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Reformatting an old HDD

I have an old HDD (#1) that was once used for a Windows boot drive, so it has all of the windows files and partitions still on it. For the new computer I just built, I have an SSD as the boot drive and another HDD (#2) as storage. The other HDD (#2) I received used also, but it had been manufacturer refurbished, so all of the files were wiped off. In short, what I would like to do is have the SSD as the boot drive and have both HDD (#1 and #2) as regular storage drives without the extra Windows files. How do I reformat the HDD (#1) I have so that the Windows files are gone and it is completely blank like the other HDD (#2) I received?
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  1. Best answer
    The most thorough way that deletes all partitions is to open up a command prompt and type:
    (each line here is typed after the one before it finishes)

    diskpart
    list disk
    select disk 1 (or whatever one is the HDD #1, you may be able to tell by size.)
    clean
    create part primary
    format fs=ntfs quick
    exit

    DONE
  2. Tcinator said:
    The most thorough way that deletes all partitions is to open up a command prompt and type:
    (each line here is typed after the one before it finishes)

    diskpart
    list disk
    select disk 1 (or whatever one is the HDD #1, you may be able to tell by size.)
    clean
    create part primary
    format fs=ntfs quick
    exit

    DONE


    That actually helps a lot because I have done the same command line sequence for making a bootable USB drive for Windows. I didn't even think about that as an option for a HDD. Thanks.
  3. If you prefer the GUI instead then in control panel go to computer management > storage> disk management and then find the disk you want to wipe and right click on each of its partitions and select 'delete volume'. Once it is all un-partitioned right click again on the un-partitioned space and create a new volume
  4. No prob mind picking it as the solution? ;)

    Note: I left out the "active" command because its not going to be bootable. (But you probably already knew that) the clean kills all partitions, even system ones so you get the full disk all to yourself.
  5. At the sake of sounding like I have no idea what I am talking about (which I don't), is that essentially completing the same task as the command line sequence?
  6. BenW1229 said:
    At the sake of sounding like I have no idea what I am talking about (which I don't), is that essentially completing the same task as the command line sequence?


    yes. as far as I know the same.
  7. BenW1229 said:
    At the sake of sounding like I have no idea what I am talking about (which I don't), is that essentially completing the same task as the command line sequence?


    yes, except a lot of times, from disk management, you cannot delete oem or system partitions, but with the "clean" command it kills everything. I prefer the CMD, but the GUI is available. (obviously)
  8. Just one more reason to love this website...not only do I get a quick answer that works, but I get more than one way to do the same thing. Thanks so much guys.
  9. BenW1229 said:
    Just one more reason to love this website...not only do I get a quick answer that works, but I get more than one way to do the same thing. Thanks so much guys.


    no problemo dude. glad to help :)
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