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I'm preparing to overclock and I have questions.

My build: Asus Z87 sabertooth, i7-4770K cooled by arctic silver thermal paste and an enermax black twister T40, 8 GB of Patriot viper 1600Mhz RAM 1.5V, Gigabyte gtx 780 ti, corsair ax860.

I just did research on OC'ing for Intel haswell 4th gen unlocked CPU's and I know I have to crank up the CPU multiplier per MHz. I was thinking of cranking it to 42 for a 4.2GHz to stay on the safe side of things. Should I keep the core ratio on auto, sync all cores, or per core? Now let's get into CPU voltage, what would be a good voltage for 4.2? I was thinking of 1.2v to be safe as well. Also, would intel burn test be good enough for stress testing, or is there any other stress test software that I should use? That's all the questions that I currently have, if there's anything I'm missing please let me know so that I am overclocking the right way. Thanks TH community! :)
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  1. Best answer
    Hi there :)

    Sync all cores to start with! Also, do not start at 4.2, if your vcore voltage setting can't handle it, it could stop you from being able to POST. 1.2 is a good voltage to start with, but you should try 4.1 first, then 4.2 just to stay safe. Intel burn test is great! Prime95 small FFTs is also good. Use CPU-ID to watch the voltage and RealTemp to monitor the temperatures as you run the stress test. :)

    Good luck! Let me know how it goes! :D
  2. PhaseRebirth said:
    My build: Asus Z87 sabertooth, i7-4770K cooled by arctic silver thermal paste and an enermax black twister T40, 8 GB of Patriot viper 1600Mhz RAM 1.5V, Gigabyte gtx 780 ti, corsair ax860.

    I just did research on OC'ing for Intel haswell 4th gen unlocked CPU's and I know I have to crank up the CPU multiplier per MHz. I was thinking of cranking it to 42 for a 4.2GHz to stay on the safe side of things. Should I keep the core ratio on auto, sync all cores, or per core? Now let's get into CPU voltage, what would be a good voltage for 4.2? I was thinking of 1.2v to be safe as well. Also, would intel burn test be good enough for stress testing, or is there any other stress test software that I should use? That's all the questions that I currently have, if there's anything I'm missing please let me know so that I am overclocking the right way. Thanks TH community! :)


    I would leave the voltage set to auto during the initial overclock attempts. When checking for stability(whichever programs you choose), also open cpu monitoring programs(voltage + temps). On my board, I found auto gave me a stable overclock but also ramped up the voltage to a higher level than my chip needs. Therefore, I was able to back off the voltage until I found my chip/MB sweet spot(a little over 1.2 for 4.4ghz....nothing crazy)
  3. drkatz42 said:
    PhaseRebirth said:
    My build: Asus Z87 sabertooth, i7-4770K cooled by arctic silver thermal paste and an enermax black twister T40, 8 GB of Patriot viper 1600Mhz RAM 1.5V, Gigabyte gtx 780 ti, corsair ax860.

    I just did research on OC'ing for Intel haswell 4th gen unlocked CPU's and I know I have to crank up the CPU multiplier per MHz. I was thinking of cranking it to 42 for a 4.2GHz to stay on the safe side of things. Should I keep the core ratio on auto, sync all cores, or per core? Now let's get into CPU voltage, what would be a good voltage for 4.2? I was thinking of 1.2v to be safe as well. Also, would intel burn test be good enough for stress testing, or is there any other stress test software that I should use? That's all the questions that I currently have, if there's anything I'm missing please let me know so that I am overclocking the right way. Thanks TH community! :)


    I would leave the voltage set to auto during the initial overclock attempts. When checking for stability(whichever programs you choose), also open cpu monitoring programs(voltage + temps). On my board, I found auto gave me a stable overclock but also ramped up the voltage to a higher level than my chip needs. Therefore, I was able to back off the voltage until I found my chip/MB sweet spot(a little over 1.2 for 4.4ghz....nothing crazy)


    You should never use auto voltages when OCing! It's better to use a higher setting than you need at first and reducing it later on until you run into a BSOD. :)
  4. Alex Kelly said:
    drkatz42 said:
    PhaseRebirth said:
    My build: Asus Z87 sabertooth, i7-4770K cooled by arctic silver thermal paste and an enermax black twister T40, 8 GB of Patriot viper 1600Mhz RAM 1.5V, Gigabyte gtx 780 ti, corsair ax860.

    I just did research on OC'ing for Intel haswell 4th gen unlocked CPU's and I know I have to crank up the CPU multiplier per MHz. I was thinking of cranking it to 42 for a 4.2GHz to stay on the safe side of things. Should I keep the core ratio on auto, sync all cores, or per core? Now let's get into CPU voltage, what would be a good voltage for 4.2? I was thinking of 1.2v to be safe as well. Also, would intel burn test be good enough for stress testing, or is there any other stress test software that I should use? That's all the questions that I currently have, if there's anything I'm missing please let me know so that I am overclocking the right way. Thanks TH community! :)


    I would leave the voltage set to auto during the initial overclock attempts. When checking for stability(whichever programs you choose), also open cpu monitoring programs(voltage + temps). On my board, I found auto gave me a stable overclock but also ramped up the voltage to a higher level than my chip needs. Therefore, I was able to back off the voltage until I found my chip/MB sweet spot(a little over 1.2 for 4.4ghz....nothing crazy)


    You should never use auto voltages when OCing! It's better to use a higher setting than you need at first and reducing it later on until you run into a BSOD. :)


    For my knowledge, why should you never use auto voltages? Especially when you're looking at such a mild overclock?
  5. drkatz42 said:
    Alex Kelly said:
    drkatz42 said:
    PhaseRebirth said:
    My build: Asus Z87 sabertooth, i7-4770K cooled by arctic silver thermal paste and an enermax black twister T40, 8 GB of Patriot viper 1600Mhz RAM 1.5V, Gigabyte gtx 780 ti, corsair ax860.

    I just did research on OC'ing for Intel haswell 4th gen unlocked CPU's and I know I have to crank up the CPU multiplier per MHz. I was thinking of cranking it to 42 for a 4.2GHz to stay on the safe side of things. Should I keep the core ratio on auto, sync all cores, or per core? Now let's get into CPU voltage, what would be a good voltage for 4.2? I was thinking of 1.2v to be safe as well. Also, would intel burn test be good enough for stress testing, or is there any other stress test software that I should use? That's all the questions that I currently have, if there's anything I'm missing please let me know so that I am overclocking the right way. Thanks TH community! :)


    I would leave the voltage set to auto during the initial overclock attempts. When checking for stability(whichever programs you choose), also open cpu monitoring programs(voltage + temps). On my board, I found auto gave me a stable overclock but also ramped up the voltage to a higher level than my chip needs. Therefore, I was able to back off the voltage until I found my chip/MB sweet spot(a little over 1.2 for 4.4ghz....nothing crazy)


    You should never use auto voltages when OCing! It's better to use a higher setting than you need at first and reducing it later on until you run into a BSOD. :)


    For my knowledge, why should you never use auto voltages? Especially when your looking at such a mild overclock?


    Because if your motherboard doesn't give enough voltage to the CPU, you might not be able to boot at all, or get back into the BIOS to change it back until you clear the CMOS.
    It's best to avoid these issues. :)
  6. Alex Kelly said:
    drkatz42 said:
    Alex Kelly said:
    drkatz42 said:
    PhaseRebirth said:
    My build: Asus Z87 sabertooth, i7-4770K cooled by arctic silver thermal paste and an enermax black twister T40, 8 GB of Patriot viper 1600Mhz RAM 1.5V, Gigabyte gtx 780 ti, corsair ax860.

    I just did research on OC'ing for Intel haswell 4th gen unlocked CPU's and I know I have to crank up the CPU multiplier per MHz. I was thinking of cranking it to 42 for a 4.2GHz to stay on the safe side of things. Should I keep the core ratio on auto, sync all cores, or per core? Now let's get into CPU voltage, what would be a good voltage for 4.2? I was thinking of 1.2v to be safe as well. Also, would intel burn test be good enough for stress testing, or is there any other stress test software that I should use? That's all the questions that I currently have, if there's anything I'm missing please let me know so that I am overclocking the right way. Thanks TH community! :)


    I would leave the voltage set to auto during the initial overclock attempts. When checking for stability(whichever programs you choose), also open cpu monitoring programs(voltage + temps). On my board, I found auto gave me a stable overclock but also ramped up the voltage to a higher level than my chip needs. Therefore, I was able to back off the voltage until I found my chip/MB sweet spot(a little over 1.2 for 4.4ghz....nothing crazy)


    You should never use auto voltages when OCing! It's better to use a higher setting than you need at first and reducing it later on until you run into a BSOD. :)


    For my knowledge, why should you never use auto voltages? Especially when your looking at such a mild overclock?


    Because if your motherboard doesn't give enough voltage to the CPU, you might not be able to boot at all, or get back into the BIOS to change it back until you clear the CMOS.
    It's best to avoid these issues. :)


    I see your point. The last couple of boards I've owned have an overclock guard feature(3 non-posts and it reverts back, so it boots)
  7. drkatz42 said:
    Alex Kelly said:
    drkatz42 said:
    Alex Kelly said:
    drkatz42 said:
    PhaseRebirth said:
    My build: Asus Z87 sabertooth, i7-4770K cooled by arctic silver thermal paste and an enermax black twister T40, 8 GB of Patriot viper 1600Mhz RAM 1.5V, Gigabyte gtx 780 ti, corsair ax860.

    I just did research on OC'ing for Intel haswell 4th gen unlocked CPU's and I know I have to crank up the CPU multiplier per MHz. I was thinking of cranking it to 42 for a 4.2GHz to stay on the safe side of things. Should I keep the core ratio on auto, sync all cores, or per core? Now let's get into CPU voltage, what would be a good voltage for 4.2? I was thinking of 1.2v to be safe as well. Also, would intel burn test be good enough for stress testing, or is there any other stress test software that I should use? That's all the questions that I currently have, if there's anything I'm missing please let me know so that I am overclocking the right way. Thanks TH community! :)


    I would leave the voltage set to auto during the initial overclock attempts. When checking for stability(whichever programs you choose), also open cpu monitoring programs(voltage + temps). On my board, I found auto gave me a stable overclock but also ramped up the voltage to a higher level than my chip needs. Therefore, I was able to back off the voltage until I found my chip/MB sweet spot(a little over 1.2 for 4.4ghz....nothing crazy)


    You should never use auto voltages when OCing! It's better to use a higher setting than you need at first and reducing it later on until you run into a BSOD. :)


    For my knowledge, why should you never use auto voltages? Especially when your looking at such a mild overclock?


    Because if your motherboard doesn't give enough voltage to the CPU, you might not be able to boot at all, or get back into the BIOS to change it back until you clear the CMOS.
    It's best to avoid these issues. :)


    I see your point. The last couple of boards I've owned have an overclock guard feature(3 non-posts and it reverts back, so it boots)


    Mine does too :) that's a good point.
    Sometimes that feature doesn't work properly though, unfortunately.
    It's unlikely that he would have these issues with auto voltage, but I think it's just best to make sure it has no chance of happening. :)
  8. Alex Kelly said:
    Hi there :)

    Sync all cores to start with! Also, do not start at 4.2, if your vcore voltage setting can't handle it, it could stop you from being able to POST. 1.2 is a good voltage to start with, but you should try 4.1 first, then 4.2 just to stay safe. Intel burn test is great! Prime95 small FFTs is also good. Use CPU-ID to watch the voltage and RealTemp to monitor the temperatures as you run the stress test. :)

    Good luck! Let me know how it goes! :D


    Thank you, I successfully got a stable 4.4Ghz oc on 1.2V! I got lucky on this CPU, that's for sure!
  9. PhaseRebirth said:
    Alex Kelly said:
    Hi there :)

    Sync all cores to start with! Also, do not start at 4.2, if your vcore voltage setting can't handle it, it could stop you from being able to POST. 1.2 is a good voltage to start with, but you should try 4.1 first, then 4.2 just to stay safe. Intel burn test is great! Prime95 small FFTs is also good. Use CPU-ID to watch the voltage and RealTemp to monitor the temperatures as you run the stress test. :)

    Good luck! Let me know how it goes! :D


    Thank you, I successfully got a stable 4.4Ghz oc on 1.2V! I got lucky on this CPU, that's for sure!



    Nice! I just tried 4.4 with a voltage of 1.18, and I blue screened after my 8th pass in Intel Burn Test. D:
    I suppose I could try 1.2 but over 70C my cooler gets annoyingly loud. Might just stick to 4.3

    Make sure you run at least 10 passes of IBT to make sure it's completely stable, even then you MAY BSOD after hours of gaming. If you do, just raise the vcore a little or drop the OC by 100Mhz if you're already getting over 80C in IBT.

    Also, you should try reducing the voltage for your vcore now that you have it stable, so it can run as cool as it possibly can.
    I suggest reducing it by 0.05 or less each time. :D
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