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Simple Water Cooling Overclock Question

Quick question for those inclined to help:

Looking at a new custom loop for my current setup; and I've been doing a lot of research. I've gotten really good overclocks so far out of my EVGA 780 Ti but want to push it farther into water territory so I'm getting the EK waterblock for it and plan the loop to be like so:

Pump/Res> GPU > CPU > 240 Rad > Pump/Res

My question is can I do this all with a 750 or D5 pump and with a single 240 Rad. I seem to have gotten really lucky with my i7 4820k and have it running 4.5GHz very cool already on a cheap $40 Asetek closed loop 120mm and wouldn't want to push it any further (Barely hits 68C in Prime95), the main reason for adding it to the loop is to consolidate everything and keep it looking fancy (http://i1200.photobucket.com/albums/bb340/JohnHuffer/Waterworks/photo4_zps77297616.jpg).

tl;dr question: Is a 750 or D5 pump and a single 240mm Rad enough to cool a 780 Ti and 4820k significantly. If not should I be looking to add another 120mm rad? Change the 240 to a 280? get a better pump?

Thanks for the help.
5 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about simple water cooling overclock question
  1. Fananagram said:
    Quick question for those inclined to help:

    Looking at a new custom loop for my current setup; and I've been doing a lot of research. I've gotten really good overclocks so far out of my EVGA 780 Ti but want to push it farther into water territory so I'm getting the EK waterblock for it and plan the loop to be like so:

    Pump/Res> GPU > CPU > 240 Rad > Pump/Res

    My question is can I do this all with a 750 or D5 pump and with a single 240 Rad. I seem to have gotten really lucky with my i7 4820k and have it running 4.5GHz very cool already on a cheap $40 Asetek closed loop 120mm and wouldn't want to push it any further (Barely hits 68C in Prime95), the main reason for adding it to the loop is to consolidate everything and keep it looking fancy (http://i1200.photobucket.com/albums/bb340/JohnHuffer/Waterworks/photo4_zps77297616.jpg).

    tl;dr question: Is a 750 or D5 pump and a single 240mm Rad enough to cool a 780 Ti and 4820k significantly. If not should I be looking to add another 120mm rad? Change the 240 to a 280? get a better pump?

    Thanks for the help.

    Prolly should at least to get a 360 radiator. Usually you want a 240 rad for just a overclocked cpu. A 360 radiator should be a good fit if you got room in your case.


  2. Fananagram said:
    Quick question for those inclined to help:

    Looking at a new custom loop for my current setup; and I've been doing a lot of research. I've gotten really good overclocks so far out of my EVGA 780 Ti but want to push it farther into water territory so I'm getting the EK waterblock for it and plan the loop to be like so:

    Pump/Res> GPU > CPU > 240 Rad > Pump/Res

    My question is can I do this all with a 750 or D5 pump and with a single 240 Rad. I seem to have gotten really lucky with my i7 4820k and have it running 4.5GHz very cool already on a cheap $40 Asetek closed loop 120mm and wouldn't want to push it any further (Barely hits 68C in Prime95), the main reason for adding it to the loop is to consolidate everything and keep it looking fancy (http://i1200.photobucket.com/albums/bb340/JohnHuffer/Waterworks/photo4_zps77297616.jpg).

    tl;dr question: Is a 750 or D5 pump and a single 240mm Rad enough to cool a 780 Ti and 4820k significantly. If not should I be looking to add another 120mm rad? Change the 240 to a 280? get a better pump?

    Thanks for the help.

    Or a 280 would work depending on thickness since you got a good chip. The pump is fine I would opt for the D5 pump over the 750.


  3. Best answer
    Fananagram said:
    Quick question for those inclined to help:

    Looking at a new custom loop for my current setup; and I've been doing a lot of research. I've gotten really good overclocks so far out of my EVGA 780 Ti but want to push it farther into water territory so I'm getting the EK waterblock for it and plan the loop to be like so:

    Pump/Res> GPU > CPU > 240 Rad > Pump/Res

    My question is can I do this all with a 750 or D5 pump and with a single 240 Rad. I seem to have gotten really lucky with my i7 4820k and have it running 4.5GHz very cool already on a cheap $40 Asetek closed loop 120mm and wouldn't want to push it any further (Barely hits 68C in Prime95), the main reason for adding it to the loop is to consolidate everything and keep it looking fancy (http://i1200.photobucket.com/albums/bb340/JohnHuffer/Waterworks/photo4_zps77297616.jpg).

    tl;dr question: Is a 750 or D5 pump and a single 240mm Rad enough to cool a 780 Ti and 4820k significantly. If not should I be looking to add another 120mm rad? Change the 240 to a 280? get a better pump?

    Thanks for the help.


    I suggest keeping your CPU and GPU separated, you're already cooling the CPU, you do not want to add the 2 heat producers together in the same loop and hope for a miracle, because you will be disappointed with your overclocking limitations.

    If you are only after cooling your GPU for higher overclocks then leave your CPU out of it or you'll be disappointed with the end overclock results.

    Water cooling works great as long as you invest in enough radiator cooling field to do the job, and many make the same mistakes over and over here, by not having what they really need to put it all in one loop.

    Why do you think some of the higher end CLC cooling solutions come with a 240 radiator just to cool the CPU?

    Think about It!

    Do not buy any kit or such as that with the pump housed inside the reservoir!

    A D5 variable speed pump will be all you'll need with upgrade capabilities later below is 2 different D5 Pump/Reservoir combos, keep in mind you'll buy your GPU full coverage water block separately.

    Cylinder Style:

    http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=59_367&products_id=39186

    Dual Bay Style:

    http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=59_367&products_id=34679

    240 Radiator for GPU only:

    http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=59_457_667_200&products_id=40654

    Then all you need is fans, fittings, tubing, and coolant, (I run 100% steam distilled water).

    If you buy a kit, you'll get a CPU water block, and you'll want to run it all in a single loop, that's fine as long as overclocking is not the goal, when overclocking is the goal you do not want the combined heat to defeat the reason you wanted to water cool in the first place!

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2196038/air-cooling-water-cooling-things.html
  4. 4Ryan6 said:
    Fananagram said:
    Quick question for those inclined to help:

    Looking at a new custom loop for my current setup; and I've been doing a lot of research. I've gotten really good overclocks so far out of my EVGA 780 Ti but want to push it farther into water territory so I'm getting the EK waterblock for it and plan the loop to be like so:

    Pump/Res> GPU > CPU > 240 Rad > Pump/Res

    My question is can I do this all with a 750 or D5 pump and with a single 240 Rad. I seem to have gotten really lucky with my i7 4820k and have it running 4.5GHz very cool already on a cheap $40 Asetek closed loop 120mm and wouldn't want to push it any further (Barely hits 68C in Prime95), the main reason for adding it to the loop is to consolidate everything and keep it looking fancy (http://i1200.photobucket.com/albums/bb340/JohnHuffer/Waterworks/photo4_zps77297616.jpg).

    tl;dr question: Is a 750 or D5 pump and a single 240mm Rad enough to cool a 780 Ti and 4820k significantly. If not should I be looking to add another 120mm rad? Change the 240 to a 280? get a better pump?

    Thanks for the help.


    I suggest keeping your CPU and GPU separated, you're already cooling the CPU, you do not want to add the 2 heat producers together in the same loop and hope for a miracle, because you will be disappointed with your overclocking limitations.

    If you are only after cooling your GPU for higher overclocks then leave your CPU out of it or you'll be disappointed with the end overclock results.

    Water cooling works great as long as you invest in enough radiator cooling field to do the job, and many make the same mistakes over and over here, by not having what they really need to put it all in one loop.

    Why do you think some of the higher end CLC cooling solutions come with a 240 radiator just to cool the CPU?

    Think about It!

    Do not buy any kit or such as that with the pump housed inside the reservoir!

    A D5 variable speed pump will be all you'll need with upgrade capabilities later below is 2 different D5 Pump/Reservoir combos, keep in mind you'll buy your GPU full coverage water block separately.

    Cylinder Style:

    http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=59_367&products_id=39186

    Dual Bay Style:

    http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=59_367&products_id=34679

    240 Radiator for GPU only:

    http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=59_457_667_200&products_id=40654

    Then all you need is fans, fittings, tubing, and coolant, (I run 100% steam distilled water).

    If you buy a kit, you'll get a CPU water block, and you'll want to run it all in a single loop, that's fine as long as overclocking is not the goal, when overclocking is the goal you do not want the combined heat to defeat the reason you wanted to water cool in the first place!

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2196038/air-cooling-water-cooling-things.html





    Thanks for the detailed response. Is there a particular reason to avoid the integrated pump/res like the 750 X20 Rev 4? I'm leaning towards a D5 with res and a single 360 rad with my 3 NF-F12s, that should be enough to keep my current 4.5 GHz OC (currently running off flimsy closed loop 120mm) and possibly get a bit more out of my 780 Ti right?

    I'll be flashing a custom bios to push the Ti a bit further but as it stands heat isn't crazy now (http://i1200.photobucket.com/albums/bb340/JohnHuffer/toms_zpsc0caa6fa.png) and that's after just average gaming sessions (albiet never really go pushed hard like in Prime95) the 780 Ti barely goes above 73 even in Furmark
  5. The X20 reservoir/pump combos haven't been historically that great of pumps and while the newer versions are better, they are still not as powerful and really not useful for much more than a single CPU loop.

    Pump/res combos can be difficult to prime and get going, initially, and many report noise due to vibration. That being said, there are plenty of people that use them, but you just need to know what you are getting and what to keep in mind when building your loop.

    A single 240 isn't going to be enough for that configuration; you're likely going to need in the neighborhood of at least 1x120 more worth of radiator space, depending on radiators and fans used. This all comes down to temperatures you are comfortable with. With a 240 and 120 and adequate fans, I would expect similar CPU temps as you are seeing now and lower GPU temps by around 15-20C. If you are expecting much lower temps, you need to calculate the temperatures you wish to reach and adjust your build according to this delta.
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