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First Build Ever (gaming & rendering) $1500

Last response: in Systems
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July 21, 2014 5:58:06 AM

Hi guys,
This is gonna be my first build ever
I'm gonna use this computer for gaming and some architectural task
The software that i use mostly are: Adobe cs6 (photoshop, illustrator, indesign), sketchup, autocad, and revit. I also do some vray rendering

Please review my build

Heres my component list:
http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Cophyor/saved/qTxbt6

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i7-4790K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI Z87-G45 Gaming ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($152.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($139.98 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 780 3GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($439.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($62.00 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1567.85
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

P.S: I don't need monitor, keyboard nor mouse
July 21, 2014 6:06:18 AM

Did you want the total to be under $1500?
Your build looks great if you're fine with $1600
The only thing I'd change is the power supply. Seasonic is a much better brand than the cx version corsairs.

Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($71.30 @ Newegg)
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July 21, 2014 6:10:47 AM

@t3nn1spr3p
Thanks for the quick reply
My budget is flexible, max $1700
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July 21, 2014 6:13:06 AM

I was also debating whether i should get gtx 770 or 780?
Is gtx 780 worth the extra $100+ compare to gtx 770?
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July 21, 2014 6:22:00 AM

In my opinion, no, 780 isn't worth the extra money.
Ya, it'll get a bit more performance, but not enough to notice it.

Also, are you gaming on one monitor? And 1080p?
You'll notice it less, if even at all on one 1080p monitor.

The 770 would last you at least 5 years playing games at very high settings.
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Best solution

July 21, 2014 6:43:37 AM

I like this motherboard better.
You need some thermal paste for cpu and gpu.
Better ram.
Changed to a gigabyte 770, though the msi 770 frozr works really well too.
Downgraded to 120GB solid state drive. 250 is huge, and you shouldn't need too much on it. Solid states are also going down in cost steadily, so you can always buy something larger in the future, for less.
And added some good case fans.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i7-4790K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Amazon)
Thermal Compound: Gelid Solutions GC-Extreme 3.5g Thermal Paste ($12.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: ASRock Z97 EXTREME4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($130.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Trident X 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($80.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 770 2GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($71.30 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.98 @ OutletPC)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF120 Performance Edition (2-Pack) 63.5 CFM 120mm Fans ($29.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1496.16
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
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July 21, 2014 7:18:06 AM

@t3nn1s
Thanks dude, you've been very helpful
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July 21, 2014 9:51:09 PM

My final build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i7-4790K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
Thermal Compound: Gelid Solutions GC-Extreme 3.5g Thermal Paste ($12.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI Z97-GAMING 7 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Trident X 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($79.00 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 770 2GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($309.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair Air 540 Silver ATX Mid Tower Case ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($71.30 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Case Fan: Corsair Air Series AF120 Performance Edition (2-Pack) 63.5 CFM 120mm Fans ($29.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1495.15
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-07-22 00:50 EDT-0400
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July 22, 2014 6:50:11 AM

Looks perfect. And that case is really cool and nice to build with.

The only other thing is the power supply. Seasonic is really reliable, but usually the S12II is used in ~ $1000 builds.

The rest of your build is SO nice, and at $1500 people usually get either a modular power supply (semi or full doesn't matter), or a higher quality one. Again, the S12II will work perfectly fine, but is only a little louder compared to the M12II for example ($20 more).

Then for ~ $100 ($30 more than the S12II), you could get a really high quality fully modular psu. Depends on what you want to spend.
All of these will last about the same amount of time, so investing more won't buy significant longevity. The biggest advantage would just be the easier cable management.

Another thing to think about is that with a 770, it'd be a giant upgrade in the future to go to SLI 770's. Who knows, in 3 years, you could want to go to a 1440p monitor (because they're gorgeous), or 3 x 1080p monitors. Dual 770's would be more powerful than even a $1000 card.
And if you think that it might be a possibility in the future, getting an 850 watt power supply now would prevent you from having to buy a new one again (which I just did after buying my second 670).

This is the best rated 850W power supply that currently exists, and is amazing for the price. A 750W would be plenty for dual 770's (and this same psu is made in a 750W version), but a little more overhead for $10 is nice.

Power Supply: EVGA 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($119.99 @ NCIX US)

It's $50 more than your currently selected psu, so you'll have to make that decision on cost. Good Luck
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