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Which CPU temp should I be monitoring? Core temp or cpu temp?

So, in regards to overheating, overclocking, benchmarking, world records, and record keeping....which temperature do experts refer to when they speak of CPU temperature? Do they refer to the package core temperatures which is given in the program CoreTemp for example?... or do they refer to something else...like the CPUID "CPU" temp? (which is the higher of the two temps)

[AMD FX-8350]
Here are my system temps at idle...

CoreTEMP:
15°C (all 8 cores)


HW CPUID:

"CPU" Temperature: 34°C
AMD FX-8350 Temp: 15°C


So the question remains, what temperature should I really keep an eye on for overclocking, benchmarking and my overheating?
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about cpu temp monitoring core temp cpu temp
  1. The CPU/Case/Package temp - as given from Bios/UEFI.
  2. the highest temp on one of your 8 cores e.g core 1 32 degrees. should show in hw monitor.
  3. the core temp.

    cpu is over all the core. in OC you have to know what core run hot.
  4. Best answer
    enjoiskaterguy said:


    CoreTEMP:
    15°C (all 8 cores)



    (1) Unless you're using below ambient cooling, or you live somewhere cold and you have your windows open, you can't have temperatures below ambient.

    Standard Ambient temperature is 22C. Ambient directly affects all computer temperatures.

    Here's the temperature conversions and a short scale:

    Cx9/5+32=F ... or ... F-32/9x5=C ... or more simply ... 1C = 1.8F

    30.0C = 86.0F Hot
    29.0C = 84.2F
    28.0C = 82.4F
    27.0C = 80.6F
    26.0C = 78.8F Warm
    25.0C = 77.0F
    24.0C = 75.2F
    23.0C = 73.4F
    22.0C = 71.6F Standard ... or ... 22.2C = 72.0F
    21.0C = 69.8F
    20.0C = 68.0F Cool

    As Ambient temperature increases, thermal headroom and overclocking potential decreases.


    (2) The heat sources are within the cores, which are always the hottest part of the entire processor, so you should always monitor your core temperatures.
  5. CompuTronix said:
    enjoiskaterguy said:


    CoreTEMP:
    15°C (all 8 cores)



    (1) Unless you're using below ambient cooling, or you live somewhere cold and you have your windows open, you can't have temperatures below ambient.

    Standard Ambient temperature is 22C. Ambient directly affects all computer temperatures.

    Here's the temperature conversions and a short scale:

    Cx9/5+32=F ... or ... F-32/9x5=C ... or more simply ... 1C = 1.8F

    30.0C = 86.0F Hot
    29.0C = 84.2F
    28.0C = 82.4F
    27.0C = 80.6F
    26.0C = 78.8F Warm
    25.0C = 77.0F
    24.0C = 75.2F
    23.0C = 73.4F
    22.0C = 71.6F Standard ... or ... 22.2C = 72.0F
    21.0C = 69.8F
    20.0C = 68.0F Cool

    As Ambient temperature increases, thermal headroom and overclocking potential decreases.


    (2) The heat sources are within the cores, which are always the hottest part of the entire processor, so you should always monitor your core temperatures.


    Yes, 15℃. This is is only achieved at night. In fact, I have gotten as low as 11℃ at night at idle. Idle temps are usually between 21-29℃. I live in northern California fyi. But yes my idle temps usually match my ambient room temps or are higher.

    Thank you for the response.
  6. Even in Northern California you must be at a considerable elevation to get those ambient temperatures at night in early August. I've travelled the area, and it's very scenic country.
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