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Future-Proof System for a Friend

So I'm trying to build a system for a friend of mine who uses her computer for basic word processing/Web/videos (maybe blu-ray?). She's looking to spend <$800 and it doesn't matter how loud the system is (Thats why I went with the Antec 900 Case). A must-have is the samsung 840 pro ssd and case for excellent cooling (she doesnt mind the LED's). I know the build I've made is probably over-kill for her use but I'd like it to last at least 6-7+ yrs. The reason I went with a APU solution is because her nephew like to come over and do light MMO gaming. I will be putting Windows 7 Pro on it. This is the build I made for her on PCPartpicker and I just wanted some suggestions to the build.

>>> http://pcpartpicker.com/p/F7mqrH <<<

Feel free to modify the build in anyway and please leave reasons why. Thanks!
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More about future proof system friend
  1. Can't future proof a PC since hardware gets more advanced with lower power consumption and faster hardware every year or two. Only thing worth upgrading is the video card ram hard drive from time to time

    I would waste 600-700$ max on a pc unless you want bragging rights to last you for 7 months
  2. Since your build isn't meant for hardcore-gaming, it will do fine for a long time 5-6 years minimum, the APU should be able to play light games for years but just not on high settings.
  3. Best answer
    There is no such thing as "future proofing" In particular, the APU series have nowhere to effectively go.
    Their cpu speeds are not great, and once you add a discrete graphics card for gaming, you have wasted the advantage of the excellent graphics of the apu.

    Here is a post I made for a budget build.
    Take from it what you will:

    ------------------------------ budget build ---------------------------
    For a budget build, I like to recommend that one builds for future expandability.
    That means paying a bit more up front for some parts that allow for an easier future upgrade.
    Let me start where you might not expect:
    1. Buy a good 620w psu. Such a unit will run any future graphics card.
    I would normally suggest Seasonic 620w:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
    But this EVGA 600w unit is going for a very good price:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
    2. Buy a Z97 based motherboard. Z97 will allow you to install a overclockable cpu and even offer a future 14nm broadwell upgrade.
    You should find one for under $100.
    Here is a M-ATX : http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157529
    3. I suggest a G3258. It is a overclockable dual core at a budget price of about $75.
    Here is what it can do: http://techreport.com/review/26735/overclocking-intel-p...
    In time, you can upgrade to any cpu that you want and market the G3258.
    4. The intel stock cooler will do the job up to a point. But, I suggest a $30 tower type cooler like the cm hyper212 with a 120mm fan. It will cool better and be quieter under load.
    5. For ram, speed is not important. Buy a 8gb kit of 2 x 4gb DDR3 1.5v ram.
    If you will be using the integrated graphics, I suggest faster ram. It improves the performance. 1866 is good. You will get a WEI of 6.4.
    6. Cases are a personal thing. Buy one you love. Most will do the job for <$50.
    It would be hard to beat $34 delivered for this Antec GX500 :
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
    7. The graphics card is the most important component for gaming. My usual rule of thumb is to budget 2x the cpu cost for the graphics card. I like the GTX750ti and EVGA as a brand.
    Here is a superclock version:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
    You could go stronger in the video card if your budget permits and your games need it.
    On the other hand, you could build using the integrated graphics and see how you do.
    By deferring on the graphics card, you will get a better idea of what you really need.
    Integrated is fine for sims, but not fast action games.
    8. Lastly, I will never build again without a SSD for the "C" drive. It makes everything you do so much quicker. 120gb will hold the OS and a handful of games. With 240gb you may never need a hard drive at all. Defer on a hard drive until your ssd approaches 90% full.

    -------------good luck------------


    Some comments on your list:
    1. 120gb can fill up very quickly. A 240gb Samsung EVO is cheap and will outperform the PRO. I have both and you can't tell the difference.

    2. If you will use a M-ATX sixed motherboard, look into the SilverStone SST-PS07B
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811163186
    It is a real gem. I am using one to build for a friend. It is of high quality, has excellent cooling , front air filters .....
    3. The asrock A97-M is not expensive:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157529
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