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Future Proof Twin Build?

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July 10, 2014 3:22:04 PM

I know I have asked this before, however I have put a lot of thought into this build...limit is 2,500 each (3,000 if its a good enough reason) so a total of 5,000 (6,000 if need be) for both systems...them of the corsair build has to be purple...and the theme of the nzxt build has to be red/black. Now on to the requitements they both must have 27" monitors and optical bays are a must. Also the corsair case is final, the nzxt case isn't yet but I want it to be a full tower with a window and hidden opticals.

The corsair build is for gaming ans schooling.

The Nzxt build is for video rendering and encoding, along with gaming and a full time media server for my Xbox. This computer needs to have a 4 terabyte dedicated to movies, and a second harddrive for all the downloads and things...plus a ssd.

Anyways sorry for the wall of text, here's what I have so far...

Nzxt build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i7-4790K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X61 106.1 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($129.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Asus MAXIMUS VII HERO ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($209.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Trident X 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($77.98 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Hitachi Deskstar NAS 4TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($184.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Asus Radeon R9 290 4GB DirectCU II Video Card ($349.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: NZXT Phantom 630 Windowed Edition (Black) ATX Full Tower Case ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 1300 G2 1300W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($159.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Asus VE278H 27.0" Monitor ($214.99 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: NZXT Air Flow Series 83.6 CFM 140mm Fan ($12.98 @ OutletPC)
Case Fan: NZXT Air Flow Series 83.6 CFM 140mm Fan ($12.98 @ OutletPC)
Case Fan: Rosewill Hyperborea 89.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Rosewill Hyperborea 89.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Rosewill Hyperborea 89.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Rosewill Hyperborea 89.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Rosewill Hyperborea 89.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Rosewill Hyperborea 89.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Rosewill Hyperborea 89.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Rosewill Hyperborea 89.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Fan Controller: NZXT SENTRY 3 Fan Controller ($30.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Keyboard: Microsoft SIDEWINDER X4 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($41.98 @ Newegg)
Mouse: Cooler Master CM Storm Spawn Wired Optical Mouse ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Speakers: Genius SW-G2.1 1250 38W 2.1ch Speakers ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Other: NZXT Hue ($32.99)
Other: G2/P2 Red Power Supply Cable Set (Individually Sleeved) (EVGA) ($100.00)
Total: $2519.64
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

Cosair build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i7-4790K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H110 94.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Z97-PRO(Wi-Fi ac) ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($202.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($169.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.91 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Superclocked ACX Video Card ($479.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 760T Black ATX Full Tower Case ($149.99 @ Micro Center)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 1000 P2 1000W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($169.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (32/64-bit) ($94.99 @ NCIX US)
Monitor: Asus VE278Q 27.0" Monitor ($234.99 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Quiet Edition 67.8 CFM 140mm Fan ($17.99 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Quiet Edition 67.8 CFM 140mm Fan ($17.99 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Purple 66.4 CFM 140mm Fan ($15.30 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Purple 66.4 CFM 140mm Fan ($15.30 @ Newegg)
Keyboard: Logitech K800 Wireless Slim Keyboard ($64.99 @ Amazon)
Other: NZXT HUE RGB Led Controller ($32.99)
Other: Logitech F310 (940-000110) Gamepad ($29.99)
Other: G2/P2 Black Power Supply Cable Set (Individually Sleeved) ($89.99)
Other: Creative T15 Wireless Bluetooth 2.0 Computer Speaker System ($59.99)
Total: $2490.32
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

Thanks again all suggestions are welcome :-)
July 10, 2014 3:32:37 PM

Build #1:
1. Too many case fans. I don't know why you have so many. More fans does not equate to better cooling. You want good airflow, not more air turbulence. Air is a poor conductor of heat. It is not efficient at cooling. All those fans will be loud too.

2. PSU is overkill. If you're going to CrossFireX the card, do it with the budget and not later. Even with CrossFireX, you don't need 1300W.

3. Drop the fan controller.

4. Replace the monitor with an IPS one.

5. Why do you need two optical drives? Two of the same as well. How many CD / DVDs do you plan to use?

6. Drop the 4TB HDD. Buy it when you need it.


Build #2:
1. Again, more fans.

2. More of the same comment as #1.
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July 10, 2014 3:41:10 PM

I plan on replacing all the fans in the case with the rosewill fans even the ones on the radiator, no I will not drop the fan controller on mine because I want to make cooling zones. The 4 terabyte will be used right away btw. I have over 2 tearbytes movies right now. I plan to triple crossfire the cards at some point...and you didn't read the description this is a full time media center meaning I will always be ripping she's sometimes 2 at a time....
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Related resources
July 10, 2014 3:48:26 PM

I also agree with what Ksham said.

Build 1: Main entertainment build

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i7-4790K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X61 106.1 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($129.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: MSI Z97-G45 Gaming ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($140.91 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($152.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($77.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 6GB Superclocked ACX Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($579.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 6GB Superclocked ACX Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($579.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair 760T Black ATX Full Tower Case ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Pioneer BDR-209DBK Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($54.99 @ Amazon)
Monitor: Acer H236HLbid 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($168.49 @ Amazon)
Monitor: Acer H236HLbid 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($168.49 @ Amazon)
Monitor: Acer H236HLbid 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($168.49 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Cooler Master JetFlo 95.0 CFM 120mm Fan ($16.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Cooler Master JetFlo 95.0 CFM 120mm Fan ($16.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $2946.24
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available


Build 2 for Gaming/School

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus Z97-PRO(Wi-Fi ac) ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($202.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($81.00 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.91 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Superclocked ACX Video Card ($479.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 760T Black ATX Full Tower Case ($149.99 @ Micro Center)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($66.66 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (32/64-bit) ($94.99 @ NCIX US)
Monitor: Asus VE278Q 27.0" Monitor ($234.99 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Quiet Edition 67.8 CFM 140mm Fan ($17.99 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Quiet Edition 67.8 CFM 140mm Fan ($17.99 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Purple 66.4 CFM 140mm Fan ($15.30 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Purple 66.4 CFM 140mm Fan ($15.30 @ Newegg)
Keyboard: Logitech K800 Wireless Slim Keyboard ($64.99 @ Amazon)
Other: NZXT HUE RGB Led Controller ($32.99)
Other: Logitech F310 (940-000110) Gamepad ($29.99)
Other: G2/P2 Black Power Supply Cable Set (Individually Sleeved) ($89.99)
Other: Creative T15 Wireless Bluetooth 2.0 Computer Speaker System ($59.99)
Total: $2117.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
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Best solution

July 10, 2014 4:04:43 PM

Build # 1

1. newegg reviews report that Asus Z97 Hero is afflicted by Asus BIOS Clock Freeze bug (see 2nd page of reviews at top).

http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?33895-Hero-Tim...

The MSI GD-65 Z97 is $40 cheaper and a feature for feature match up and down .... and besides....it has the best assembly video .... you'll prolly watch at least once a day :) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvNnv7nh2Es


2. The Kraken ($120) outperforms the Noctua by 1 C, the Phanteks ($65) outperforms the Noctua ($80) by 1 C....for twice the price, the I don't see the Kraken for 1C ....not with the noise generated at 2000 rpm versus just 1200 rpm on the Phanteks



3. You should be able to get 1866 / 2133 RAM for same price.... 2400 maybe $15 more.

4. Look here before buying those HDs

http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/hdd-charts-2013/-02-...

5. The Phanteks Case substantially edges the NZXT in features, price and performance.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Phantom 630 - 8.95 rating
http://archive.benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=co...

Enthoo Pro - 9.5 rating
http://benchmarkreviews.com/15792/phanteks-enthoo-pro-t...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBhmn21ylkc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guBAl6g8BlY

6. The Phanteks fans are literally "the best there is" and $9.99 every other week on newegg
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1345-page7.html
http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/phenteks_f140/3...

But of course they won't do the red / purple think you going for. And I give this as a word of caution, one thing I can say for the Phanteks Enthoo Primo case.....you can turn off the Fan LEDs'..... which has turned out to be a welcome feature ....I think, as others have reported, the LEDs begin to wear on you after a while.

7. The 27" 1920 x 1080 screen will appear grainy of sitting at normal viewing distances. See here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dot_pitch

The human eye can start to see individual pixels at 96 dpi....the more you go below that the "grainier" the image appears. At 27" your pixel pitch is 83.8 ppi.

I'd use a 23.6" Dell or Asus IPS here.

8. You maximum power draw will be around 500 watts .... why 1300 watt PSU .... in CF, you'd need 750 w/ overclocking....3x CF maybe 1000 - 1050 watts

9. The Asus built in fan Controls are superior to the NZXT controller....and yes, with the MoBo you can have 4 separate cooling zones. Here's what I am doing all using Asus MoBo and FanXpert2:

Zone 1 = CPU_1 and CPU_2 => 2 water pumps
Zone 2 = CHA_1 => 6 case Fans
Zone 3 = CHA_2 => 6 Fans on 3 x 140mm Radiator
Zone 4 = CHA_3 => 4 Fans on 2 x 140mm Radiator

For build # 2...

1 thru 8 above still apply....except that the monitor for gaming should be a 144 Hz TN Mode. Nothing else even comes close to 144Hz:

BenQ IPS Panel


Asus TN 144 Hz


9. While the Classified is a great card, the EVGA 780 SC is the proverbial "bottom of the barrel"
http://us.hardware.info/reviews/4639/10/nvidia-geforce-...

Asus wins the roundup in that as with most reviews but MSi released the new 780 N gaming Series since boosting it's clock by 52 Mhz making it the Asus equal and the MSI is the quietest of the bunch. It's also $30 cheaper.

Consideration of the above will improve your system while dropping cost, enough so that you could get the best GFX card out there right now outside the Classified Kingpin.

The MSI 780- Ti gets a 9.9 rating from techpowerup, is a whopping 6-8 dbA quieter than the competition and is lower priced than any other model.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/MSI/GTX_780_Ti_Gamin...

Quote:
MSI's GTX 780 Ti is almost too good to be true. The card comes overclocked out of the box, to 1020 MHz base clock, which, thanks to Boost 2.0, runs the card at 1144 MHz on average - higher than most other custom GTX 780 Ti cards. Compare this to the GTX 780 Ti reference board and it results in a significant 8% percent performance improvement, making it the fastest graphics card we ever tested. Yes, even faster than the dual-GPU HD 7990 and GTX 690. Compared to AMD's Radeon R9 290X, the difference is 16%, which is about as much as the R9 290X's lead over the previous-generation HD 7970 GHz. It would have been nice to see a small bump in memory clocks, too. I suspect some kind of limitation from NVIDIA's side there since nearly no custom board partner increased memory clock beyond the memory chips' rated frequency.

What is even more amazing is that MSI has achieved these fantastic performance results without scorching temperatures or lots of fan noise. While MSI uses a reference-design PCB, they have opted for the latest version of their well-known dual-fan TwinFrozr thermal solution, which we've seen on other cards before. Temperatures reach only 78°C, which is well below the temperature limit beyond which Boost 2.0 starts reducing clocks to keep the card cool. The real highlight of the MSI GTX 780 Ti Gaming, however, is fan noise. The card is whisper quiet in idle, which will be important if you don't game all the time. More importantly, once you start gaming, fan speed increases just a little bit, enough to keep the card cool without all hell breaking loose. At just 30 dBA, the MSI GTX 780 Ti Gaming is quieter than most graphics cards, no matter their performance segment - and this is the fastest card we ever tested! I recently reviewed several GTX 780 Ti cards, by all the big players, and none are even close in noise levels. It really is a night and day difference, even more so when you start comparing this card to AMD's R9 290X flagship.

Overclocking of our card worked well, providing another 5% performance improvement. Not a huge difference, it is probably still enough to make looking into manual overclocking worthwhile. When I disassembled the card, I spotted a missing thermal pad on the voltage regulation circuitry. I can't say if it is an isolated issue or whether it's widespread. What I can say, however, is that the card was perfectly stable at all times, no issues encountered.

You can find MSI's GTX 780 Ti Gaming online right now for $710[ NOT ! = $600], which is just a small $10 price increase over the reference design cards, and definitely worth it. Compared to other premium models in the $730 range, the card is also much better than other premium models in the $730 range, and in every metric that matters except for, maybe, maximum manual OC, which also has a luck-of-the-draw element to it. If you don't want to spend that much money on a graphics card, AMD's R9 290/290X could be more affordable alternatives, but be prepared to experience much higher noise and temperatures. I, for my part, will be replacing my personal system's ASUS GTX 670 Direct CU with the MSI GTX 780 Ti Gaming as it's the best card I've reviewed in a long time.



As for RAM, at 1920 x 1080 anything more than 2 -3 GB will provide no performance benefit

http://alienbabeltech.com/main/gtx-770-4gb-vs-2gb-teste...

Quote:
This leaves five games out of 30 where a 4GB GTX 770 gives more than a 1 frame per second difference over the 2GB-equipped GTX 770. And one of them, Metro: Last Light still isn’t even quite a single frame difference.

Of those five games, two of them are unplayable at 5760×1080 although in these cases, 4GB GTX 770 SLI would finally make some sense over 2GB GTX 770 SLI. That only leaves Lost Planet 2 and two racing games that gain some advantage by choosing a single GTX 770 4GB card over the single GTX 770 2GB. And in Lost Planet 2, we were able to add even higher anti-aliasing – from 8xAA to CSAA8XQ and to CSAA32X – but the performance difference was greatest with 8xAA.

There is one last thing to note with Max Payne 3: It would not normally allow one to set 4xAA at 5760×1080 with any 2GB card as it claims to require 2750MB. However, when we replaced the 4GB GTX 770 with the 2GB version, the game allowed the setting. And there were no slowdowns, stuttering, nor any performance differences that we could find between the two GTX 770s.


That last paragraphs is key ..... even when the game says it uses more than the 2GB, there were no slowdowns, stuttering, nor any performance differences that we could find between the [2 GB and 4GB cards].
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July 10, 2014 4:25:17 PM

Sorry I was on my phone earlier (kinda hard to type with auto-correct going crazy) I missed alot of what you said when I looked earlier...I don't mean to sound like a noob but with the hard drive sheet higher is better right, or is lower better? The phanteks case was my second choice in line...maybe I'll take a look at that...I think I am going to stick with water cooler for now (I like the look of them & I really want to try out the new kraken x61). I definetly like your suggestions and are going to incorporate them into my build...I will post a final build when done with it...as for the LED effects, that is what they make the NZXT Hue for, and led fans to match them.
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July 10, 2014 10:16:19 PM

anyone there?
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July 11, 2014 5:28:33 PM

The top of the charts is better ....look at the top....score is in MB/sec
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July 12, 2014 1:36:49 PM

On that NZXT build - do you seriously need to spend over $200 in case fans and PSU cables? That just seems like an absolute waste of money, plus your case won't hold all of those fans. On both builds you're also spending way too much money on useless accessories you don't need. You could drop a lot of that stuff and spend it more where it counts.

This is what I would suggest on $2500 with monitor:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake Water 3.0 Extreme 99.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z97 EXTREME6 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($144.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($82.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M550 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($156.90 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.92 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB WINDFORCE Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($649.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB WINDFORCE Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($649.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 Blackout with Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($107.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-14 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $2403.72
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

Dropped all the junk for dual GTX 780TIs - that is where it will count. Add whatever monitor, keyboard and mouse you want.
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July 12, 2014 5:56:44 PM

Um yes actually I do cause its a enthusit build as for the dual 780 tis I only want one graphics card less problems and dual 780 tis are pointless since its kinda rare to use that much gpu power on gaming. My build needs to have at least 16 gb for encoding and multitasking as well. This tread is solved thank you for the input tho, the little details in this case are what is going to set it apart from anything else.
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July 12, 2014 6:03:16 PM

ddbtkd456 said:
Um yes actually I do cause its a enthusit build as for the dual 780 tis I only want one graphics card less problems and dual 780 tis are pointless since its kinda rare to use that much gpu power on gaming. My build needs to have at least 16 gb for encoding and multitasking as well. This tread is solved thank you for the input tho, the little details in this case are what is going to set it apart from anything else.


Well if you need that much RAM that's one thing, but there's no enthusiast build out there that requires $300 in case fans and sleeved cables. You're seriously just throwing money away at that point. Most graphics intense games like Bioshock and Wolfenstein *DO* require that much GPU horsepower, so that is where the dual 780TIs will come in handly, and if you're paying that much for a rig, running it in 1080P is kinda pointless. If you're spending that much on a PC, you want at least 1440P or better would be 4K, but that would get really pricey in the long run.
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July 12, 2014 9:03:44 PM

I have actually updated both builds recently didint realize I didn't have that posted.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i7-4790K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X61 106.1 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($129.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Asus MAXIMUS VII HERO ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($209.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Trident X 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($77.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($599.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro ATX Full Tower Case ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 1000 P2 1000W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($169.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus PB278Q 27.0" Monitor ($476.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Rosewill Hyperborea 89.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Rosewill Hyperborea 89.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Rosewill Hyperborea 89.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: NZXT FZ-200mm LED 103.0 CFM 200mm Fan ($19.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Fan Controller: NZXT SENTRY 3 Fan Controller ($31.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Keyboard: Perixx PX-1100 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Speakers: Genius SW-G2.1 1250 38W 2.1ch Speakers ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Other: NZXT Hue ($32.99)
Other: G2/P2 Red Power Supply Cable Set (Individually Sleeved) (EVGA) ($100.00)
Total: $2736.77
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

And

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i7-4790K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H110 94.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Z97-PRO(Wi-Fi ac) ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($202.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($169.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.91 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($649.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 760T Black ATX Full Tower Case ($149.99 @ Micro Center)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 1000 P2 1000W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($169.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (32/64-bit) ($94.99 @ NCIX US)
Monitor: Asus PB278Q 27.0" Monitor ($476.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Quiet Edition 67.8 CFM 140mm Fan ($17.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Quiet Edition 67.8 CFM 140mm Fan ($17.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Quiet Edition 67.8 CFM 140mm Fan ($17.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Purple 66.4 CFM 140mm Fan ($16.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF140 Purple 66.4 CFM 140mm Fan ($16.99 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Logitech K800 Wireless Slim Keyboard ($64.99 @ Amazon)
Headphones: Rosewill RHTS-8206 5.1 Channel Headset ($39.99 @ Amazon)
Other: NZXT HUE RGB Led Controller ($32.99)
Other: Logitech F310 (940-000110) Gamepad ($29.99)
Other: G2/P2 Black Power Supply Cable Set (Individually Sleeved) ($89.99)
Other: Creative T15 Wireless Bluetooth 2.0 Computer Speaker System ($59.99)
Total: $2960.69
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
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July 14, 2014 3:34:55 PM

g-unit1111 said:

Well if you need that much RAM that's one thing, but there's no enthusiast build out there that requires $300 in case fans and sleeved cables. You're seriously just throwing money away at that point. Most graphics intense games like Bioshock and Wolfenstein *DO* require that much GPU horsepower, so that is where the dual 780TIs will come in handly, and if you're paying that much for a rig, running it in 1080P is kinda pointless. If you're spending that much on a PC, you want at least 1440P or better would be 4K, but that would get really pricey in the long run.


Requirements differ by individual. Nobody needs custom sleeved cables for performance reasons; like a $150 case paint job it's purely an aesthetic choice. As for 1440p, lotta peeps like myself can't be bothered until they have them at 144 Hz.

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July 14, 2014 3:46:00 PM

ddbtkd456 said:
I have actually updated both builds recently didn't realize I didn't have that posted.


1. With two Asus boards, I'm hoping ya don't get hit w/ the BIOS clock freeze bug. I have two Hero and one "A" build affected.

2. Corsair 2400 memory was same price as their 1600 lest week.... haven't checked this week.

3. 1000 watts will cover SLI if you go there in future .... so would 850.....650 will work for 1 card

4. Those Rosewill fans require standoffs when used as intake fans..... fan blades extend beyond frame and hit case.

5. The Enthoo case has built in fan controller.....if you're not going to use it, I'd be interested in taking off ya hands.

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July 14, 2014 5:32:11 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
ddbtkd456 said:
I have actually updated both builds recently didn't realize I didn't have that posted.


1. With two Asus boards, I'm hoping ya don't get hit w/ the BIOS clock freeze bug. I have two Hero and one "A" build affected.

2. Corsair 2400 memory was same price as their 1600 lest week.... haven't checked this week.

3. 1000 watts will cover SLI if you go there in future .... so would 850.....650 will work for 1 card

4. Those Rosewill fans require standoffs when used as intake fans..... fan blades extend beyond frame and hit case.

5. The Enthoo case has built in fan controller.....if you're not going to use it, I'd be interested in taking off ya hands.



The enthoo case fan controller when I order it (late late this year or early next year) you can certainly have it...(free of charge I might add)...I like the NZXT fan controller and the cable sleeves for the purely aesthetic reasons...I want them to be as clean as can be....and the stand offs I did not know about....I'll take my chances with the Asus boards...and both computers are planned to be SLI'd in the future :) 
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July 14, 2014 5:40:32 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
g-unit1111 said:

Well if you need that much RAM that's one thing, but there's no enthusiast build out there that requires $300 in case fans and sleeved cables. You're seriously just throwing money away at that point. Most graphics intense games like Bioshock and Wolfenstein *DO* require that much GPU horsepower, so that is where the dual 780TIs will come in handly, and if you're paying that much for a rig, running it in 1080P is kinda pointless. If you're spending that much on a PC, you want at least 1440P or better would be 4K, but that would get really pricey in the long run.


Requirements differ by individual. Nobody needs custom sleeved cables for performance reasons; like a $150 case paint job it's purely an aesthetic choice. As for 1440p, lotta peeps like myself can't be bothered until they have them at 144 Hz.



Well yeah I completely agree there, but if you're paying $2500 for a single 1080p monitor configuration and put all the aesthetic crap in behind performance, IMO, you're doing it wrong.

Quote:
The enthoo case fan controller when I order it (late late this year or early next year) you can certainly have it...(free of charge I might add)...I like the NZXT fan controller and the cable sleeves for the purely aesthetic reasons...I want them to be as clean as can be....and the stand offs I did not know about....I'll take my chances with the Asus boards...and both computers are planned to be SLI'd in the future :) 


Why not drop all the useless aesthetic things you don't need and go SLI now? Why would you pay that much money just for looks?
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July 14, 2014 6:07:25 PM

Why to people pay $100s of dollars for Prada shoes ???? Pay $50k for a Corvette ???? Why to people put set of $2000 rims on their car .... $1000's of dollars for artwork ...... they like the way it looks. I hand cut each piece of acrylic tubing on my build, just to get a certain look.....took days. A PC is not only machine that does work, it's a piece of furniture and can even a piece of artwork.

As for fans.... some people like quiet rigs ..... when I'm working I don't wanna hear any noise, at all ..... I find it too distracting. More fans at low speed are silent and provide the same cooling as a smaller amount of fans that make lotta noise.

As for the monitors, given the choice between 1440p, 4 k or 1080p and 144 hz, .... I'll take 144 Hz.
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July 14, 2014 6:20:28 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
Why to people pay $100s of dollars for Prada shoes ???? Pay $50k for a Corvette ???? Why to people put set of $2000 rims on their car .... $1000's of dollars for artwork ...... they like the way it looks. I hand cut each piece of acrylic tubing on my build, just to get a certain look.....took days. A PC is not only machine that does work, it's a piece of furniture and can even a piece of artwork.

As for fans.... some people like quiet rigs ..... when I'm working I don't wanna hear any noise, at all ..... I find it too distracting. More fans at low speed are silent and provide the same cooling as a smaller amount of fans that make lotta noise.

As for the monitors, given the choice between 1440p, 4 k or 1080p and 144 hz, .... I'll take 144 Hz.


Well my philosophy on builds is usually (as in 9 times out of 10, there's always the rare exception) is to put performance above aesthetics. And on a $2500 PC I'd go SLI without thinking about it, and add the aesthetics later. I totally get wanting a quiet PC though, I just switched from a Corsair 600T to an NZXT H440 - the silence from the sound dampening material on the H440 is like night and day compared to the 600T.
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July 14, 2014 6:48:01 PM

Well that's just it ..... everyone has different requirements or goals .... if we didn't, everyone could buy the same thing and the custom build market would have no "Raison d'être"
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July 14, 2014 6:54:07 PM

Hahaha...I am going to SLI later, just for my own reasons...when she games she doesn't game the newest stuff right away...and neither do I...as of right now I have no reason to go SLI, and in the future once I get these two built, and my server (custom NAS Storage) built I will invest in SLI. For mine its more of the way I want it to fit together....I am going to create something with these its my form of art...
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July 14, 2014 6:56:53 PM

Understood..... I design water treatment plants for living and this is my company's "Signature Builds". Was designed to look like one of our plants.
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