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Buy a new i5 2500 or i5 3750 for new overall usage

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July 29, 2014 10:34:57 PM

I am buying a new pc..i need a good stable fast cpu for normal usage and minor gaming...I am afraid of the 3rd gen i5 an the ivy bridge get hot too much...so will the i5 3500 be good enough for 5-7 yr for my normal day today usage..i don't consider i7 as i don't need HT ..help me select them and do suggest a good MB for it..like Z68 OR Z77..any good model

More about : buy 2500 3750 usage

a c 327 à CPUs
July 29, 2014 10:38:30 PM

Get an i5 4690 and put it on a H97 motherboard.

The i5 3570 and 2500 are old.
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July 29, 2014 10:40:48 PM

Better to get a new i5 4690k
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July 29, 2014 10:53:34 PM

i7Baby said:
Get an i5 4690 and put it on a H97 motherboard.

The i5 3570 and 2500 are old.


But these are more pricy and more heating issue..i need a stable all round performance for next 7 year..i5 2nd gen is a legend i suppose

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July 29, 2014 10:53:52 PM

Mac266 said:
Better to get a new i5 4690k


But these are more pricy and more heating issue..i need a stable all round performance for next 7 year..i5 2nd gen is a legend i suppose
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a c 327 à CPUs
July 29, 2014 10:55:22 PM

mitu1234 said:
i7Baby said:
Get an i5 4690 and put it on a H97 motherboard.

The i5 3570 and 2500 are old.


But these are more pricy and more heating issue..i need a stable all round performance for next 7 year..i5 2nd gen is a legend i suppose



You don't have a budget, so they are OK. They are newer and don't generate as much heat as the old ones.

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a b à CPUs
July 29, 2014 10:59:42 PM

The 2500 is a 35nm cpu, while the 4670 is a 22nm cpu. Its newer, faster, and cooler.
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July 29, 2014 11:18:09 PM

CPU heat is a non-issue nowadays, but from your words, it seems like you're hinting to wanting an overclockable version? Overclocking is the only time when you seriously need to worry about heat. Otherwise, nada. Even the stock cooler will do fine, but if you're really obsessed, you can get something cheap like a Hyper 212 EVO.

To add to the mix, there is really no reason to worry about heat generation between different generations of CPU unless you're a picky hardcore pushing the CPU to it's physical and thermal limit in overclocking. I have an i5-4430 of the Haswells. The Haswell line is supposed to be crappy because they replaced the fluxless solder under the CPU lid with cheap thermal paste from the old generation CPUs. On full load, my CPU never exceeds 40C even during the hot summer months with a Hyper N520. Get the newest CPU you can buy, which is in your case, the i5-4590, i5-4690, etc.
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July 29, 2014 11:25:18 PM

Gunmetal_61 said:
CPU heat is a non-issue nowadays, but from your words, it seems like you're hinting to wanting an overclockable version? Overclocking is the only time when you seriously need to worry about heat. Otherwise, nada. Even the stock cooler will do fine, but if you're really obsessed, you can get something cheap like a Hyper 212 EVO.

To add to the mix, there is really no reason to worry about heat generation between different generations of CPU unless you're a picky hardcore pushing the CPU to it's physical and thermal limit in overclocking. I have an i5-4430 of the Haswells. The Haswell line is supposed to be crappy because they replaced the fluxless solder under the CPU lid with cheap thermal paste from the old generation CPUs. On full load, my CPU never exceeds 40C even during the hot summer months with a Hyper N520. Get the newest CPU you can buy, which is in your case, the i5-4590, i5-4690, etc.


you told the 4th gen is crappy...i don't need higherclock/overclock...just need a normal all round performer with less trouble of any heat etc and long lasting for at least 7yr
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July 29, 2014 11:25:48 PM

Mac266 said:
The 2500 is a 35nm cpu, while the 4670 is a 22nm cpu. Its newer, faster, and cooler.


..i don't need higherclock/overclock...just need a normal all round performer with less trouble of any heat etc and long lasting for at least 7yr
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July 29, 2014 11:27:41 PM

i7Baby said:
mitu1234 said:
i7Baby said:
Get an i5 4690 and put it on a H97 motherboard.

The i5 3570 and 2500 are old.


But these are more pricy and more heating issue..i need a stable all round performance for next 7 year..i5 2nd gen is a legend i suppose



You don't have a budget, so they are OK. They are newer and don't generate as much heat as the old ones.



but the sansd bridge is stable and generate less heat..i can extend my budget but for my requirement only...you told the 4th gen is crappy...i don't need higherclock/overclock...just need a normal all round performer with less trouble of any heat etc and long lasting for at least 7yr
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July 29, 2014 11:43:32 PM

CPUs generally last well over 10 years. Heat only becomes an issue with CPUs once temps go past 80 degrees continuously during normal operation, that is, when you're doing anything except doing load tests with CPUs like Prime95 and Intel Burn Test. My CPU only ever gets to 60 degrees during normal use, and it's overclocked with a stock cooler, though it gets to 80 degrees when stress testing which is normal.
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a b à CPUs
July 30, 2014 12:05:19 AM

As has already been said, heat is only an issue when overclocking. At stock, a haswell i5 4590 will likely run alot cooler than a 2500 would, and it would be a fair bit quicker.

Sandy is old mate, let her bow out gracefully.
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July 30, 2014 12:07:11 AM

mitu1234 said:
Gunmetal_61 said:
CPU heat is a non-issue nowadays, but from your words, it seems like you're hinting to wanting an overclockable version? Overclocking is the only time when you seriously need to worry about heat. Otherwise, nada. Even the stock cooler will do fine, but if you're really obsessed, you can get something cheap like a Hyper 212 EVO.

To add to the mix, there is really no reason to worry about heat generation between different generations of CPU unless you're a picky hardcore pushing the CPU to it's physical and thermal limit in overclocking. I have an i5-4430 of the Haswells. The Haswell line is supposed to be crappy because they replaced the fluxless solder under the CPU lid with cheap thermal paste from the old generation CPUs. On full load, my CPU never exceeds 40C even during the hot summer months with a Hyper N520. Get the newest CPU you can buy, which is in your case, the i5-4590, i5-4690, etc.


you told the 4th gen is crappy...i don't need higherclock/overclock...just need a normal all round performer with less trouble of any heat etc and long lasting for at least 7yr


I said that it was SUPPOSED to be crappy. The people who said it was are the people who look nitpick and obsess over these issues too much. I also said in my case that Haswell works out just fine, no problem. You're making this out to be a much bigger worry that it actually is. You don't need to care about what generation of CPU you're choosing over thermal matters. Just choose the newest one. The fastest one. The difference between the average operating temperature between an Ivy Bridge and a Haswell is only a few degrees at most. It's not like the CPU is going to become a furnace as it ages.

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July 30, 2014 12:57:10 AM

Mac266 said:
As has already been said, heat is only an issue when overclocking. At stock, a haswell i5 4590 will likely run alot cooler than a 2500 would, and it would be a fair bit quicker.

Sandy is old mate, let her bow out gracefully.


but there are review saying the trigate 22nm ivy runs more hot than thr previous gen sandy which is 32nm and more stable and durable
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July 30, 2014 12:57:49 AM

Gunmetal_61 said:
mitu1234 said:
Gunmetal_61 said:
CPU heat is a non-issue nowadays, but from your words, it seems like you're hinting to wanting an overclockable version? Overclocking is the only time when you seriously need to worry about heat. Otherwise, nada. Even the stock cooler will do fine, but if you're really obsessed, you can get something cheap like a Hyper 212 EVO.

To add to the mix, there is really no reason to worry about heat generation between different generations of CPU unless you're a picky hardcore pushing the CPU to it's physical and thermal limit in overclocking. I have an i5-4430 of the Haswells. The Haswell line is supposed to be crappy because they replaced the fluxless solder under the CPU lid with cheap thermal paste from the old generation CPUs. On full load, my CPU never exceeds 40C even during the hot summer months with a Hyper N520. Get the newest CPU you can buy, which is in your case, the i5-4590, i5-4690, etc.


you told the 4th gen is crappy...i don't need higherclock/overclock...just need a normal all round performer with less trouble of any heat etc and long lasting for at least 7yr


I said that it was SUPPOSED to be crappy. The people who said it was are the people who look nitpick and obsess over these issues too much. I also said in my case that Haswell works out just fine, no problem. You're making this out to be a much bigger worry that it actually is. You don't need to care about what generation of CPU you're choosing over thermal matters. Just choose the newest one. The fastest one. The difference between the average operating temperature between an Ivy Bridge and a Haswell is only a few degrees at most. It's not like the CPU is going to become a furnace as it ages.



but there are review saying the trigate 22nm ivy runs more hot than thr previous gen sandy which is 32nm and more stable and durable
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July 30, 2014 12:59:08 AM

Icaraeus said:
CPUs generally last well over 10 years. Heat only becomes an issue with CPUs once temps go past 80 degrees continuously during normal operation, that is, when you're doing anything except doing load tests with CPUs like Prime95 and Intel Burn Test. My CPU only ever gets to 60 degrees during normal use, and it's overclocked with a stock cooler, though it gets to 80 degrees when stress testing which is normal.


but there are review saying the trigate 22nm ivy runs more hot than thr previous gen sandy which is 32nm and more stable and durable
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July 30, 2014 2:58:17 AM

If you're not overclocking, the heat will not be an issue.

The heat issue was blown entirely out of proportion, and is mainly a concern with overclockers. The issue being that effectively, with the previous generation overclocking more reliably and with less heat, an older chip could perform nearly on par with the new chips with enough power and cooling applied. This meant that an upgrade was almost pointless, which frustrated some members of the community.

Remove the overclocking from the situation, and you have a good performance increase as the chips get newer. At stock, the Ivybridge will perform better than the Sandybridge in almost every situation.

In my opinion, go with a Haswell chip, and if budget is not a concern make it an i7. The chips themselves should easily last the amount of time you require, and perform relatively well. A good example being the i7-920, which will be 6 years old in Q4 of this year, and quite a few users find it still performs admirably.
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