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XFX Radeon R9 280X Double Dissipation VS MSI R9 270X

Finally, I've got some money to upgrade my current graphics card from 270x to 280x. Will there be any drastic changes if I upgrade it to XFX Radeon R9 280X Double Dissipation 3GB VRAM?
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  1. Best answer
    Yes. The R9 280X is significantly faster than a R9 270X.
  2. ksham said:
    Yes. The R9 280X is significantly faster than a R9 270X.


    Yes, I concur. But what about the brand (XFX)?
  3. They're okay. Not much different from MSI's Twin Frozr.
  4. ksham said:
    They're okay. Not much different from MSI's Twin Frozr.


    Oh okay, then. Thanks your for quick help. And one more thing, I'm using Cooler Master GX II 550W PSU. Can I continue with the same PSU?
  5. I would strongly advice that you replace it. That power supply is close to the bottom of the list in terms of build quality. Replace it with a Seasonic, XFX, Antec, OCZ, or Corsair (TX / HX).

    550W is fine for a R9 280X. Keep in mind that it's not the wattage that is important, but the build quality and the total ampere rating on the +12V rail.
  6. How to find the ampere rating on +12V rail? I have to admit that I know nothing about this. All I know is this PSU (CM GXII 550w) is 80 Plus Bronze Certified. Does that imply anything?

    Update: I found a label on the PSU. I think its 44A for +12V rail.
  7. MostWantedSoulRider said:
    How to find the ampere rating on +12V rail?

    The label on the power supply tells you. If you are buying online, it should be listed.


    MostWantedSoulRider said:
    I have to admit that I know nothing about this. All I know is this PSU (CM GXII 550w) is 80 Plus Bronze Certified. Does that imply anything?

    It implies very little. 80+ certification measures the power supply's efficiency rating at converting AC to DC. For an 80+ Bronze power supply at 50% load, it has an efficiency rating of 85%. This means that during the conversion from AC to DC, 15% of that power is lost. So if your system requires 500W at 50% load, the power supply needs to pull 589W from the wall.

    80+ certification does not determine the power supply's build quality or performance. It is possible to have good conversion rating while being built with cheap capacitors and under-performing. There is no rule that says the power supply has to be able to handle heavy load well to be 80+ certified. So you can be gaming and you are running on heavy load and the power supply can't handle it and causes your system to crash.
  8. ksham said:
    MostWantedSoulRider said:
    How to find the ampere rating on +12V rail?

    The label on the power supply tells you. If you are buying online, it should be listed.


    MostWantedSoulRider said:
    I have to admit that I know nothing about this. All I know is this PSU (CM GXII 550w) is 80 Plus Bronze Certified. Does that imply anything?

    It implies very little. 80+ certification measures the power supply's efficiency rating at converting AC to DC. For an 80+ Bronze power supply at 50% load, it has an efficiency rating of 85%. This means that during the conversion from AC to DC, 15% of that power is lost. So if your system requires 500W at 50% load, the power supply needs to pull 589W from the wall.

    80+ certification does not determine the power supply's build quality or performance. It is possible to have good conversion rating while being built with cheap capacitors and under-performing. There is no rule that says the power supply has to be able to handle heavy load well to be 80+ certified. So you can be gaming and you are running on heavy load and the power supply can't handle it and causes your system to crash.


    Oh, I see. Now I'm knowing something about PSU's. Anyway, I think you missed the UPDATE part on my above post, ksham. For my PSU, it states 44A for +12V rail. How's that?
  9. That is fine; but the build quality of your power supply is still crap so I strongly advice replacing it. As I've said earlier, a power supply built on cheap and poor capacitors will not handle heavy load well and can cause crashes and freezes mid-game. This will also affect your other components because their lifespan is cut short by the power supply.

    The power supply has to provide electrical power to every component. This is a sensitive area. The power supply has big shoes to fill. A bad one with poor ripple suppression or bad voltage regulation will cause harm to your other components. And there are a lot of them because the power supply is connected to EVERY SINGLE ONE.
  10. Thanks for your quick help, ksham. But one thing to be noted is, I can't afford another power supply for hopping into 280x from 270x. I think I'm going to wait for some more days, reconsider my budget limit and then afford both GPU and PSU together.
  11. ksham said:
    That is fine; but the build quality of your power supply is still crap so I strongly advice replacing it. As I've said earlier, a power supply built on cheap and poor capacitors will not handle heavy load well and can cause crashes and freezes mid-game. This will also affect your other components because their lifespan is cut short by the power supply.

    The power supply has to provide electrical power to every component. This is a sensitive area. The power supply has big shoes to fill. A bad one with poor ripple suppression or bad voltage regulation will cause harm to your other components. And there are a lot of them because the power supply is connected to EVERY SINGLE ONE.


    http://www.flipkart.com/antec-vp550-550-watts-psu/p/itmd5xz45hr9fyu5
    Will this be good to go?
  12. Corsair VS650.

    The one you chose is not Haswell-compatible and not great. The Corsair one that I picked is a tier above it, but still not ideal. But if you are worked up on price, you may as well get the better of the two.

    If you want a really good quality power supply, here are two:
    Seasonic S12II 520W
    Seasonic S12II 620W

    620W provides better upgrade path to more demanding graphics card without having to get a new power supply as often.
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