Under $2000 Parts List (Incl. Taxes + Shipping)

Hi everyone,

I made a post yesterday to have some suggestions on a build I am doing for gaming.
I required the parts list to be under $2000 in total for a program my company offers for an interest-free loan to buy a computer.

After some builds that were posted for me yesterday I worked with them and created a parts list of my own that comes in at $1995 with shipping and taxes. This however does not include a case or HDD- I am going to purchase these separately outside of the company program.

Original Request:

Approximate Purchase Date: Ordering parts tonight/tomorrow morning if the community is able to throw parts together that quickly.

Budget Range: $2000 All-In (My company offers a $2000 interest-free loan I would like to take advantage of but the cost must remain under $2000 taxes and shipping included).

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming and surfing

Are you buying a monitor: Yes- this is a hard one for me. I desperately need a new monitor and I really would like the ASUS VG248QE 144HZ model and have it included in the $2000 budget. It does eat up over $300 of my budget though.

Parts to Upgrade: None- New Build.

Do you need to buy OS: Windows 8

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: www.newegg.ca seems to have the best prices overall

Location: London, Ontario, Canada (13% Tax)

Parts Preferences: Intel

Overclocking: Maybe- have never done it, I am not planning to OC right away, but may tray i to in the future.

SLI or Crossfire: Possibly in the future

Your Monitor Resolution: As stated above- ASUS VG248QE 144HZ

Additional Comments: I play mostly FPS games (CS:GO 90% of the time), I would like to dabble into some RP games now that I will have a system that can run them properly.

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: having issues running ALL games on my 7-year old Gateway FX Desktop (GTX 260)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($284.17 @ DirectCanada)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($36.39 @ DirectCanada)
Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste ($6.92 @ DirectCanada)
Motherboard: Asus Z97-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($167.72 @ DirectCanada)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($95.37 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Crucial MX100 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($141.57 @ Newegg Canada)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Superclocked ACX Video Card ($628.42 @ Newegg Canada)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($145.57 @ Newegg Canada)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($30.57 @ Newegg Canada)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($122.41 @ DirectCanada)
Monitor: Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor ($327.46 @ DirectCanada)
Total: $1986.57
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

That is what I have compiled.

My main concerns after tweaking the price with different parts are:
-The i7 vs the i5 (I really would have liked the i7)
-Dropping from 16GB DDR3 1866Mhz to 8GB DDR3 1600Mhz
-Dropping video card from the GTX 780 6GB to the GTX 780 3GB
-Does this build 'work' as in is everything compatible?

I would like to get a case, HDD and a DisplayPort cable for somewhere in the range of $180-$220 if anyone could make some recommendations.

Thanks for all your help in advance!

Brandon
12 answers Last reply
More about 2000 parts list incl taxes shipping
  1. pretty good build... though you missed the case. i swapped around a few parts, filled out the build a little, spent a little more money for "better" parts in some cases. I do suggest you actually try windows 8 before you buy it though.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($251.48 @ DirectCanada)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($32.21 @ DirectCanada)
    Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste ($6.13 @ DirectCanada)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z97X-Gaming 3 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ NCIX)
    Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($79.99 @ Amazon Canada)
    Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($209.00 @ Canada Computers)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.79 @ DirectCanada)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Superclocked ACX Video Card ($554.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($54.24 @ DirectCanada)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($129.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.75 @ Vuugo)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($108.33 @ DirectCanada)
    Monitor: Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor ($288.95 @ Vuugo)
    Total: $1917.82
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
  2. Seems pretty good to me. But the prices are slightly different. Here it says $1986 but on PCPP it says $1751. Is it because of the American/Canadian dollar difference?
  3. ingtar33 said:
    pretty good build... though you missed the case. i swapped around a few parts, filled out the build a little, spent a little more money for "better" parts in some cases. I do suggest you actually try windows 8 before you buy it though.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($251.48 @ DirectCanada)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($32.21 @ DirectCanada)
    Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste ($6.13 @ DirectCanada)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z97X-Gaming 3 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ NCIX)
    Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($79.99 @ Amazon Canada)
    Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($209.00 @ Canada Computers)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.79 @ DirectCanada)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Superclocked ACX Video Card ($554.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($54.24 @ DirectCanada)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($129.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.75 @ Vuugo)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($108.33 @ DirectCanada)
    Monitor: Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor ($288.95 @ Vuugo)
    Total: $1917.82
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available


    Thanks for the answer, I do know that I did miss the case. I left out case and HDD as they would have put me over my $2000 work budget. I was going to buy them separately and had not yet picked them yet.

    EDIT: I forgot to add that I was also trying to keep this build to a maximum of 2 parts websites just due to the fact my company program will accept a maximum of 2 invoices for the whole build.
  4. Francisco Costa said:
    Seems pretty good to me. But the prices are slightly different. Here it says $1986 but on PCPP it says $1751. Is it because of the American/Canadian dollar difference?


    I am assuming that since your preference would be set to USA that the prices would automatically transfer over into USD rather than CAD.
  5. i would like to add, that you might want to consider getting a smaller ssd and use that strictly for the OS and a 1tb hdd for games and other storage (music/pictures/documents).

    Also, you can avoid the monitor being so pricey if you get one with 60hz refresh rate. 120hz and 144hz are newer and will cost more and are still getting better/cheaper.
  6. a44arana said:
    i would like to add, that you might want to consider getting a smaller ssd and use that strictly for the OS and a 1tb hdd for games and other storage (music/pictures/documents).

    Also, you can avoid the monitor being so pricey if you get one with 60hz refresh rate. 120hz and 144hz are newer and will cost more and are still getting better/cheaper.


    that's a good idea in theory, but i have a 120gb ssd, and really wish i had a bigger one. i won't tell a guy who has the budget for a bigger one to not get a bigger one.
  7. a44arana said:
    i would like to add, that you might want to consider getting a smaller ssd and use that strictly for the OS and a 1tb hdd for games and other storage (music/pictures/documents).

    Also, you can avoid the monitor being so pricey if you get one with 60hz refresh rate. 120hz and 144hz are newer and will cost more and are still getting better/cheaper.


    I wanted to avoid that monitor but at the same time I desperately need an upgrade. After reviewing and reading about the Asus one I had to throw it in. I really want to try this 144Hz out.

    Also- any noticeable difference for me in this setup between 1600 and 1866 DDR3 RAM?
  8. b_spades said:
    a44arana said:
    i would like to add, that you might want to consider getting a smaller ssd and use that strictly for the OS and a 1tb hdd for games and other storage (music/pictures/documents).

    Also, you can avoid the monitor being so pricey if you get one with 60hz refresh rate. 120hz and 144hz are newer and will cost more and are still getting better/cheaper.


    I wanted to avoid that monitor but at the same time I desperately need an upgrade. After reviewing and reading about the Asus one I had to throw it in. I really want to try this 144Hz out.

    Also- any noticeable difference for me in this setup between 1600 and 1866 DDR3 RAM?


    not really... intel cpus have such fast L3 cache that ram speeds tend to have almost no impact on performance. (it does impact the igpu on the chip... but who cares about that?)
  9. ingtar33 said:
    b_spades said:
    a44arana said:
    i would like to add, that you might want to consider getting a smaller ssd and use that strictly for the OS and a 1tb hdd for games and other storage (music/pictures/documents).

    Also, you can avoid the monitor being so pricey if you get one with 60hz refresh rate. 120hz and 144hz are newer and will cost more and are still getting better/cheaper.


    I wanted to avoid that monitor but at the same time I desperately need an upgrade. After reviewing and reading about the Asus one I had to throw it in. I really want to try this 144Hz out.

    Also- any noticeable difference for me in this setup between 1600 and 1866 DDR3 RAM?


    not really... intel cpus have such fast L3 cache that ram speeds tend to have almost no impact on performance. (it does impact the igpu on the chip... but who cares about that?)


    That's good to hear, makes the price a little cheaper.
    What about dropping my 6GB to the 3GB GTX 780, would I notice much of a difference in the extra 3GB with this build?
  10. b_spades said:
    ingtar33 said:
    b_spades said:
    a44arana said:
    i would like to add, that you might want to consider getting a smaller ssd and use that strictly for the OS and a 1tb hdd for games and other storage (music/pictures/documents).

    Also, you can avoid the monitor being so pricey if you get one with 60hz refresh rate. 120hz and 144hz are newer and will cost more and are still getting better/cheaper.


    I wanted to avoid that monitor but at the same time I desperately need an upgrade. After reviewing and reading about the Asus one I had to throw it in. I really want to try this 144Hz out.

    Also- any noticeable difference for me in this setup between 1600 and 1866 DDR3 RAM?


    not really... intel cpus have such fast L3 cache that ram speeds tend to have almost no impact on performance. (it does impact the igpu on the chip... but who cares about that?)


    That's good to hear, makes the price a little cheaper.
    What about dropping my 6GB to the 3GB GTX 780, would I notice much of a difference in the extra 3GB with this build?



    No, 6GB and 3GB are almost the same. 6GB is useless in 1080p
  11. 6gb on video card would benefit you only if you planned on having multiple monitors and also for video editing purposes.
  12. b_spades said:
    ingtar33 said:
    b_spades said:
    a44arana said:
    i would like to add, that you might want to consider getting a smaller ssd and use that strictly for the OS and a 1tb hdd for games and other storage (music/pictures/documents).

    Also, you can avoid the monitor being so pricey if you get one with 60hz refresh rate. 120hz and 144hz are newer and will cost more and are still getting better/cheaper.


    I wanted to avoid that monitor but at the same time I desperately need an upgrade. After reviewing and reading about the Asus one I had to throw it in. I really want to try this 144Hz out.

    Also- any noticeable difference for me in this setup between 1600 and 1866 DDR3 RAM?


    not really... intel cpus have such fast L3 cache that ram speeds tend to have almost no impact on performance. (it does impact the igpu on the chip... but who cares about that?)


    That's good to hear, makes the price a little cheaper.
    What about dropping my 6GB to the 3GB GTX 780, would I notice much of a difference in the extra 3GB with this build?



    not really... in 1080p 3gb probably won't be maxed soon (that said watchdogs DID kiss 2.5gb in 1080p, before they patched it and fixed that), if anything 3gb should be good for 1440p... and might even be alright for most titles in 5760*1080 (3 1080p monitors)... we do see it bottle-necking a little bit in 4k though.

    The only purpose to a 6gb 780; is to eventually get a 2nd one for SLi... if you have no plans for another one, then don't bother getting the 6gb version.
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