Sign-in / Sign-up
Your question
Solved

Accurate/Close Mouse DPI Conversion for Monitor Resolution?

Tags:
  • Mice
  • Resolution
  • DPI
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics Cards
August 3, 2014 6:51:50 PM

Hello, by the title of this thread, it's pretty difficult to know what im trying to say. I'll explain as best as I can.

My monitor resolution is 1080p, meaning I use 1080p for everything, gaming, surfing the web, etc.
My mouse DPI is 2400, pretty high I understand, but I'm used to it. One day I considered using 720p for variety of games, to get more FPS, but when I do so, it changes the sensitivity of my mouse DPI. I understand that the less Resolution, the more sensitive will become the mouse cursor.

My question is, can anyone give me some way for me to calculate my mouse DPI so it can be similar when I switch resolutions.

For example, 2400 dpi for 1080p, for me to get similar cursor movement, I would have to make it 2000? I'm guessing here. Help. thanks.

More about : accurate close mouse dpi conversion monitor resolution

Best solution

August 3, 2014 7:04:43 PM

DPI is literally "dots per inch", so if your mouse is 2400 dpi and you move your mouse 1 inch to the left it will see 2400 dots and move the cursor on the screen 2400 dots(pixels) to the left. Windows and games all have their own multiplication factors added in, but those will stay the same across resolution so the end result is if you go from 1080P to 720P you should turn the DPI from 2400 to 1600 to account for the screen having only two thirds the number of "dots" in any direction.
Share
August 3, 2014 7:27:06 PM

hunter315 said:
DPI is literally "dots per inch", so if your mouse is 2400 dpi and you move your mouse 1 inch to the left it will see 2400 dots and move the cursor on the screen 2400 dots(pixels) to the left. Windows and games all have their own multiplication factors added in, but those will stay the same across resolution so the end result is if you go from 1080P to 720P you should turn the DPI from 2400 to 1600 to account for the screen having only two thirds the number of "dots" in any direction.


you are a god
m
0
l
August 4, 2014 3:41:31 PM

Nah, just an engineer :p 
m
0
l
August 22, 2014 6:18:01 PM

The only thing that doesn't seem to make sense with the definition of Dpi is that firstly, Display resolution isn't measured in dots per inch, it's measured in pixels. Printed material is measured in dpi so it should be called ppi (pixels per inch). Secondly, even if that was the case then by definition with all of my movement compensation filters set to 0 such as computer sensitivity and mouse acceleration for legacy devices, then that means that moving my mouse 1 inch with a dpi set to 2000 should travel across an entire monitor that has a native resolution of 1920x1080 seeing as any display no matter how large in inches still only has 1920 pixels per horizontal row. However when I set my mouse to 5600dpi with 0 compensation from sensitivity or acceleration I barely clear that 1920 pixels in that 1 inch of movement. So with that reasoning I fail to believe that it is an accurate conversion IMO. Not an engineer, but my profession deals with display technologies.
m
0
l
August 7, 2016 3:52:26 AM

Jazz Pierce said:
The only thing that doesn't seem to make sense with the definition of Dpi is that firstly, Display resolution isn't measured in dots per inch, it's measured in pixels. Printed material is measured in dpi so it should be called ppi (pixels per inch). Secondly, even if that was the case then by definition with all of my movement compensation filters set to 0 such as computer sensitivity and mouse acceleration for legacy devices, then that means that moving my mouse 1 inch with a dpi set to 2000 should travel across an entire monitor that has a native resolution of 1920x1080 seeing as any display no matter how large in inches still only has 1920 pixels per horizontal row. However when I set my mouse to 5600dpi with 0 compensation from sensitivity or acceleration I barely clear that 1920 pixels in that 1 inch of movement. So with that reasoning I fail to believe that it is an accurate conversion IMO. Not an engineer, but my profession deals with display technologies.


I know this is 2 years ago, so idk if u already know or not but...

You did wrong there on 1 thing...
1 dot = 1 pixel in fact but...
If u put your mouse sensitivity to lower than 6/11 than u multiplying lower than uy should...
6/11=1
So 5600 dpi x 1 = 5600
If u put lower sens ofc u can't travel all the monitor with 5600dpi =P
Now in 3D games its diferent coz even if u uhave a 1080p monitor its not 1080p... its more.. its vast ...
So if u turn arround, u don't lack on 1080p coz, u can turn arround till u have no more mouse pad or till u get tired..=P
In 2D or windows, the DPI is like 1 pixel
So 1080p = 1080dots
But since you can't do it on a mouse coz the mouse multiply from x50
Or u use 1100 or less =P
But in 2D its really up to you how u travel your mouse =P
On 3D is where is important =P
More DPI doesn't mean BETTER =P
Infact some mouses can get 16400dpi+ but its no use xD
In fps you want precision so u lower it...
In 3D games usually u need precision and accuracy...
If u put more DPI than normal u probably will skip alot of pixels xD and accuracy will lower
m
0
l