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Can Someone Double Check my Computer Build?

So, I created my first computer build. It's gonna be a high-end Gaming/Graphics build, and my price is $1000. I left $30 of space for misc. items that I know I missed such as CPU cooler, DVD Drive, and fans. I don't quite know where to start with these since this is my first build I just want to make sure everything will work. Here's the link: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/6TMbTW

also I don't know if it matters, but I was worried about cooling so, here's what the case fans are:
  • 1 x 230mm top fan (exhaust) with 3-speed switch control
  • 1 x 230mm side fan (intake)
  • 2 x 140mm front fans (intake)
  • 1 x 120mm rear fan (exhaust)
4 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about double check computer build
  1. Just get 2 x 4gb ram. Its not a 3 channel motherboard - http://www.asrock.com/mb/AMD/990FX%20Extreme4/?cat=Specifications
    use 2 or 4 sticks of identical ram

    If you ever want to overclock the cpu, you'll need a custom cooler eg coolermaster hyper 212 evo

    Change that power supply to a better quality one eg Seasonic 620, XFX 650 or Antec HCG 620M
  2. That looks good. Couple of suggestions:
    1) Don't get 3 RAM sticks. You want to pair your RAM so that it can run in dual channel mode. AMD memory controllers are already pretty slow, so you want to make sure you've got what you need. 2x4GB is enough for most people, but if you need more get a 2x8GB matching pair.
    2) If you have the budget I'd recommend a 120GB SSD for your system boot. It just makes a massive difference to the subjective feel of the computer, loading, installing updates, etc. If it was me, I'd even drop down to a 280, 8GB RAM and put the extra into an SSD. The Kingston V300 is half price on Newegg at the moment, just $55: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820721107

    Otherwise, nice build.
  3. rhysiam said:
    That looks good. Couple of suggestions:
    1) Don't get 3 RAM sticks. You want to pair your RAM so that it can run in dual channel mode. AMD memory controllers are already pretty slow, so you want to make sure you've got what you need. 2x4GB is enough for most people, but if you need more get a 2x8GB matching pair.
    2) If you have the budget I'd recommend a 120GB SSD for your system boot. It just makes a massive difference to the subjective feel of the computer, loading, installing updates, etc. If it was me, I'd even drop down to a 280, 8GB RAM and put the extra into an SSD. The Kingston V300 is half price on Newegg at the moment, just $55: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820721107

    Otherwise, nice build.


    What do you mean by 120GB SSD for boot? Is this just for the OS?
  4. Best answer
    General advice is to use the SSD for the OS, most programs (unless you have a number of really large programs, in which case you'll need to put some on the HDD or fork out for a larger SSD), and possibly a key game or two you play all the time.

    SSDs are between 100 and 1000 times faster than a HDD when it comes to chugging through heaps of tiny reads and writes, which is exactly what happens on system boot and loading programs. It won't help your FPS in games, but subjectively makes a massive difference.

    If your budget is tight you may prefer to put your money elsewhere, you wouldn't be alone. I'm really just raising it as a possibility. I personally, will never again build a computer without an SSD, they just make so much difference. It really depends on what your priorities are.
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