice. OCing the CPU makes great sense if you're regularly running CPU intensive tasks like compiling code or transcoding video.
  4. Ahh I was about to get the XFX TS 550 but I heard the cable management was a little tough. Is the Corsair CX 600 series dependable because I dont want it to fry my components. Also I got the CM Evo 212 for my heat sink. I heard Seasonic has really good build quality and its really strong, I might be wrong but yeah. With the i5 I might not do overclocking due to the fact it can fry it and void the warranty and I have never overclocked a CPU before. Im just going to use the turbo boost feature. If I OC in the future how many Ghz do you think I can get up to with the Hyper Evo 212? Thanks.
  5. Also I was about to put an EVGA GTX 770 SC/ACX but my cousin said not to get a GPU yet because Im mainly using this for minor gaming like LOL and Cross Fire. He said technology is advancing so fast that I have to have a 2000 dollar computer minimum.
  6. dreadlyknife said:
    Also I was about to put an EVGA GTX 770 SC/ACX but my cousin said not to get a GPU yet because Im mainly using this for minor gaming like LOL and Cross Fire. He said technology is advancing so fast that I have to have a 2000 dollar computer minimum.


    You will still need a graphics card, and the gtx 770 is a good one. I don't think you will bottlneck either.
  7. He said technology is ending so fast that its going to be bad in 3-4 years.
  8. dreadlyknife said:
    He said technology is ending so fast that its going to be bad in 3-4 years.


    Yeah in 3-4 years... we don't know shit about the how much technology is gonna change. I wouldn't wait just get the gpu and play some games
  9. dreadlyknife said:
    Also I was about to put an EVGA GTX 770 SC/ACX but my cousin said not to get a GPU yet because Im mainly using this for minor gaming like LOL and Cross Fire. He said technology is advancing so fast that I have to have a 2000 dollar computer minimum.

    I don't mean to be rude, but your cousin doesn't know near as much as s/he thinks s/he does. If you plan smart you can easily have a $1000 system last you five years or more with minimal upgrading.

    Four very important questions first:
    1 ) What parts do you need?
    2 ) What is your total budget right now?
    3 ) What games do you play the most or do you plan to play the most?
    4 ) What resolution and detail levels do you want to play at?

    As for #1, we don't need an explicit lists like cables and such, but what main components are you lacking? You say you've got an OS and DVD drive, and you might want a new keyboard. Are you also looking for a new monitor or anything else? Numbers 3 and 4 determine how you want to balance your hardware. I know a lot of people want to play with detail settings completely maxed out, but I'll just say that most modern games look pretty good at med-high settings, and that doesn't require nearly as much money in a GPU.
  10. 1. I need a graphics card, Getting the GTX 800 series. And a good quality keyboard I was looking at the Microsoft x4 gaming Keyboard
    2. 1000 USD
    3. CrossFire Watch Dogs BF4 Crisis
    4 1680x1050
  11. dreadlyknife said:
    1. I need a graphics card, Getting the GTX 800 series. And a good quality keyboard I was looking at the Microsoft x4 gaming Keyboard
    2. 1000 USD
    3. CrossFire Watch Dogs BF4 Crisis
    4 1680x1050


    At that resolutions, a 770 will last you a long time while playing all games on ultra. I also agree with the others who said to switch your PSU to XFX or Seasonic. You have a Western digital blue drive in your build now, i'd switch that to a Black version if I were you. It will give you better performance.
  12. XFX is really expensive I hope the Cx series will have no problem since Corsair is a good brand.
  13. The XFX TS 550W is only about $30 more than that corsair. Since you will be investing around $800 in a pc, I think that $30 extra is very reasonable for ensuring that your entire system doesn't get fried because of a cheap psu.
  14. Seasonic has really strong quality materials Ill be looking at both of em. i saw the XFX FOR 25 DAMN i WAS STUPID NOT To buy that.
  15. Carbide Series® SPEC-01 Red LED Mid-Tower Gaming Case I got that case I hope this thing dont come with 1 rear fan
  16. Corsair doesn't make their own PSUs. They have other OEMs do that. Their CX series is actually made by Channel Well. Their higher end models are made by Seasonic. All XFX PSUs are also made by Seasonic. FSP / Fortron are their own company and they make good PSUs as well.

    Do you have any big desires for this computer other than gaming? Any other tinkering or heavy lifting that will be thrown at it?
  17. I might overclock it a little and my freaking Corsair Spec 01 can not fit the Coolermaster Hyper Evo 212. I will be using it for office use and gaming thats it and I appreciate your help. Ima check stuff out on July 4th and I just order the CX 600 from newegg yesterday. I hope it docent break after 10 months of use or come in DOA. But I certainly still need a good gaming keyboard I was looking at the Microsoft X4 gaming keyboard.
  18. But for now just to sum it up I need to find a new case that under 50 with a side window and a keyboard.
  19. People are giving you good advice but you seem to ignore it, so there's really no point in asking if you dont take them
  20. Im already canceling the Corsair CX 600 and replacing it with the XFX TS 550. So I am listening I am answering all his question I might not understand some stuff because this is my first build.
  21. dreadlyknife said:
    But for now just to sum it up I need to find a new case that under 50 with a side window and a keyboard.


    Case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119256
    or
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146058
  22. Best answer
    dreadlyknife said:
    I might overclock it a little and my freaking Corsair Spec 01 can not fit the Coolermaster Hyper Evo 212. ... But I certainly still need a good gaming keyboard I was looking at the Microsoft X4 gaming keyboard.

    I'll simply reiterate that OCing a current gen i5 mainly for gaming is usually not worth it. More demanding games typically want more graphical horsepower than CPU, so the GPU is the bottleneck. OCing the CPU in those cases won't improve anything because your GPU is holding everything else back. The games where CPU OCing helps are usually things like MMOs, RTS, and MOBAs. An i5 with a mainstream GPU ( say 7770 / 650 Ti ) can usually max those out already ( or close enough, ) so there's usually no need to OC at all.

    That said, I understand that some people just have a desire to tinker and play with their hardware. I get that and won't gainsay you if you just want to fiddle around. Just realize that real-world impacts will probably be a lot lower than you may think.

    So, If I had about $1000 to build a gaming-centric computer right now, I'd start somewhere around here:

    PCPartPicker part list

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4460 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($187.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock H97M PRO4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($84.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.98 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Crucial MX100 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.92 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Asus Radeon R9 280X 3GB DirectCU II Video Card ($309.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: XFX TS 550W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply ($74.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $900.83

    You picked up a 550W PSU. That's enough to run two smaller cards or one big GPU. I'm a fan of simpler setups so I'll take the single card most of the time. I grabbed a 280X because it's cheaper than a 4GB 770 and has nearly as much performance. I think Asus' DCII cooler is one of the best in terms of heat and noise. The 280X should have no problem with anything at 1680x1050 for a while, so I don't feel we're skimping on power.

    This build isn't designed for CPU OCing. Dropping to a locked i5 and H97 board saves nearly $130 ( $40 on CPU, $30 on cooling, $60 on mboard. ) Since you won't be running two GPUs, the H87 and mATX mboard don't hurt you.

    I added a SSD here because I think they're a fantastic addition. Strictly speaking, they don't usually increase your gaming framerates. However, they greatly speed up system boot and application startup ( including loading save games. ) With 256GB you've got space to put more than a few games and applications on it. The rest of your documents and data will reside on the spindle. But if you don't want the SSD, youcan remove it and put that $100 elsewhere. Maybe even in your wallet. I just really like the feel of one because it makes the whole system feel snappy and responsive.

    And you've still got about $100 left over for a case and keyboard. I tend not to include cases on part lists because I know the look of them is very subjective and personal. Personally, I love the Raven 3, but I know some people hate the look and don't want to spend $140 on a case. The thing is, a good case and PSU can be reused in subsequent builds for quite a few years, so spending good money once can save you in the long run.

    If you want to go the OC route, you're looking at something like this.

    PCPartPicker part list

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($239.99 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 76.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87M Extreme4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($114.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.92 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Asus Radeon R9 280X 3GB DirectCU II Video Card ($309.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: XFX TS 550W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply ($74.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $899.86

    In order to fit the OC gear, I dropped the SSD. Personally I think a SSD makes a more pronounced impact on user experience than an OC'd CPU, but that's for you to decide. Alternately, you could add in a smaller SSD by shaving a little off the GPU ( some 280X are down around $290, ) and opting for a cheaper case. You could also drop down to a 280 GPU, which wouldn't hurt you that much at 1680x1050. So you definitely have options between these two part lists.
  23. You could pick up an ASUS 770 today for $290 on newegg (after using the promo code and getting the rebate): http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121770&cm_re=asus_770-_-14-121-770-_-Product
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