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What WIFI Card is good?

Hi! I need a wifi card for my PC I don't know a lot about WIFI but I think there are different types of frequencies and stuff like IEEE 802.11ac, IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n

so I was wondering what is the best WIFI CARD And what's the difference between wifi+bluetooth cards
13 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about wifi card good
  1. PCIE?
  2. Sorry My motherboard has

    Z97XSLI
    1 x PCI Express x16 slot, running at x16 (PCIEX16)
    * For optimum performance, if only one PCI Express graphics card is to be installed, be sure to install it in the PCIEX16 slot.

    1 x PCI Express x16 slot, running at x8 (PCIEX8)
    * The PCIEX8 slot shares bandwidth with the PCIEX16 slot. When the PCIEX8 slot is populated, the PCIEX16 slot will operate at up to x8 mode.
    (The PCIEX16 and PCIEX8 slots conform to PCI Express 3.0 standard.)

    3 x PCI Express x1 slots
    (The PCI Express x1 slots conform to PCI Express 2.0 standard.)

    2 x PCI slots
  3. 3 x PCI Express x1 slots
  4. Oh I see it was the 2.4 Ghz and 5.0
    Thanks blackbird
  5. SR-71 Blackbird said:
    3 x PCI Express x1 slots


    Oh guess what, the pciex1 are exactly near my gpu
    PCIEX1
    PCIEX16(GPU THAT NEEDS 2 SLOTS)
    PCIEX1(COVERED BY GPU)
    PCIEX1(USABLE BUT RIGHT INFRONT ON GPU FANS)

    Is there a PCI card?
  6. Best answer
    I'll break it down for yah.

    The IEEE 802.11AC, anything before the AC you can ignore in that string of characters, its all standard and thats all its telling you. The AC is how fast the device can theoretically be. Just bear in mind if a device can support a specific "speed" (the letters) it can support everything slower than it.

    It goes like this: A < B < G < N < AC

    Also note that anything before N is slow as balls and isn't worth buying. (It was at one time but not anymore)

    Now the best wifi card depends on use, do you intend to link up multiple PCs together (in a wireless home network, for file sharing) If so get the fastest one you can afford but for most people N is fast enough compared to the price of AC ones. (which need accompanying AC routers, same with a/b/g/n your router has to support it for it work)

    Next is do you need PCI-E or USB. If you don't know what PCI-E is then just grab a USB adapter, I am partial to the TP-Link ones but really any will do.

    In short, AC equipment is expensive and usually not worth it for the price right now. Just grab an N adapter and pocket the change since you'd most likely need to upgrade your router to AC anyhow (which is additional money obviously)

    If you want a more specific recommendation I have 5 of these in my house and they all get excellent reception and have been running for atleast 3 years with no issues. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833704045

    Edit: that took alot longer to type than I had anticipated, when I started you only had the opening post so I made assumptions on your knowledge.
  7. mouse24 said:
    I'll break it down for yah.

    The IEEE 802.11AC, anything before the AC you can ignore in that string of characters, its all standard and thats all its telling you. The AC is how fast the device can theoretically be. Just bear in mind if a device can support a specific "speed" (the letters) it can support everything slower than it.

    It goes like this: A < B < G < N < AC

    Also note that anything before N is slow as balls and isn't worth buying. (It was at one time but not anymore)

    Now the best wifi card depends on use, do you intend to link up multiple PCs together (in a wireless home network, for file sharing) If so get the fastest one you can afford but for most people N is fast enough compared to the price of AC ones. (which need accompanying AC routers, same with a/b/g/n your router has to support it for it work)

    Next is do you need PCI-E or USB. If you don't know what PCI-E is then just grab a USB adapter, I am partial to the TP-Link ones but really any will do.

    In short, AC equipment is expensive and usually not worth it for the price right now. Just grab an N adapter and pocket the change since you'd most likely need to upgrade your router to AC anyhow (which is additional money obviously)

    If you want a more specific recommendation I have 5 of these in my house and they all get excellent reception and have been running for atleast 3 years with no issues. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833704045

    Edit: that took alot longer to type than I had anticipated, when I started you only had the opening post so I made assumptions on your knowledge.


    I share things with a lot of PC'S but not at a office level, my brothers, mother, uncle and some old pc's (movies, files every once in a while)
    Thank you so much, Yes I know what a PCI-E is and I prefer it, even when It's not portable I know I'd loose it if it's removable, I loose all my usb.
  8. Sorry to write in a solved thread but I was wondering what's the difference between 2.4 and 5.0 Ghz because there are some cards with only 2 antennas for like $10 tha only support 2.4 Ghz
  9. 150Mbps ....too slow.
  10. Really? my internet has like 20Mbps
  11. :okay:
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