Sign-in / Sign-up
Your question
Solved

How to properly use an embedded laptop battery?

Last response: in Laptop Tech Support
July 21, 2014 2:08:04 PM

Good night,
We've just bought a Toshiba Laptop: satelite m50-a-11h. Its battery is embedded. and replacement prices seem to be around for similar models 300-400 bucks ( didn't expect that ). Have you guys used similar notebooks. How did you charge it? How long did it hold out? I just wanted to listen to your experiences.

And, not to forget, my old laptops battery is dead, and I am using it plugged in ( battery removed ) like a desktop. Do you guys know the interior of Toshiba laptops? I mean is it gonna be possible to just remove them and use it the same way in case we can't find a new pack for a good price. Thanks.

More about : properly embedded laptop battery

Best solution

July 21, 2014 2:23:41 PM

Couple options:

Either get a universal/compatiable external battery with an adapter that fits your laptop (heavier but no need to open the laptop to replace the battery)

Or replace the internal battery with an aftermarket one made for your model laptop. (much more mobile as battery is internal, but requires opening the laptop and replacing the existing battery).

I can't speak as to which is better as I do not know your comfort level in electronics repair, nor how easy it is to replace the battery in your specific model laptop.

As for replacing the battery it could be dead simple: remove a couple screws, pop the bottom of the laptop off, unplug the battery, unscrew it, replace it, plug it in, replace th case.... or it could have the wires from the laptop directly soldered into the moterboard and/or very diffcult to physically remove from the inner parts of the laptop.
Share
July 21, 2014 2:27:54 PM

Most of the time, the "embedded" or "non-removable" batteries are lithium polymer. This makes for a smaller form factor, and placing it inside the chassis cuts down some on the overall dimensions of the laptop by omitting an external battery bay for a removable battery.

That aside, the batteries are just as reliable as any other. And they are removable! They just take more work and care to access (oh, and then there's the potential to void your warranty).
m
1
l
Related resources
July 21, 2014 2:34:49 PM

Thanks, I have some experience fixing my own laptop which has no warranty, but couldn't disassemble every part. If they are not too deep, I can handle them. What I was wondering was you know some electronic devices don't work without the battery, like my trimmer. You've got to charge it first, it won't work plugged in. According to your experience, may this be an issue. I mean remove the battery but not put a new one if not necessary.

And on battery university, a website, don't know if it is a real university, they recommend a partial charge, but the device manual recommends a full charge. What is your method?
m
0
l
July 21, 2014 3:01:24 PM

Servet Portakal said:
Thanks, I have some experience fixing my own laptop which has no warranty, but couldn't disassemble every part. If they are not too deep, I can handle them. What I was wondering was you know some electronic devices don't work without the battery, like my trimmer. You've got to charge it first, it won't work plugged in. According to your experience, may this be an issue. I mean remove the battery but not put a new one if not necessary.

And on battery university, a website, don't know if it is a real university, they recommend a partial charge, but the device manual recommends a full charge. What is your method?


Most laptops run fine with no battery installed. There may be a few exceptions to the rule, but you can most likely power the laptop exclusively with the AC adapter and no battery pack inserted.

And a partial charge is ideal. Keeping the battery between 20% and 80% puts less stress on the cells and aids to prolong battery life (long term longevity, that is). Charging the battery to 100% and draining it to 0% is only required every once in a great while to calibrate it. Modern electronics prevent the battery from being "overcharged," although a full charge repeatedly will still wear it out.
m
1
l
July 21, 2014 3:04:08 PM

Thanks, all my questions are answered now, thanks for your time :) .
m
0
l
July 21, 2014 3:33:47 PM

Servet Portakal said:
And on battery university, a website, don't know if it is a real university, they recommend a partial charge, but the device manual recommends a full charge. What is your method?


I believe that is for storing a battery over a longer period say weeks/month or longer. If using the device at least weekly I always try for a full charge after fully discharging (as long as practical) as several types of batteries do not last long if always charged from half power.
m
1
l
July 21, 2014 3:45:53 PM

menetlaus said:
If using the device at least weekly I always try for a full charge after fully discharging (as long as practical) as several types of batteries do not last long if always charged from half power.


Be careful! The partial charge theory applies to batteries in use, not just stored. Each 100% charge causes the cells to expand all the more. Doing that and discharging them completely repeatedly will tire the cells out quicker.
m
1
l
July 22, 2014 3:16:32 PM

I've found a setting that sets the max charge level to 80 percent. It's recommended I guess. I'll use it that way.
m
0
l