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CPU doesn't boot, no beep codes, no video after heat wave.

I have a Gateway SX2370
AMD A6-3620 APU

After a heat wave and leaving my computer running (I think), I came to use my computer and couldn't get any video. The power light was on, so I thought it was asleep but moving the mouse or keying the keyboard did not wake it up, so I did a hard shut down by pressing power button. The computer will not POST and I can't hear a beep code, I don't think there is an on board speaker. I have only a USB speaker and I'm not sure if that gets initialized until the computer starts into Windows, so I guess useless. I can see and hear the fan running and the power lights come on, so I'm guessing power is not the problem, but CPU got too hot and burned out, but I don't know how to verify. Could RAM have burned up, or just CPU? Should I just buy a new CPU and install? How to test that before purchase?
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More about cpu boot beep codes video heat wave
  1. This checklist will most likely solve your issue (note: I suspect it is a failed PSU or RAM - but go through the wntire list):

    http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/faq/id-1893016/post-system-boot-video-output-troubleshooting-checklist.html
  2. herrwizo said:
    This checklist will most likely solve your issue (note: I suspect it is a failed PSU or RAM - but go through the wntire list):

    http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/faq/id-1893016/post-system-boot-video-output-troubleshooting-checklist.html


    Thank you for the link, but I did already read through that. I even started to follow the steps, but basically, that checklist looks like it's for someone who assembled their own computer. This is a computer I bought assembled and haven't opened the case since purchase two years ago (until just tonight when I started that checklist). I think it's very unlikely that any lose wires/connections are the problem. In fact, as I said, the computer was running when it failed (asleep I think), indicating to me that the connections were all fine, and nothing has bumped or moved the computer that I know of.

    I will admit that I just moved about a week and half ago. However, I moved the computer in the same box it was shipped in, and I've used it for about a week and half since moving to new place, so I know all the connetions were fine.

    I gave all other connections a good look in any case, and everything visible/accessible to me looks fine. I'm not going to remove the fan to check the CPU because I'm told the thermal compound seal will be ruined potentially.

    Need to know what are the most likely causes of a computer not starting up, given the heat wave. I can try installing the little speaker dealio if that will really be a critical step to solving this issue. i.e. will the beep code REALLY tell me what is wrong?

    ******
    I also wanted to add that over the past few months, I have experienced a BSOD (maybe about 4 times) attributed to the graphics card failing while I was streaming videos to my Sony TV connected as a second monitor. Computer always restarted fine after BSOD, but i never really resolved that happening, so I suppose the graphics card could have ended it's life when I wasn't looking. I just don't know if that would also prevent the computer from POSTing.

    P.S. I only sound like I know what I"m talking about. I don't know much more than what i'm telling you. Thanks for any assitance. Computers are so frustrating :(
  3. Best answer
    OK, then try this:

    0) reset CMOS on the motherboard and try again
    1) pull out all RAM sticks and return only 1 of them; try booting
    2) if you can't, replace this stick with another one and try again
    3) if you can't, try replacing the graphics card with the cheapest one you can find or borrow one for test. If you can, test your memory and graphics card in another computer to verify they are working.
    4) if this doesn't help, replace the PSU with a borrowed one and try again
    5) if none of the above helps... the only possible solutions are that either mobo (more likely) or CPU (less likely) are defective
  4. herrwizo said:
    OK, then try this:

    0) reset CMOS on the motherboard and try again
    1) pull out all RAM sticks and return only 1 of them; try booting
    2) if you can't, replace this stick with another one and try again
    3) if you can't, try replacing the graphics card with the cheapest one you can find or borrow one for test. If you can, test your memory and graphics card in another computer to verify they are working.
    4) if this doesn't help, replace the PSU with a borrowed one and try again
    5) if none of the above helps... the only possible solutions are that either mobo (more likely) or CPU (less likely) are defective


    OK. I will try these steps. "Reset CMOS" is the same as "reboot CMOS" "reset BIOS" and this is basically done by removing and reinserting the CMOS battery, right?
  5. Correct. You can do it either with a jumper near the battery or by removing the battery for a few seconds.
  6. herrwizo said:
    Correct. You can do it either with a jumper near the battery or by removing the battery for a few seconds.


    At the moment, I'm feeling quite ashamed. I went ahead and tried unplugging everthing from the computer and booting with just the PSU (sort of like step 23 on the checklist), and the computer automatically restarted when I plugged the power cord back in to the PSU (which seemed wierd - I didn't have to press the power button?), but...it started all the way into windows...granted a little slowly. I had one more false start, unplugging and plugging back in the plug to the PSU, but now it seems to be restarting consistently without any need to tighten the connection. I have the ethernet, mouse and keyboard plugged in on the last successful restart.

    I'm pretty mystified that the computer could have been getting enough power to run the fan and lights but not actually go through POST. Completely mystified. And I'm confused why it just starts as soon as I plugged it in. I don't think that has been the case in the past. How is that happening?

    I haven't tried plugging all the components back in and restarting yet, but hopefully, I have a working computer, and I've only wasted your time a tiny bit. But is the described restarting behavior concerning enough that there could still be a problem I should investigate?

    Thank you.
  7. No reason to worry. Believe it or not, all it sometimes takes is to unplug everything and put it back. Loose connection somewhere can easily cause this. Keep on connecting stuff, but one by one. If the computer fails after you add a specific component, you might have a defective component. It is likely that everything will be normal, though.
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