Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Urgent, which is better for a high end gaming desktop?

Last response: in Systems
Share
July 16, 2014 9:14:40 AM

This is my planned build:

Case: Corsair 750D - $159.99
CPU: i7 4390K 3.4GHz 2011 Six Core CPU - $579.99
GPU: EVGA 03G-P4-2888-KR GeForce GTX 780Ti - $729.99
PSU: EVGA SuperNova P2 1000W - $209.99
RAM: G-Skill Trident X Series (4x 4GB) 2400MHz - $179.99
MOBO: ASUS Rampage IV Black Edition LGA 2011 Motherboard - $481.99
Cooling: Corsair H100i Liquid Cooling - $99.99

It will be for gaming on ultra settings on a single 1440p monitor, I would like to get 60fps+ on all games. I also plan to stream on twitch and make some small videos, (I know i7's aren't needed for gaming, but I don't want to limit myself if I ever get more into video editing/streaming) . Or I could go with this:

Case: Corsair 750D - $159.99
CPU: i5 4690K 3.5GHz 1150 Quad Core CPU - $238.99
GPU: 2x EVGA 03G-P4-2888-KR GeForce GTX 780Ti - $1460.99 or Sapphire Radeon R9 295x2 8GB - $1599
PSU: EVGA SuperNova P2 1000W - $209.99
RAM: G-Skill Trident X Series (2x 8GB) 2400MHz - $189.99
MOBO: MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-Z97X LGA 1150 Intel Z97Gaming Motherboard - $359.99
Cooling: Corsair H100i Liquid Cooling - $99.99

The second option would cost $100/$239 more but would get two GPUs for SLI config. So which is better for gaming @ 1440p on all ultra settings and mild video streaming/editing, and which is more future proof?

Edit: Changed MOBO on second option
July 16, 2014 9:27:41 AM

Yeah, i got over 60 fps with one 270x with an A10-5700! I would go with the i7-4790k, it has much stronger single core performance and higher clock frequencies. However, a major downside to Intel is their motherboards rarely have dual x16 pcie lanes. That is something to seriously consider if you want to SLI. Consider just one or the r9-295x2 with the i7-4790k.

There is a major drop from the first CPU with 6 cores and 12 threads, vs the mid ranged i5 with only 4 cores and 4 threads! The i7-4790k has 4 cores and 8 threads. It will allow you to do video editing, etc and will be more "future proof" do to its: 1) higher clock frequencies 2) 8 threads
m
0
l
July 16, 2014 9:28:11 AM

And I am sure you can get a great motherboard for a much cheaper price. Just a suggestion.
m
0
l
Related resources
July 16, 2014 9:29:47 AM

TomSkini said:
Do not go with the i 7 4390k if the build is for gaming, you will not see any difference performance wise. Also, you will get way over 60 fps on most games with a single 780 ti.


Yes and no, I want to get 60+fps on games out now and coming out in 2015 with high AA and everything else set to ultra. The 780 ti already slacks a little in Watch Dogs (I know the game isn't optimized the best but still). I know I won't notice a huge performance increase but there is an increase non the less. So with this all said, the second option is still the better one for extreme intensive gaming and mild video editing/streaming?

m
0
l
July 16, 2014 9:33:53 AM

titanHUNTER said:
Yeah, i got over 60 fps with one 270x with an A10-5700! I would go with the i7-4790k, it has much stronger single core performance and higher clock frequencies. However, a major downside to Intel is their motherboards rarely have dual x16 pcie lanes. That is something to seriously consider if you want to SLI. Consider just one or the r9-295x2 with the i7-4790k.

There is a major drop from the first CPU with 6 cores and 12 threads, vs the mid ranged i5 with only 4 cores and 4 threads! The i7-4790k has 4 cores and 8 threads. It will allow you to do video editing, etc and will be more "future proof" do to its: 1) higher clock frequencies 2) 8 threads


That is true, and I respect your point. From my point of view though, if I am going to get an i7 I might as well just get an amazing one (excluding the extreme editions). I see what you mean by the motherboards not supporting x16 x16, I'll have to look and see if I can find one that can support that, thanks.

m
0
l
July 16, 2014 9:39:27 AM

Not with the i5 it isn't. Get the i7-4790k (instead of the i5 and i7 you have listed). And from what I read online, Watch Dogs was not a very good designed game.

High AA is dependent upon VRAM availability. The r9-295x2 you have listed is literally two r9-290x chips into one GPU. It has 8GB and 1024-bit memory bandwidth. It should run on Ultra settings with 8x FXAA above 60+ fps.

With your budget, I would go with the i7-4790k and the r9-295x2. You will be future proofed for years to come.

I have an FX-8350 OC'd to 4.5 GHz with two 270x in Crossfire and I never drop below 60 fps in ANY game. However, some titles I still cannot max out. Titanfall can go up to 8x MSAA. Nevertheless, most games I run on Ultra 1080p with 2x or 4x AA and I average 60 to 80 fps. If I disable AA, then I am over 100 fps in ALL titles!

You will be fine! ;) 
m
0
l
July 16, 2014 9:40:47 AM

The second build is better right now. The first build is more future proof. With the Rampage IV Black Edition you can go up to 64GB of RAM, and 4 GPUs in SLI.
m
0
l
July 16, 2014 9:48:13 AM

sprinter461 said:
The second build is better right now. The first build is more future proof. With the Rampage IV Black Edition you can go up to 64GB of RAM, and 4 GPUs in SLI.


What do you mean by, "...right now"? If we are talking like in 1-3 years I will have to upgrade the CPU to a 6 core to run modern games then I'd rather get it now and just keep upgrading the GPU.
m
0
l

Best solution

July 16, 2014 9:56:53 AM

Sens said:
sprinter461 said:
The second build is better right now. The first build is more future proof. With the Rampage IV Black Edition you can go up to 64GB of RAM, and 4 GPUs in SLI.


What do you mean by, "...right now"? If we are talking like in 1-3 years I will have to upgrade the CPU to a 6 core to run modern games then I'd rather get it now and just keep upgrading the GPU.




Dude, if you get the i7-4790k (NOT the i5-4690k), you will NOT be upgrading CPUs in the next three years. You will only upgrade if you want to. I run modern titles on Ultra above 60 fps with two 270x. Two of those cards equals one 290x.

The 295x2 that you are getting is two 290x! You will be fine! Unless you are an engineer for NASA or do serious CADD/statistical analysis, you will not be using more than 8GB of ram anytime in the future.

By the time you can utilize 64GB of ram, DDR4 RAM will be out! So 8GB of DDR4 will probably be faster than even your 64GB of DDR3! That much RAM is a total waste unless 1) for bragging rights; 2) to make inside of rig look super awesome; 3) you are an engineer for NASA or some super tech company.
Share
July 16, 2014 9:59:29 AM

In fact, I have an FX-8350 at 4.5GHz and I still don't need to upgrade CPUs! In fact, as modern games utilize more threads, and with its high clock frequency even by today's standards (it was released in 2012), I will not have to upgrade CPUs in the next three years (unless I just want to). As time goes on, the 8 cores will be utilized more and more. Just like the 8 threads of the i7-4790k (not the 4 measly threads of the i5).-
m
0
l
July 16, 2014 10:13:54 AM

I might suggest the i7-4790K.
Very few games will use more than 2-3 cores. A few faster cores are better.
At stock, it runs 4.0 and 4.4 turbo.
The hyperthreads will help with any multicore apps.

I wasted money on the trident X 2400 ram.
It turned out that my 4790K ran hotter when the ram was set at 2400, needing 1.65v.
I would use ram that runs at 1.5v and lower cas numbers, even if it is slower like 1600.
Read this on ram scaling:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/7364/memory-scaling-on-ha...
If you want 16gb, buy a 2 x 8gb kit. Ram is only dual channel and 2 sticks is easier for the motherboard to manage. Cheaper too. And... buy a low profile kit.

The heat you get from haswell is determined by your luck of the bin and how well it will do at 1.25v.
Normally that will be 4.4-4.6. Past 1.25v, heat rises rapidly, and no amount of cooling will let you run at a safe voltage.
I would use a Phanteks or noctua NH-d15 cooler with dual 140 mm fans. It will be cheaper, more reliable, quieter, and safer than a H100.

Start with a single GTX780ti. If you really need a second one for 4k gaming, you can add it later.
Your 1000w psu should be ok for that.
m
0
l
July 16, 2014 11:12:11 AM

titanHUNTER said:
Sens said:
sprinter461 said:
The second build is better right now. The first build is more future proof. With the Rampage IV Black Edition you can go up to 64GB of RAM, and 4 GPUs in SLI.


What do you mean by, "...right now"? If we are talking like in 1-3 years I will have to upgrade the CPU to a 6 core to run modern games then I'd rather get it now and just keep upgrading the GPU.




Dude, if you get the i7-4790k (NOT the i5-4690k), you will NOT be upgrading CPUs in the next three years. You will only upgrade if you want to. I run modern titles on Ultra above 60 fps with two 270x. Two of those cards equals one 290x.

The 295x2 that you are getting is two 290x! You will be fine! Unless you are an engineer for NASA or do serious CADD/statistical analysis, you will not be using more than 8GB of ram anytime in the future.

By the time you can utilize 64GB of ram, DDR4 RAM will be out! So 8GB of DDR4 will probably be faster than even your 64GB of DDR3! That much RAM is a total waste unless 1) for bragging rights; 2) to make inside of rig look super awesome; 3) you are an engineer for NASA or some super tech company.


I am going to just go with my first option. Reason being because the 780 ti is powerful enough to run all games on ultra settings and most with high AA. I know the 4930k is overkill for gaming, but I have the money to spend and I'd rather get a really nice CPU. I didn't mention that I already own an i7 4770k, so the upgrade to the i7 4790k would be only a slight difference. Yes, I also know there is no point in upgrading to the 4930k because the 4770k is fine, but oh well. I will probably get the 780 ti 6GB when it comes out, and since Vram doesn't stack it adds another reason to not getting dual GPU's just yet I guess.
m
0
l
July 16, 2014 11:14:09 AM

geofelt said:
I might suggest the i7-4790K.
Very few games will use more than 2-3 cores. A few faster cores are better.
At stock, it runs 4.0 and 4.4 turbo.
The hyperthreads will help with any multicore apps.

I wasted money on the trident X 2400 ram.
It turned out that my 4790K ran hotter when the ram was set at 2400, needing 1.65v.
I would use ram that runs at 1.5v and lower cas numbers, even if it is slower like 1600.
Read this on ram scaling:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/7364/memory-scaling-on-ha...
If you want 16gb, buy a 2 x 8gb kit. Ram is only dual channel and 2 sticks is easier for the motherboard to manage. Cheaper too. And... buy a low profile kit.

The heat you get from haswell is determined by your luck of the bin and how well it will do at 1.25v.
Normally that will be 4.4-4.6. Past 1.25v, heat rises rapidly, and no amount of cooling will let you run at a safe voltage.
I would use a Phanteks or noctua NH-d15 cooler with dual 140 mm fans. It will be cheaper, more reliable, quieter, and safer than a H100.

Start with a single GTX780ti. If you really need a second one for 4k gaming, you can add it later.
Your 1000w psu should be ok for that.


I've been reading that the i7 4930k doesn't even support 2400Mhz, only up to 1866Mhz I will have to do more research into that. I will take your suggestion though and go with the single 780 ti for now and see where it leads me, thanks.
m
0
l
July 16, 2014 11:42:58 AM

geofelt said:
I might suggest the i7-4790K.
Very few games will use more than 2-3 cores. A few faster cores are better.
At stock, it runs 4.0 and 4.4 turbo.
The hyperthreads will help with any multicore apps.

I wasted money on the trident X 2400 ram.
It turned out that my 4790K ran hotter when the ram was set at 2400, needing 1.65v.
I would use ram that runs at 1.5v and lower cas numbers, even if it is slower like 1600.
Read this on ram scaling:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/7364/memory-scaling-on-ha...
If you want 16gb, buy a 2 x 8gb kit. Ram is only dual channel and 2 sticks is easier for the motherboard to manage. Cheaper too. And... buy a low profile kit.

The heat you get from haswell is determined by your luck of the bin and how well it will do at 1.25v.
Normally that will be 4.4-4.6. Past 1.25v, heat rises rapidly, and no amount of cooling will let you run at a safe voltage.
I would use a Phanteks or noctua NH-d15 cooler with dual 140 mm fans. It will be cheaper, more reliable, quieter, and safer than a H100.

Start with a single GTX780ti. If you really need a second one for 4k gaming, you can add it later.
Your 1000w psu should be ok for that.




Even thought this topic has been solved, there are two inaccuracies in this statement. First, most modern games use 3 to 8 cores. The only game that I own that only uses two cores is Starcraft 2. BF3/4 will use ALL available. Titanfall uses 4 to 6. Games that were released like 2011 and backwards only use 1 to 2 cores. All modern titles scale now.

Secondly, ram is NOT only dual channel. For his first build, he had a server processor. That motherboard only supports quad channel memory. The specs are in the link below.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
m
0
l
!