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Using Old Hard Drive as a Secondary Storage Drive

Tags:
  • Windows
  • Computers
  • Storage
  • Hard Drives
  • File Transfer
Last response: in Storage
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July 18, 2014 2:33:06 AM

I know there are a lot of threads just like this one, but none really asking the same questions. I just bought a new custom built computer and I'm wondering if I can use my old, un-formatted hard drive as a secondary hard drive on-top of the new one I'm putting in and installing windows on. They both will be having the same OS but what about the drivers and the windows folder and all that stuff that's in the old hard drive? What folders/ files should I delete? Would it be possible to play the games that are on the old hard drive with the new computer, as well as would programs like Microsoft Word, etc work? I have a pretty slow internet connection and it would take days to re download the hundreds of gigabytes of games I have on the old hd on to the new hd, would it be possible to transfer the games/steam folder directly to the new hd and would it then be playable? I'm sorry as some of these questions are pretty dumb but because of some of the wording on other threads similar to this one, I am led to believe nothing but simple files such as pictures and videos on the old hd will work on the new computer.

More about : hard drive secondary storage drive

July 18, 2014 3:31:52 AM

I have done this myself , using old Os disks as Secondary storage platters I have no issues with running and accessing the content on those drives , you have to make sure that you extend ownership of that data and you can access most of the applications on the disk .... with some exceptions which require windows integration.

Add the secondary disk and open Windows Disk management, bring it online and make sure you assign it a drive letter thats not already in use IE, F:\ G:\ Etc

Steam games for example have the ability to do this you can have multiple locations for installed games "like so" https://support.steampowered.com/kb_article.php?ref=771...


Deleting windows however is more tricky .... i personally don't delete the Os's unless i was clever enough to partition the OS away from the data store ..... I might finally get round to it if i get really tight on space , but you need to be careful with how you do this because some applications will have tie ins with the windows files .
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July 18, 2014 3:48:31 AM

synthaside said:
I have done this myself , using old Os disks as Secondary storage platters I have no issues with running and accessing the content on those drives , you have to make sure that you extend ownership of that data and you can access most of the applications on the disk .... with some exceptions which require windows integration.

Add the secondary disk and open Windows Disk management, bring it online and make sure you assign it a drive letter thats not already in use IE, F:\ G:\ Etc

Steam games for example have the ability to do this you can have multiple locations for installed games "like so" https://support.steampowered.com/kb_article.php?ref=771...


Deleting windows however is more tricky .... i personally don't delete the Os's unless i was clever enough to partition the OS away from the data store ..... I might finally get round to it if i get really tight on space , but you need to be careful with how you do this because some applications will have tie ins with the windows files .


What do you mean when you say that I have to "extend ownership" of the data? As for the link on moving steam install locations, I didn't know it would be so simple, thanks for the link, helps a lot. I guess I wont touch the windows on the second drive if it doesn't cause any problems.
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July 21, 2014 9:00:49 AM

Sorry for the late reply , busy weekend ... essentially when you pop the old disk in a new machine
the user space ( ie the area personal documents / applications are installed ) will be considered private to the new PC ...this is fine ... as the administrator for both machines you will be able to force your new windows to take Ownership ( Ie the ability to read / write / execute ) on the data

It sounds more complex than it is , you pope the drive in and as you navigate around , it will pop up saying you dont have rights over this disk .. to add rights to the disk you can right click on the drive , or folders themselves and in the security tab modify the rights ... essentially granting your new machine rights over the data.
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