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Mount an FX heatsink on a A10-7850k?

Here's the situation. I'm building a real budget gaming machine and I decided on giving the new Kaveri APUs a try. Overall, I'm really happy with it but the temps (in BIOS) are at 63 C on the stock cooler and that's a little high for my liking. I do intend to replace it with a third-party heatsink or AIO liquid cooler. However, I do have a stock heatsink from an FX-8320 sitting around and I heard you could mount AM3+ coolers on the FM2+ socket. I wonder if it work a little better seeing as that thing really needed the better cooler that I put on it. Afterall, the TDP on the A10 is nearly 100W less than the FX.
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  1. If its 63C on idle, then that's way too high. The FM2 socket is different and probably won't fit the AM3+ cooler. But try if you want.

    Before you try, make sure the cooler you've got is seated on the cpu correctly - remove it and re-paste it. and make sure it's well cleaned out. And make sure your fan speed is say 1500rpm or more. And check your Vcore is around 1.35V. If its higher, it'll overheat.
  2. Dreigo42 said:
    Here's the situation. I'm building a real budget gaming machine and I decided on giving the new Kaveri APUs a try. Overall, I'm really happy with it but the temps (in BIOS) are at 63 C on the stock cooler and that's a little high for my liking. I do intend to replace it with a third-party heatsink or AIO liquid cooler. However, I do have a stock heatsink from an FX-8320 sitting around and I heard you could mount AM3+ coolers on the FM2+ socket. I wonder if it work a little better seeing as that thing really needed the better cooler that I put on it. Afterall, the TDP on the A10 is nearly 100W less than the FX.


    FX-8320 - 125w
    A10-7850k - 95w

    that's not 100w difference...

    But yes it should work
  3. UPDATE: Tried re-seating the heatsink with new Arctic Silver and was still at 60-65 C in the BIOS. Fan running at 2100RPM so the fan isn't bad and VCore is 1.35V +/- .05V. For the record, the AM3+ and FM2+ Heatsink mounts are identical and interchangeable. The FX's heatsink mounted without an issue and it now idles around 50-55 C. So a definite improvement overall. I still haven't found a program that accurately reports the temps in Windows so I can't give prime95 temps with any certainty but the difference in readings dropped 20 C. Will definitely be getting something better. Probably a Hyper T4 (for it's native AMD mounting) or the Seidon 240 AIO Cooler cause it will fit nicely into my N600 on the back panel. (NOTE: My house struggles to stay below 74-76 F this time of year so that doesn't help this.) Now if I can only find out why my 1600mhz memory is always reporting 1333mhz in task manager regardless of BIOS settings.....
  4. | I still haven't found a program that accurately reports the temps in Windows|

    Use bios/uefi
  5. Best answer
    i7Baby said:
    | I still haven't found a program that accurately reports the temps in Windows|

    Use bios/uefi


    The BIOS reports the same sensors dude. Usually socket - which isn't much help.
    They're slightly higher because the chip is clocked at its maximum frequency in the BIOS before any power-saving stuff kicks in.

    @OP
    Yes it should work fine. To my knowledge the AM sockets have identical mounting mechanisms to the FM sockets. The stock heatsink that comes with the APUs is a bit less efficient, you won't gain huge temperature differences considering the stock FX heatsink is barely capable of cooling the FX chips, but it is all copper compared to the silver/metallic APU ones. It's worth a shot.

    Plus as someone said the TDP is slightly lower. Not by huge amounts but that should aid things a bit.

    Also your memory may be clocked at that level because you need to select the factory profile for it in the BIOS. All DDR3 is clocked at 1333MHz, it's actually the brand that overclocks it and attaches 'said profile.
  6. APU temperatures can be a real bear. If AMD overdrive, or CoreTemp. Those have had the highest success rate, for me, for reading APU thermals.

    As for mounting solutions and sockets, AMD has standardized their measurements for mounting since AM2. This basically means any modern aftermarket cooling solution can fit on any modern AMD socket.
  7. Thanks for all the help! I ended up installing the FX heatsink and it really did make a difference. Dropped idle temps by 5 and Prime95 loaded Temps by 10. I still think I'm going to end up putting a 240 AIO Water cooler (possibly an h100i or seidon 240) in it simply because my N600 case has a nice spot for it. As for the memory, I did set the speeds manually in the BIOS and all is fine there.
    @Calculatron
    I decided to use the Easy Tune6 that came with my Gigabyte board. Not the greatest software but it works. I tried core temp but it was reading below room temp. As for AMD Overdrive, I've never seen it display CPU temps. I've only ever seen it display GPU temps.
  8. Was your system idling, when you read the below-room-temperature reading?

    If so, that's, uh, actually a good thing.

    There are two types of thermal sensors: Socket and Core. Socket temperatures are great for when idling, but tend to read 5-15C higher when the CPU is at load. The CPU Core temperatures are modified by a type of equation to offset this, so they are actually the most accurate when the CPU is at load, but tend to be strange (often below-ambient) when the CPU is near-idling.

    I have a Biostar A85W motherboard housing an A10-5800K, and I get no less than four (4) different temperature readings. One is the CPU socket, another is the CPU Socket (which reads through CoreTemp), another is based off of the CPU Core but reads +10C higher, and, last but not least, another has crazy temperatures that range from 60-90C.

    AMD Overdrive should read CPU temperature - you may have to select the "CPU Status" tab under Status Monitor. As a warning, AMD Overdrive now measures thermal margins, rather than giving a straight reading - so it given you a reading based on how close you are to a certain limit.

    Anyway, put your CPU under a load (preferably with Prime95). Depending on your case, airflow, etcetera, I wouldn't be surprised if the reading was somewhere between 40-50C with CoreTemp.
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